It just makes me wonder...

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 11:25am
Ree's picture
Ree
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Melissa posted the outstanding news of her ds' results from the Duke study (congrats!!). What I'm wondering is, if the food challenge desensitization is really bringing the numbers down, then why would strict avoidance for *certain* food allergies be the recommendation? I'm not thinking of PA, but MA or EA. If someone is tolerating milk in products, but reacts mildly or moderately to straight milk, wouldn't you think they would encourage you to continue to eat those products? Or, can tolerate cooked eggs, but not raw. This is my ds' situation with egg and it's something I've questioned since he was diagnosed. I do practice strict avoidance, but I'm afraid the professionals will turn around 5 yrs from now and say "oops. you shouldn't have strictly avoided. Sorry, but now your child has a lifelong milk allergy."

Does anyone else wonder the same thing?

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 12:06pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Ree:
[b]Melissa posted the outstanding news of her ds' results from the Duke study (congrats!!). What I'm wondering is, if the food challenge desensitization is really bringing the numbers down, then why would strict avoidance for *certain* food allergies be the recommendation? I'm not thinking of PA, but MA or EA. If someone is tolerating milk in products, but reacts mildly or moderately to straight milk, wouldn't you think they would encourage you to continue to eat those products? Or, can tolerate cooked eggs, but not raw. This is my ds' situation with egg and it's something I've questioned since he was diagnosed. I do practice strict avoidance, but I'm afraid the professionals will turn around 5 yrs from now and say "oops. you shouldn't have strictly avoided. Sorry, but now your child has a lifelong milk allergy."
Does anyone else wonder the same thing?[/b]
i think you have to remember that the desensitization studies being done are in extremely controlled settings versus the random feeding of certain foods to an allergic child.
i'm in the strictly avoid camp. these studies show extreme promise and if (hopefully when) they are ready to be "rolled out" to the general allergic public, i would feel comfortable then (and only then) exposing my child to a given allergen because i will know under what circumstances (dosage, etc.) it should be given.
just my opinion.

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 12:36pm
Carefulmom's picture
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We were the ones with the Van De Kamps incident. You probably remember. That proved that strict avoidance is the key. Cap rast was falling. Then after all those trace exposures to milk, cap rast went up 250%.

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 9:45pm
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I agree w/ Shoshana...I don't think random exposures help at all in outgrowing, but I do think the answer will be in the controlled, slowly increasing amounts of exposure, just like in allergy shots, as we have seen in our study. I would guess that is how your body slowly "learns" to identify the allergen and see it as "ok", but when you just have a random exposure here and there your body doesn't get the chance to "get used to" the allergen...
not a dr, just relating our experience w/ the study.
Melissa

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 9:45pm
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I know what you guys are saying, and I wouldn't chance what I'm doing now. I think those are the responses I need to hear. But, I just can't help but wonder.
I think what gets me is that I know people who continued to give milk in products and their kids already outgrew milk (by age 3). Why? I just don't get it.
Shoshana18 - How are you and your father doing? Did you make it to Chicago yet?
[This message has been edited by Ree (edited December 12, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 10:18pm
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Joined: 02/26/2006 - 09:00

i guess im in the minority here. we dont practice strict avoidence with all of my sons allergies..
we absloutly do not have anything with peanuts, strawberry or blueberry in it the reaction was to severe, but with dairy its pick and choose. he cant have any straight dairy. ie milk, yogert, cheese... but he can have butter, and some foods that contain dairy in them like cake and waffels.
our allergist told us that if its not bothering him than its ok.
erin

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 10:57pm
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Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

This has been a confusing topic for me as well.
My ds tested allergic to peanuts, several tree nuts, soy, egg whites, 2 types of shellfish.
Actually had an ana reaction to peanuts.
We did not strictly avoid eggs or soy. He never ate shellfish before the testing.
He outgrew the shellfish, eggs.
I see the effects of allergy shots for the environment that's for sure. He used to get so sick in the spring from the pollen. His eyes would swell and sometimes it would induce asthma attacks.
This year, nothing....no problems on even the worst days. He also doesn't have mystery hives which I don't know if it's because we have a handle on his food allergies or if a lot of the hives were from environmental allergies.

Posted on: Tue, 12/12/2006 - 1:02am
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Joined: 12/01/2006 - 09:00

I think the whole point is that the Duke study is just that--a study. Could change the way allergists advise patients and could change treatment options. But the exposures in the Duke study are highly controlled, unlike the sorts of exposures you/we could achieve through food, and until they get some good results and then replicate them a few times and then establish a protocol for treatment, strict avoidance is still the recommended and advisable action.
That said, my DD tested positive for an egg white allergy along with the peanuts, but she ate eggs regularly, although she had one reaction to some mousse that contained uncooked egg whites (and I'm still pissed about that one--I TOLD my sister not to give her any; she was just over a year old and had already had the peanut reaction so I wasn't taking any chances but my stupid sister gave her a bite of the mousse anyway, which also contained weird things like cardamom and nutmeg for God's sake, and of course she had an allergic reaction). We were surprised at the test results for the eggs, but the doctor explained how proteins can be altered by cooking and it was entirely possible to be allergic to raw egg whites but not cooked eggs, so we've continued to let her eat cooked eggs. But in that case it was pretty clear that the test results were only partially accurate. I don't think I would have risked exposure to something I was sure she was allergic to.
Sarah

Posted on: Tue, 12/12/2006 - 1:17am
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Joined: 12/10/2002 - 09:00

Not sure why your allergist would tell you to avoid cooked egg when the allergy is to raw egg, the protein changes a lot with heat.
We had the same situations with DS extremely allergic to raw egg and not at all to cooked. Allergist told us to just avoid raw egg, (or undercooked egg as in gooey cookies) and let him have all the cooked egg he wanted.
DS never ate eggs by themselves, but never avoided baking or french toast.
He is no longer allergic to raw egg, but I don't think it's because we let him eat cooked egg, I think he is just one of those kids that outgrew it.

Posted on: Tue, 12/12/2006 - 6:05am
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Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

Currently, my thoughts are:
Avoidance of allergens avoids a reaction. It has NO bearing on if an allergy is to be outgrown or not.
If you are getting trace amounts (NOT talking about 'may contains...' - Im talking foods WITH the allergen), and your RAST goes up/down -- it has no correlation.
Caitlins scores for some products went up, some went down. No ingestion of either.
Why?
Because.
No other reason, IMO.
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Fri, 12/15/2006 - 9:37am
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Joined: 03/14/2003 - 09:00

Hi Ree. My non pa ds has a severe egg allergy. He can tolerate them cooked so I've let him have them in baked goods, etc. I just saw this article online, which seems to agree.
[url="http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061215/LIFE11/61215025/1006/LIFE"]http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061215/LIFE11/61215025/1006/LIFE[/url]
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Increased exposure tames childhood egg allergy
Posted by the Asbury Park Press on 12/15/06
HEALTHDAY
Children who were allergic to eggs were able to overcome the allergy by gradually
increasing the amount of egg they ate, U.S. researchers say.
"Participants who took a daily dose of egg product over the two-year study period were able to build up their bodies' resistance to the point where most of them could eat two scrambled eggs without a reaction,'' researcher Dr. A. Wesley Burks, chief of the division of allergy and immunology at Duke University Medical Center, said in a prepared statement.
The small pilot study involved seven youngsters, ages 1 to 7. The children consumed small daily doses of powdered egg mixed with food. At the start of the study, the doses were the equivalent of less than one-thousandth of an egg. That was gradually increased to the equivalent of one-tenth of an egg, which was maintained as a "maintenance dose'' for the remainder of the study.
The study was published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and was expected to be in the January print edition of the journal.
Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies among children in the United States. While most children outgrow the allergy by age 5, some have the allergy for the rest of their lives.
This study was the first in a series of food allergy desensitization studies being
conducted by researchers at Duke and the University of Arkansas. One of the studies is examining whether the desensitization method is effective in children with peanut allergies.

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