Kissables-are the Easter ones safe?

Posted on: Sun, 04/08/2007 - 12:51pm
JeannieLino's picture
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Joined: 06/02/2005 - 09:00

So, my kids received Easter baskets from my dad and sister today. Lots of little plastic filled eggs, filled with pastel colored Hershey Kissables. Just now (almost 11 pm) I remembered that some Kissables packages are saying SHea oil...

Does anyone know if the Easter ones are ok? My girls had some, and Cassie didn't react, but I would like to know for sure and it is too late to call my dad to see if he still has the bag...

Thanks,
Jeannie

Posted on: Sun, 04/08/2007 - 1:33pm
tidina's picture
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Joined: 01/26/2005 - 09:00

some of us are avoiding shea oil because its from the sheanut. there is much debate about this

Posted on: Sun, 04/08/2007 - 9:56pm
JeannieLino's picture
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Joined: 06/02/2005 - 09:00

I know that some people are avoiding, and I have been too, like soaps and lotions and things.
I just didn't remember until late last night that some of the Kissables are now labeled with shea.
Does anyone know if the Easter/pastel ones have the shea label?
This is just so confusing sometimes. And I still don't know if shea is a nut, or more like a fruit (ie coconut)
Thanks again,
Jeannie

Posted on: Sun, 04/08/2007 - 10:52pm
tidina's picture
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Joined: 01/26/2005 - 09:00

the ones i read had it

Posted on: Sun, 04/08/2007 - 10:54pm
notnutty's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2004 - 09:00

The package of pastel Kissables we have has shea oil listed as an ingredient. We have never had a problem with shea oil.

Posted on: Tue, 04/10/2007 - 2:13am
amartin's picture
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Joined: 02/22/2006 - 09:00

Our understanding from Hershey's (we called them at Valentine's Day) is that some packages will have it and others will not. It depends on what factory the Kissables were produced in. You have to read each label to be sure.
If you haven't done so yet, please contact Hershey and ask them to discontinue the use of Shea Oil in their Kissables line. From our interactions with them in February, it appears as if they haven't made a decision either way on whether to use Shea Oil on every Kissables line. I'm not sure if anything has changed as of today, but would be interested if anybody knows...
To reach HERSHEY's....
[url="http://www.hersheys.com/contactus/"]http://www.hersheys.com/contactus/[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 04/11/2007 - 4:47am
VariegatedRB's picture
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Joined: 11/23/2005 - 09:00

BUT- I believe there were some Kissable EGGS this year they had that DID not contain shea oil, because they were just plain old kissables (not the easter colors) inside.
So... read the label and if you aren't sure, call!
Tara P

Posted on: Wed, 04/11/2007 - 8:14am
JeannieLino's picture
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Joined: 06/02/2005 - 09:00

Thanks everyone. Both my dad and sister threw out the bags. They didn't know that shea is a potential issue. They just knew that I had said Kissables are safe.
I will definately contact Hersheys to ask that they stop using shea.
Does anyone have a definate answer about shea? Is it a nut or a fruit (like cocanut) I have tried doing searches on the board, but am not getting anything (I am probably searching wrong
Thanks again for the responses!
Jeannie

Posted on: Wed, 04/11/2007 - 9:31am
Ethan Mom's picture
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Joined: 03/27/2006 - 09:00

I saw Dr. Wood (head of Johns Hopkins pediatric allergy dept.) speak this week at a MD food allergy support group meeting. He discussed the current food allergy research and then held an open Q & A section.
I specifically asked about shea nut b/c I had read conflicting info about whether to avoid or not. He said that shea nut is considered a tree nut and he has seen multiple reactions from those with TNA to shea. He said that he tells nut-allergic patients to avoid shea.
Another person asked about coconut - Dr. Wood replied that there has been ONE case report of a person with TNA and PA reacting ALSO to coconut and that the molecular structure of coconut has a minute section that is similiar to tree-nuts. However, he did specify that coconut is a fruit, not a tree-nut, so TNA people who react also have a coconut allergy as well as a TNA.
Hope that helps!

Posted on: Wed, 04/11/2007 - 5:50pm
gw_mom3's picture
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Joined: 02/14/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Ethan Mom:
[b]I saw Dr. Wood (head of Johns Hopkins pediatric allergy dept.) speak this week at a MD food allergy support group meeting. He discussed the current food allergy research and then held an open Q & A section.
I specifically asked about shea nut b/c I had read conflicting info about whether to avoid or not. He said that shea nut is considered a tree nut and he has seen multiple reactions from those with TNA to shea. He said that he tells nut-allergic patients to avoid shea.
Another person asked about coconut - Dr. Wood replied that there has been ONE case report of a person with TNA and PA reacting ALSO to coconut and that the molecular structure of coconut has a minute section that is similiar to tree-nuts. However, he did specify that coconut is a fruit, not a tree-nut, so TNA people who react also have a coconut allergy as well as a TNA.
Hope that helps![/b]
Thanks for that info. My dd is avoiding shea nut per her allergist although she *may* have had it in Canadian coffee crisp anyway (I need to call Nestle Canada about that). I hope they can test her for it the next time we go.
------------------
==============
[b]~Gale~[/b]

Posted on: Thu, 04/12/2007 - 4:12am
caryn's picture
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Joined: 11/20/2002 - 09:00

my son also has a latex allegy and i have read that shea can be contraindicated with it so we stay away as a precaution.

Posted on: Thu, 04/12/2007 - 5:20am
MimiM's picture
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Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

I have to admit, I held my breath and let my son have the kissables with the shea oil in them. He had no problems. He has had them several times without incident since then, and I have used lotion with shea oil. Not a problem. I'm not necessarily recommending this to anyone because every situation is different. I am usually pretty strict about what I will and won't let him eat but this time, I did take the chance (with Epipens at hand of course!)

Posted on: Wed, 04/11/2007 - 4:47am
VariegatedRB's picture
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Joined: 11/23/2005 - 09:00

BUT- I believe there were some Kissable EGGS this year they had that DID not contain shea oil, because they were just plain old kissables (not the easter colors) inside.
So... read the label and if you aren't sure, call!
Tara P

Posted on: Wed, 04/11/2007 - 8:14am
JeannieLino's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/02/2005 - 09:00

Thanks everyone. Both my dad and sister threw out the bags. They didn't know that shea is a potential issue. They just knew that I had said Kissables are safe.
I will definately contact Hersheys to ask that they stop using shea.
Does anyone have a definate answer about shea? Is it a nut or a fruit (like cocanut) I have tried doing searches on the board, but am not getting anything (I am probably searching wrong
Thanks again for the responses!
Jeannie

Posted on: Wed, 04/11/2007 - 9:31am
Ethan Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/27/2006 - 09:00

I saw Dr. Wood (head of Johns Hopkins pediatric allergy dept.) speak this week at a MD food allergy support group meeting. He discussed the current food allergy research and then held an open Q & A section.
I specifically asked about shea nut b/c I had read conflicting info about whether to avoid or not. He said that shea nut is considered a tree nut and he has seen multiple reactions from those with TNA to shea. He said that he tells nut-allergic patients to avoid shea.
Another person asked about coconut - Dr. Wood replied that there has been ONE case report of a person with TNA and PA reacting ALSO to coconut and that the molecular structure of coconut has a minute section that is similiar to tree-nuts. However, he did specify that coconut is a fruit, not a tree-nut, so TNA people who react also have a coconut allergy as well as a TNA.
Hope that helps!

Posted on: Wed, 04/11/2007 - 5:50pm
gw_mom3's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/14/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Ethan Mom:
[b]I saw Dr. Wood (head of Johns Hopkins pediatric allergy dept.) speak this week at a MD food allergy support group meeting. He discussed the current food allergy research and then held an open Q & A section.
I specifically asked about shea nut b/c I had read conflicting info about whether to avoid or not. He said that shea nut is considered a tree nut and he has seen multiple reactions from those with TNA to shea. He said that he tells nut-allergic patients to avoid shea.
Another person asked about coconut - Dr. Wood replied that there has been ONE case report of a person with TNA and PA reacting ALSO to coconut and that the molecular structure of coconut has a minute section that is similiar to tree-nuts. However, he did specify that coconut is a fruit, not a tree-nut, so TNA people who react also have a coconut allergy as well as a TNA.
Hope that helps![/b]
Thanks for that info. My dd is avoiding shea nut per her allergist although she *may* have had it in Canadian coffee crisp anyway (I need to call Nestle Canada about that). I hope they can test her for it the next time we go.
------------------
==============
[b]~Gale~[/b]

Posted on: Thu, 04/12/2007 - 4:12am
caryn's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/20/2002 - 09:00

my son also has a latex allegy and i have read that shea can be contraindicated with it so we stay away as a precaution.

Posted on: Thu, 04/12/2007 - 5:20am
MimiM's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

I have to admit, I held my breath and let my son have the kissables with the shea oil in them. He had no problems. He has had them several times without incident since then, and I have used lotion with shea oil. Not a problem. I'm not necessarily recommending this to anyone because every situation is different. I am usually pretty strict about what I will and won't let him eat but this time, I did take the chance (with Epipens at hand of course!)

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