Just found out

Posted on: Tue, 11/14/2006 - 4:09am
cog's picture
cog
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Joined: 11/13/2006 - 09:00

What a day it was yesterday. I had suspected she had a food allergy because she vomited, got a hoarse voice and seemed to just be kinda out of it when she ate a peanuts. Even though I "knew" (my voice inside and reading PA.com.this week) Hubby thought she did not have an allergy so I did think perhaps I was wrong.

Anyway yesterday we received the call regarding her RAST score. They said it was a class 5, 40.7. "definitely an allergy" the nurse said. She started to end the call and I was like "hey what do we do? what does she eat" then she mentioned an allergist and how common it is. What a panic we have been in and we know by learning more we can keep out precious, princess loving, joke telling, talkative, loving little girl safe. It's so very scary and the fear won't get the best of us.

That's our story and we look forward to learning more about this whole thing as pretty much literally all we know is what we have read here. Will see allergist tomorrow

Posted on: Tue, 11/14/2006 - 4:57am
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Joined: 08/01/2006 - 09:00

Sorry to hear about your little girl, hope she's feeling better. Your story sounds exactly like ours- my husband didn't believe until we heard on the blood test- our daughter's symptoms were the same as your daughter's, but add coughing before getting hoarse and a few hives- her rast was a 46. I have found some of the most helpful information to be manufacturers that are good/bad, and reading about unexpected sources of peanuts. There are also some good books out there to read. We were only diagnosed in August- but are learning as we go. This website helps a lot!

Posted on: Tue, 11/14/2006 - 4:57am
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Joined: 08/01/2006 - 09:00

Sorry to hear about your little girl, hope she's feeling better. Your story sounds exactly like ours- my husband didn't believe until we heard on the blood test- our daughter's symptoms were the same as your daughter's, but add coughing before getting hoarse and a few hives- her rast was a 46. I have found some of the most helpful information to be manufacturers that are good/bad, and reading about unexpected sources of peanuts. There are also some good books out there to read. We were only diagnosed in August- but are learning as we go. This website helps a lot!

Posted on: Wed, 04/30/2008 - 1:35pm
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Joined: 02/05/2007 - 09:00

Hi,
There is so much. What have you found out so far have you been to an allergist? The good thing at that age is you have absolute controll over what they eat and even what they can get into. Is your little one in daycare? If so that can be quite overwhelming to deal with. I am assuming you have epinepherine (not sure in what form with one so little). I would recommend getting a book and reading up as much as you can. I really like Understanding and managing your childs food allergies by Scott Sicherer. Let us know if you have specific questions or things you are thinking about.

Posted on: Thu, 05/01/2008 - 8:30am
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Joined: 04/18/2008 - 07:42

We just "joined" the group a few weeks ago. My 4 yo daughter was diagnosed with a peanut allergy (after 3 years of just "disliking" peanut products, we thought). It's definitely normal to feel overwhelmed. We had our second allergist appointment yesterday, and it's only since then that I've started to feel a little better about it all. You do need 2 epipens, and benadryl to keep on hand. You also need to have a set to keep at daycare, etc...

Posted on: Thu, 05/01/2008 - 11:12am
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Joined: 04/30/2008 - 18:38

Thank you for responding. He was allergy tested on Monday and it is the only allergy he has. We were given the epi pens and he starts daycare next Tuesday part time. My main concern is understanding how to read labels. I have read a lot already and it just seems so confusing. Also, I don't think the allergist explained enough to me. He told me he was allergic to peanuts and gave a list of food to avoid, thats it. Everyone keeps asking me how allergic is he? I'm not sure what that means. I just respond with that he is allergic enough to need epi pens. Should the doctor have given me more information or is am I just suppose to figure it out on my own. Thanks book suggestion, I am going to buy it tomorrow.

Posted on: Fri, 05/02/2008 - 11:12am
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Joined: 01/16/2007 - 09:00

Hi sorry for the diagnosis. MY DS is 7 years old we found out when he was about 2. I gave him a bite of PB on toast he spit it right out and his lips becan to swell with in a minute.
Are you in the USA? There are food labeling laws in place that if a company uses peanuts in a product they have to list as an ingedient. It has to be clearly labelled with simple words ( not the scientific words). A lot of companies now put may contains labels.... I avoid those as well. It is my feeling that if they are telling you it may contain.. then it may contain and it is not worth the risk.
check lotions, shampoos and hand creme for nut ingediants too. a lot to learn but you will! it gets easier. I like the peanut allergy answer book by Dr Michael Young. easy reading.
good luck!

Posted on: Mon, 05/05/2008 - 4:05am
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Joined: 11/08/2007 - 09:44

WELCOME! Sorry about the diagnosis as it can be SO overwhelming. Wondering what the reaction *could* be I think is the hardest thing if your child hasn't ever had a reaction. When I found out about my DS's pna that was the biggest question in my mind. What would his reaction be? Would I know if he was having a reaction? When do I give the epi?
There is no way to determine what a reaction might be. There are people that get low scores on the blood test but can have ana. reaction and there are people that get high scores that might have nothing but some hives. Each reaction can be different too. A person might have hives one time but the next time have an ana. reaction. That is why I feel it is important to keep all pn/tn out of the house and stay away from all "may contains". From what I have read the size of the wheal on a SPT (skin prick test) or the numbers on a blood test (RAST) cannot indicate the type of reaction a person will have but possibly the likelyhood of having a reaction at all.
I know it doesn't seem like it now, but after some time you will find your comfort level and the "what if" type questions won't bother quite as much.

Posted on: Mon, 05/05/2008 - 6:18am
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Joined: 10/27/2001 - 09:00

Welcome to the board kmoths. I believe the pp's (previous posters) provided excellent info. so I will just add that I understand how overwhelming the diagnosis can be. Please remember that we all remember that initial time and are here to help.

Posted on: Sun, 09/01/2013 - 9:29pm
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Joined: 01/16/2007 - 09:00

Hi There,
Unfortunately, some of the exclusive peanut free companies are more expensive than regular brands. We get some treats for the holidays from Vermont Nut Free and other snacks from Peanut Free planet. The shipping is the expensive part . That said, I get a lot of other things from regular brands. Start checking labels, some of the companies are good about listing "may contains." Call the manufactures and see what their policy is for labeling. Some companies label for may contains and made in the same facility... If they have a strict policy to label accordingly then I trust that there isn't any if it doesn't say so. I started to keep a spreadsheet of the manufacturers policy and would buy products from them before I would buy from others. You still have to read labels every time incase something has changed. Good Luck. It is manageable. My son is almost 13 has not had a serious reaction is several years.

Posted on: Mon, 09/02/2013 - 9:25pm
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Joined: 08/16/2013 - 05:42

Hi Sherri - No store made/purchased food is 100% safe. You need to read labels, every label, even on food that your child has eaten before, read the label. If in doubt, go without. Occasionally we will eat at a restaurant, but I make most of what my child eats at home, thus I know that it is completely safe. Talk to your pediatrician for a list of items to avoid. Call the food manufacturers if you have questions about certain products, ie ingredients, processing, etc.

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