Kissables with Shea Oil

Posted on: Tue, 01/02/2007 - 10:35pm
samirosenjacken's picture
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Joined: 09/30/2002 - 09:00

Ok, so I have heard of shea nut butter but never shea oil and I've not seen it listed in a food until last night. I was in the store and saw Valentine Kissables and they had shea oil listed as a POSSIBLE ingredient. What do we know about shea oil??

I plan to call on Hershey's today and see what information they can give me.

Posted on: Thu, 03/08/2007 - 2:43am
solarflare's picture
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Joined: 02/07/2002 - 09:00

My peanut/tree nut allergic son has been consuming chocolate containing shea oil for about 4 years now, with no reactions.
Shea oil is a non-issue for us.

Posted on: Thu, 03/08/2007 - 3:50am
gw_mom3's picture
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Joined: 02/14/2000 - 09:00

I'm sure it was posted recently that the Canadian Coffee Crisp bars are made with shea oil. It is not on the label as such, but Cindy called and they told her that shea is one of the oils they use. My dd's allergist advised us to avoid shea oil so we have been but I have the feeling she's already had it in coffee crisp. I keep meaning to call Nestle CA to find out for sure. We have only seen shea oil in the holiday kissables so far.
eta: there is a giant long thread about this in the main discussion forum, and a lot of people have contacted hershey with pretty much no positive results so far. I had friends on an email group contact them as well so hopefully there is power in numbers.
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[b]~Gale~[/b]
[This message has been edited by gw_mom3 (edited March 08, 2007).]

Posted on: Thu, 03/08/2007 - 1:54pm
PeanutKate's picture
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Please do a search on the topic of this "nut". Please also consult your immunologist. This so called nut that gets everyone in a panic might not be the problem that some on this site worry so often about. I am really worried about misinformation and and finding trouble where likely there is none to be found. This is a product that many informed allergists and food science/safety agencies consider to be one of the most hypoallergenic and predictably safe products around and there is considerable debate about whether it is a nut or a pit. Just because in English it has begun to be referred to as a nut does not necessarily make it a tree nut and there are lots of informed immunologists/scientists etc who do not think it is. This is something that we also don't worry about nor do we hassle food processors about it because they can only rely on science not the panic of the uninformed. AARGH. This topic drives me crazy and likely I will not post in future but I worry that people reading will think that just because it is written here it is a true menace. AAARGh,

Posted on: Thu, 03/08/2007 - 2:40pm
mcmom's picture
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Quote:there is considerable debate about whether it is a nut or a pit.
Several good sources do classify it as a tree nut. From Allergic Living:
"With regard to your question as to whether or not this is a true nut, the Food Allergy Research and Resource Program reports the shea nuts are a tree nut, but that they do not belong in the list of commonly allergenic tree nuts. There are no reports of allergic reactions to shea nuts or its products. "
JMO, but since shea has only become commonly used in the last few years, it isn't feasible to say that there have been no reported reactions. People right here on this board have reported having reactions to soaps with shea oil! And it's only recently making its way into a broader selection of food items.
[b]Tidina[/b], the topic of kissables having shea oil came up last month, that was when it first started showing up on labels for the Valentines specially packaged kissables. When I called Hersheys, they said that both recipes were currently being made. I see that the Easter kissables also have shea, but I have yet to come across a "regular" bag with shea. They probably make the holiday ones in a different facility. The rep told me eventually they will switch to one or the other and stick with that. I called and emailed Hersheys to complain, I agree with you, I hope everyone does!
[This message has been edited by mcmom (edited March 09, 2007).]

Posted on: Fri, 03/09/2007 - 9:23am
tidina's picture
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Joined: 01/26/2005 - 09:00

i never knew shea butter was from a nut. i have to talk to the allergist about it but i dont think ill be letting my son try anything with shea oil in it. what bothers me is that it wasnt around in this country and now seems to be making its way here. im worried about what else it might end up in.

Posted on: Fri, 03/09/2007 - 11:54am
gw_mom3's picture
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Joined: 02/14/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by PeanutKate:
[b]Please do a search on the topic of this "nut". Please also consult your immunologist. This so called nut that gets everyone in a panic might not be the problem that some on this site worry so often about. I am really worried about misinformation and and finding trouble where likely there is none to be found. This is a product that many informed allergists and food science/safety agencies consider to be one of the most hypoallergenic and predictably safe products around and there is considerable debate about whether it is a nut or a pit. Just because in English it has begun to be referred to as a nut does not necessarily make it a tree nut and there are lots of informed immunologists/scientists etc who do not think it is. This is something that we also don't worry about nor do we hassle food processors about it because they can only rely on science not the panic of the uninformed. AARGH. This topic drives me crazy and likely I will not post in future but I worry that people reading will think that just because it is written here it is a true menace. AAARGh,[/b]
There's at least one member on this board that has apparently reacted to shea oil. So it may not be completely hypoallergenic. I think she posted on a thread about it in the main discussion forum (may not be the one about kissables, specifically).
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[b]~Gale~[/b]

Posted on: Fri, 03/09/2007 - 2:57pm
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

I think the point is that just because you have a peanut allergy does not mean that shea products have to be off limits.
Even if Kissables have shea oil, I would still eat them even though I have peanut allergy. Being PA for me does not mean that shea is off limits.

Posted on: Fri, 03/09/2007 - 9:33pm
PurpleCat's picture
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Joined: 01/28/2006 - 09:00

My DD reacts to Shea "Nut", she is also allergic to almonds (another "nut") and coconut (another "nut").

Posted on: Fri, 03/09/2007 - 10:18pm
tidina's picture
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Joined: 01/26/2005 - 09:00

i just wouldnt chance it. my son eats things with coconut oil but has never had coconut unless he had it when he was 2? he is negative to almond, cashew, hazelnut and pistachio but we still avoid until we want a food challenge. even then i told him he can only eat those nuts at home because mommy knows which ones to buy. i wouldnt tell the whole family because we would have nuts coming in all the time and not safe ones im sure. anyway, i dont use products with shea butter so no shea oil either for us!!

Posted on: Sat, 03/10/2007 - 3:37am
PeanutKate's picture
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Joined: 05/24/2000 - 09:00

I guess what I am trying to say is to anyone that is interested is this--
1. do your own research in authoritative, peer reviewed scholarly research journals and follow up with a conversation with an informed immunologist doing current research in the field
2. on these boards assume that great support, reliable information, and misinformation exist in equal parts so be a careful information literate consumer when you visit and don't panic until you have done the research that I suggest in 1 above
3. if you believe that you or someone you love has reacted to anything including shea nut then ask your immunologist to do a skin prick test to confirm the reaction and provide documentation or follow-up study if the reaction cannot be confirmed--be sure especially for your children's sake
4. remember that immunologists can test for allergens other than nuts including coconut, nutmeg, shea nut etc which are called nuts but which do not belong in the nut category
thanks for listening

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