Its definitely a peanut allergy...

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I was loading the dishwasher today and my 13 month old was "helping" like he always does (removing the silverware from the basket). I looked down and he had a knife in his hand and put it in his mouth... we don't put sharp knives in the dishwasher so there was no risk of him cutting himself but when I took the knife away from him I noticed it had peanut butter on it (my 3 year old had a pb&j for lunch yesterday). Within 15 minutes he was drooling all over the place and his tongue swelled up really big and he had hives on his face and hand that was holding the knife. I immediately gave him benedryl and called the Dr. Thank God the benedryl worked because the ped's office didn't call me back for 45 minutes!!!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/mad.gif[/img]

He had an appt tomorrow with our ped to get an epi-pen jr script and to look at his eczema that I was having troubles controlling (which ironically looks better after the benedryl now).

So now what?? How do I find good avoidance lists?? I've skimmed posts on here and seen different products (many of which surprised me) but haven't seen any comprehensive lists... is there one available????? What else do I need to do?????

On Jun 21, 2006

I would consider a new doctor. 1. They love writing scrips. I am disappointed you didnt get one the first time and 2. 45 minutes! Sounds very similar to our first reaction to the corner of a pb cracker. With our first reaction, I called the dr. office and they dragged a doctor out of a room and put them on the phone with me. The doctor was very concerned. I didnt even know what was going on....why would he be turning blue? Its not ironic at all that the eczema is clearing up with benedryl. Eczema flare ups are typically a reaction to an allergen, kinda like hives. I would see an allergist over a ped. You are the customer here(your son), find a good one that you like. You will become an expert label reader. Read them ALL every time. Dig in here....there is so much to see. ask, we were all where you are once! Good Luck

On Jun 21, 2006

And please be sure you keep an eye on him. When my nephew had his first reaction, they sent him home after getting all the meds at the ER. I warned my SIL to check on him later, about the time the Benadryl would be wearing off (4-6 hours). Sure enough, the hives started to come back. Luckily, she had more Benadryl.

I sometimes have to dose for a couple of days following a reaction. It just takes a while for all that histamine to get out of your system.

Take care, and do not hesitate to call 911 if his symptoms get more serious. Daisy

On Jun 23, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by brown1442: [b]So now what?? How do I find good avoidance lists?? I've skimmed posts on here and seen different products (many of which surprised me) but haven't seen any comprehensive lists... is there one available????? What else do I need to do????? [/b]

Make sure you have at *least* two epipens, and that you carry two of them, plus Benedryl, with you everywhere you go. Best to have two for home and to for you to carry.

This site is the best educational resource for the allergy you will find. Seriously, I can't believe all that I have learned here over the years.

Short list of things to avoid:

bakery items ice cream from shops like Dairy Queen, etc Asian food

Read/do a search in the manufacturer's section, you'll find lists of trusted brands.

On Jun 23, 2006

I forgot to add - make sure you take your child to see an allergist for testing immediately! Many kids with PA have other food allergies as well. A good pediatric allergist will test your child for all of the common allergens.

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