\"Just a little allergic\"

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 12:28am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

Last night we had visitors and we all met up at the Magic Castle in Hollywood.

[url="http://www.magiccastle.com/"]http://www.magiccastle.com/[/url]

As we were waiting for dinner there were a bunch of (how to describe the Hollywood type that just for tonight left their designer dogs home?)twenty something socialites at the table behind ours.

DS and I overheard them talking about peanut allergies so our ears perked up. One girl was saying [b]"I am just a little bit allergic, not like those kids you have to jam the needle into. I just get hives all over and itch for days. I can have snickers bars as long as I don't mind the itching."[/b]

DS had just given his spiel to the wait staff and I doubt the others overheard him but we just sat there dumbfounded.

The funny part, she had this high pitched voice. During the meal she began that little annoying cough in the back of her throat and by the time we left her voice was husky, a definite change.

I kept waiting for her to keel over.

Unfortunately she sounded like she was never taught one thing about PA and she's probably the same age as my DS. I know when he was diagnosed there was NOTHING out there about PA. We did a medline search at the medical library for our information, and that was sketchy at best.

I felt sorry for her and annoyed by her at the same time.

Peg

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 12:39am
Greenlady's picture
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Joined: 06/30/2004 - 09:00

Wow, Peg. Denial can be a pretty strong force! I would have be very tempted to go over an say something, but I understand why you didn't. I hope she learns before it's too late.

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 1:39am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Wow!! I thought I was "just a little allergic when I had migranes" - that is until I learned that all the other medical issues I was experiencing were also related.
This poor girl definately needs a tutorial!!

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 2:11am
Kelly H's picture
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Joined: 09/11/2007 - 09:00

This happened when I let my daughter have a sleep over at our house. I talked with every Mom on the phone when the called to RSVP and then asked about things like food allergies, medicines, etc. One mom (who was also a paramedic) told me that her daughter was allergic to PN but that she could have them once in a while. Told me that she didn't have epi and didn't need one. Then said that she really wasn't sure if her daughter was allergic to PN because when they did the skin test at the dr. office her back swelled up soo bad that they couldn't tell which allergy was which. As I stood there on the other line of the phone with my jaw dropped to the ground thinking this was a paramedic I told her that our house was PN/TN free so she didn't have to worry and if worse came to worse I do have 6 epi pens in the house. She then calmly said back to me "Oh I'm not worried because she eats PN all the time with no problems"
Talk about denial!!!
------------------
Kelly H

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 2:44am
TwokidsNJ's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2005 - 09:00

DS had a girl in his preschool that was " just a little allergic" to dairy. Mom used to have epipen but let it expire and didn't bother to renew.
IF she has dairy (like the Cheezits they served in preschool) she "just gets a little cough and keeps clearning her throat". Mom thinks she is outgrowing.
Interestingly, she could be almost doing the Duke-style tolerance test by feeding her small, increasing amounts of her allergen. Maybe this will help her outgrow. ON the other hand, maybe she'll have anaphylaxis. The cough is just not a good sign, to me. Any thoughts on how big a worry this is (I worried about this girl all the time)? Mom was definitely in denial.
On the side, I told the Director if she ever needs to use my DS' epipen for an emergency with any child, she could use it under the Good Samaritan law.

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 3:25am
perpetually perplexed's picture
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Joined: 02/12/2005 - 09:00

HI Peg,
I am so sorry that this happened on a fun night out. It was probably very frustrating for you and your son to listen to that without interrupting and educating. I hope you had an enjoyable evening anyway.
Now, just for fun: What would you have done if the reaction would have escalated? I have always wondered how I would react in a similar situation as we know a few that don't think anything about their PA except that it is annoying and inconvient. How long do we "hang back" and watch before offering EPI? Do we become proactive immediately? Do we offer to inject the Epi ourselves? What about being sued for interfering? I think that I personally would offer the Epi immediately and deal with the other stuff afterwards. I hope none of us are ever put in this position.
And finally, Thank You Peg for posting your experiences. They are always helpful. I have learned so much from your post in the past. I see my PA DS's future and bet they will have many of the same situations as you have already experienced and been through. It is some what of a comfort to have a little "heads up" of things.
PP

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 4:00am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

DS and I had a big conversation about offering his epi pen to someone who needed one and did not have one.
The jury is still out on how legal we think that is. I don't think we came to a conclusion last night.
DS will cross that bridge when he gets to it I guess.
Peg

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 4:02am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

And thank you for the kind words perpetually perplexed!
Peg

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 4:18am
Christabelle's picture
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Joined: 10/03/2004 - 09:00

Darwin. Darwin in action.
What else can be said?

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 8:22am
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Anonymous (not verified)

Quote:Originally posted by perpetually perplexed:
[b]Now, just for fun: What would you have done if the reaction would have escalated? I have always wondered how I would react in a similar situation as we know a few that don't think anything about their PA except that it is annoying and inconvient. How long do we "hang back" and watch before offering EPI? Do we become proactive immediately? Do we offer to inject the Epi ourselves? What about being sued for interfering? I think that I personally would offer the Epi immediately and deal with the other stuff afterwards. I hope none of us are ever put in this position.
PP[/b]
One of the first things my doctor told me after prescribing EpiPens was, "You may never use them, but you could save someone else's life, just by having them."
It made me feel better to know that I could help someone else, and there was one instance where I would have administered one - if I had not been in a hospital thinking that the nurses would do something soon.

Posted on: Mon, 09/17/2007 - 8:42am
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Anonymous (not verified)

I just did a search on the Good Samaritan Laws in my state, and I think I would be able to administer a pen in an emergency. However, that does not mean the person would not still try to sue if they felt like it - but our law says that, if the person responding "in good faith" does not receive compensation, they are not liable for any civil damages.

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