Just found out about soy allergy.. Could you pls. post some safe items?

Posted on: Wed, 03/17/2004 - 9:59am
KATHYANN's picture
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Joined: 09/29/2001 - 09:00

we just found out about James soy allergy today. would the people who are also dealing with soy give me a few hints to what to avoid and what is somewhat safe or even what to ask or look for ? I saw that the bread we use has it Sunbeam Is there a safe bread to use? I read that not everyone with soy allergy is allergic to soy lecthin How do I tell if he is? thanks so much right now I feel as helpless as I did 4 years ago with Pa. Kathy Ann

Posted on: Wed, 03/17/2004 - 12:07pm
Love my C's picture
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Joined: 04/03/2002 - 09:00

Kathy Ann,
I am sorry to hear about your son's new allergy to soy [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] My son is also soy allergic and unfortunately becoming more sensitive to it. I find that soy allergy is what limits us the most w/ foods. I don't avoid soy lecithin. For a long while I didn't avoid soy oil, however, my son now reacts to foods deep fried in soy oil or fried in Crisco, etc. So we eliminate as much as we can. I cook w/ corn oil.
Soy flour is in most breads & buns. I use Roman Meal bread w/o problems. There is soy flour in Krispy Kreme dounuts [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] and every donut place I've ever checked out. It's even in Bridgeford frozen bread roll dough.
Soy protein is in many pizza doughs. Even though Pizza Hut & Chuck E. Cheese don't list it on their ingredient lists, I have seen soy protein or soy flour on the package for their crust mix when I have asked to see it for myself in the restaurant.
It can also be in meats. I've seen it in hot dogs, chicken nuggets, roast beef at the deli counter, etc., packaged turkey slices, bacon, etc.
I've seen it in some candies also.
You will really need to read every label.
Make sure you stay away from "Hydrolized Vegetable Protein" which could be peanut or soy protein.
I hope with avoidance your son will be able to outgrow it soon! Here are a couple of links for you:
[url="http://www.calgaryallergy.ca/Articles/peanutsoyahp.htm#Soy%20(soya)"]http://www.calgaryallergy.ca/Articles/peanutsoyahp.htm#Soy%20(soya)[/url]
[url="http://www.labspec.co.za/l_legume.htm"]http://www.labspec.co.za/l_legume.htm[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 03/17/2004 - 12:09pm
wendysco's picture
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Joined: 05/03/2003 - 09:00

The only safe bread I have found is Kangaroo No-Fat pita pockets, we avoid oil and lecithin as well. If you can give me an idea as to what you are looking for specifically, maybe I can help. Soy is in a lot of things, but I think we have done pretty well, it has taken awhile to find as many things as we have. Some soy allergic can tolerate the oils and lecithins, I liken it to peanut/peanut oil, just not worth the risk. I have to say since we eliminated even the oil and lecithins from the house the mystery hives and eczema outbreaks are gone.
I make bread if we need it, I do everything right in the bowl to cut down on messing up the counters (I am lazy), pizza crust is quick and easy too. I use Crisco Canola oil for baking or frying donuts (rare occasions), and Carapelli olive oil for pizzas and pastas etc...
Some of our other snacks include Fritos, Wavy Lays plain, New Morning graham crackers, Cereals. We do use Breyer's All natural Vanilla, also chocolate, strawberry and Mint chocolate chip for me and hubby, kids only like vanilla and that's fine with me. HTH.
Wendy

Posted on: Wed, 03/17/2004 - 9:49pm
KATHYANN's picture
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Joined: 09/29/2001 - 09:00

thank you so much for the info. I felt terrible telling James last nite that he could no longer have Swirlwich after we just bought out the store. It was truly heartbreaking.I wonder what do we do say for Easter now and Halloween . We usually buy from Vermont for chocolate but see that soy lechtin is in all of it. Is there any safe chocolate for them to eat?I was also wondering can he get an anaphalactic reaction from soy too? When I called Lays they said only the plain chips had no soy lct. in it, do you worry about cross cont. the same with peanut ? Thanks again I know i am rambling I feel alittle out of sorts with all this.. Kathy Ann

Posted on: Wed, 03/17/2004 - 11:49pm
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

My son is 19 and has soy allergy on his list too but we have never noticed him reacting from it. I wonder if he eliminated soy would he notice something different?
Peg

Posted on: Thu, 03/18/2004 - 12:23am
wendysco's picture
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Joined: 05/03/2003 - 09:00

We have had good luck with Lays plain chips, I don't worry about nut contamination with them, there is always the possibility of soy, mostly oil I think, but if they clean AND it is the supposedly the protein free oil then the risk is low IMO. There is no soy and nut safe chocolate ANYWHERE, between myself and my sister we have e-mailed many places, if you ever find anything let us know.

Posted on: Thu, 03/18/2004 - 12:59am
DRobbins's picture
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Joined: 07/19/2001 - 09:00

Kathy Ann, I'm sorry to hear about your son's new soy allergy.
We went through the same thing -- started with a peanut allergy, and then progressed to a soy allergy.
When we first found out about my son's soy allergy, we carefully avoided soy lecithin and soybean oil. We had read that most people who are soy allergic could tolerate those things, but we weren't so sure.
After some number of months, we let my son try products with soy lecithin and later with soy oil, and he had no reactions. I have no idea if his immune system "calmed down" a bit or if he could have tolerated those items all along. We continued to avoid soy flour, soy protein isolate, hydrolyzed soy protein, etc. for several more months, and then, with his allergist's approval, tried foods that contained small amounts of those substances, and my son tolerated them with no trouble. However, I realize that we were just phenomenally lucky with that last group.
As far as whether an anaphylactic reaction to soy is possible, well, an anaphylactic reaction is possible to any allergen. As to whether it's likely, I'd say that depends on your son's allergy test scores and his past history of reactions. If he's ever had an anaphylactic reaction to any food, then I would certainly err on the side of caution and be very slow to introduce soy products of any form, even soy oil or lecithin.
Bread is certainly the biggest difficulty with a soy allergy. Have you considered getting a bread machine and baking your own? I reluctantly got one, and I have to admit, it's actually kind of fun. It's not hard at all -- believe me, I'm "domestically challenged" [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] -- and the results taste a lot better than the bread you get at the store.
Best of luck,
Debbie

Posted on: Fri, 03/19/2004 - 10:12am
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Joined: 05/11/2004 - 09:00

KathyAnn,
Did your allergist tell you to avoid soy lecithin and soy oil? If not, you may be putting yourself under unecessary limitations. My soy allergic son was told he can have soybean oil and lecithin, but not soy anything else, and that seems to work well for him. Most (but not all) soy allergic people can have soy lecithin and soybean oil.
To eliminate soy lecithin and oil is really narrowing the choices, and as my teenage son knows, soy lecithin is in all the candy!
I'd check with your allergist for clarity.
My son is also allergic to Peanut (>100) and Nuts.
[This message has been edited by KateB (edited March 19, 2004).]

Posted on: Fri, 03/19/2004 - 11:00am
maddiesmom's picture
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Joined: 12/20/1999 - 09:00

My 5 year old is PN/TN and soy allergic. At two years old she outgrew milk, eggs, and wheat but she still had loose poops (don't mean to be gross). We found out she was allergic to soy. It was, and is, extremely hard to avoid!! We try to avoid anything with the word soy in it...and when we are successful she knows the difference. If she eats something that we thought was safe, if she has upset tummy she will tell me that she has yucky stomach and that whatever she ate "must have had soy in it, mom!".
As people above have stated, it seems to be in everything. I think it is actually harder to avoid that pn/tn allergy. Her RAST numbers for soy have actually increased over the past 2 years and we are not sure why. The best we can do is avoid it as much as possible-but I wonder also...if her numbers/allergy gets higher, can it lead to an anaphylaxis reaction??
I am so very sorry that your child has this allergy also to deal with. This website is so very helpful and a wonderful tool. Good luck to you!
Shandra
(mom to Madeline-5 1/2 PN/TN and soy
Grant -2 no allergies (so far)

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