is FALCPA backfiring?

Posted on: Mon, 01/09/2006 - 2:47pm
starlight's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2004 - 09:00

Just looking for some opinions, do you think that FALCPA is going to backfire on us, with more CYA labelling from companies who don't understand FALCPA?

The reason I ask is because today my father came home from work (he's an assistant manager in a major grocery store) and he told me he could not find one package of cookies without a "manufactured in a facility w/ tree nuts" or "may contain tree nuts" statement on the label (although I asked about the chips ahoy and oreos and he hadn't checked those). Like Salerno's Butter Cookies (the ones shaped like flowers with the hole in the middle) now have a warning for tree nuts. I grew up on those cookies.

It doesn't matter too much about the butter cookies because I'm not TNA so as long as they don't have a peanut statement I'll still have them, but is it going to become impossible to find stuff to eat? I've never reacted to cross-contamination or trace amounts, so I was fine with companies not labelling "may contain" if the peanuts are used in a different part of the building, but I don't eat things that have warning labelling. I live on cereals and cookies, and those are the things I imagine are the most likely to get label changes.

For adults with PA, if it DOES become an out of control CYA situation, will you take the chance and continue to eat what you always did or will you try to adjust to an even more restricted diet?

Posted on: Mon, 01/09/2006 - 3:35pm
ElleMo's picture
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Joined: 06/19/2003 - 09:00

I haven't found this is an issue for me so far. I call companies and ask about their manufacturing processes before I buy anything. So any products that suddenly have a "may contain" label that I have seen were products I wouldn't have purchased anyway. (e.g. Twinkies manufactured in the NJ plant)
As an FYI the "may contain" labeling is NOT required by FALCPA, although many companies may think it is.
Quote:Originally posted by starlight:
[b]Just looking for some opinions, do you think that FALCPA is going to backfire on us, with more CYA labelling from companies who don't understand FALCPA?
The reason I ask is because today my father came home from work (he's an assistant manager in a major grocery store) and he told me he could not find one package of cookies without a "manufactured in a facility w/ tree nuts" or "may contain tree nuts" statement on the label (although I asked about the chips ahoy and oreos and he hadn't checked those). Like Salerno's Butter Cookies (the ones shaped like flowers with the hole in the middle) now have a warning for tree nuts. I grew up on those cookies.
It doesn't matter too much about the butter cookies because I'm not TNA so as long as they don't have a peanut statement I'll still have them, but is it going to become impossible to find stuff to eat? I've never reacted to cross-contamination or trace amounts, so I was fine with companies not labelling "may contain" if the peanuts are used in a different part of the building, but I don't eat things that have warning labelling. I live on cereals and cookies, and those are the things I imagine are the most likely to get label changes.
For adults with PA, if it DOES become an out of control CYA situation, will you take the chance and continue to eat what you always did or will you try to adjust to an even more restricted diet? [/b]

Posted on: Tue, 01/10/2006 - 1:03am
bethc's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

I haven't seen a lot of new warning labels on things we buy. Someone mentioned bread in another thread, but that hasn't happened with our usual brands; I haven't checked others. With at least one product, we've started using it again because the label is now more specific. So we now know it doesn't have peanut ingredients, whereas before the type of lecithin wasn't specified. So far, so good with our shopping.

Posted on: Tue, 01/10/2006 - 6:22am
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

There are two other threads related to this - one is about Costco Yogurt under Manufacturers, and I can't remember where the other one is.
Yes, I've seen an explosion of "Made in a facility that..." and it completely p*sses me off. I want to know what it means, and so far it seems to mean is that I have to keep calling only to get more ambiguous info, LOL.
I emailed FAAN about two weeks ago asking them to address this, and so far I haven't heard anything back. Perhaps you'd like to try as well.
Believe me, I feel your pain.
Amy

Posted on: Tue, 01/10/2006 - 7:30am
palofmine's picture
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Joined: 11/07/2005 - 09:00

I shop at Wegmans, and other health food stores now. All baked goods we make here from scratch, waffles, pancakes taste quite nasty GLUTEN free, without syrup. I have adjusted our diet, but I'm not going to search thru regular grocery stores checking labels, when I can go to a health store and get the same thing, end up paying more, and not have to worry about checking the label, becuase those foods are clearly labeld , egg free, wheat free, soy free,nut free and milk free, they also taste pretty good.

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 2:37am
Lidia's picture
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Joined: 04/25/1999 - 09:00

I am thinking the same thing. If there is a warning about "made in a facility"...but then find out that the food is made on a different line and there is no risk it is very ambiguous. Especially for a ten year old! Also, it is concerning for caregivers and/or teachers. I am worried that this new system will limit our options even further.
Time will tell. I think FAAN will be happy about it from an informational standpoint, but from a "living with FA standpoint" I think it may make it more difficult.

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 3:13am
momofmatthew's picture
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Joined: 09/06/2005 - 09:00

palofmine, just a little bit of information, my ds is severely allergic to wheat and possibly celiac, he was repeatedly sick after eating "wheat free" waffles from vans. Because of the new labeling laws, they now have a disclaimer that they are made on the same equipment as wheat products (thats how we found out wahat the culprit was). We eliminated this waffle and he has not been sick since (almost 3months). So even plainly labeled packages need to be scrutinized.
Kathy

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 3:41am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I absolutely disagree (from our personal perspective) with "in a facility" warnings being purely CYA... We, too, require this level of awareness. Really. I realize that many do not, and I am sure this is frustrating for you. BUT-- please think about how much safer life is for kids like mine before you blanket such statements as "totally unnecessary," OK?
We ALWAYS know when one of our regular products changes to share a production line. We know because even if the label DOESN'T say so, my daughter knows. Most companies will verify it when we call. And this is certainly not required under FALCPA.
What would I personally like to see happen? I think that ultimately, there are many many people who probably DO tolerate traces of their allergens in products just fine. So the FDA needs to define what exactly "traces" means and issue a guideline about when it needs to be used (ie- shared lines or in a facility). Because right now it can mean anything from "below the detection limit of our test" to "large visible chunks of the allergen might be found." This is where the real problem lies, in my opinion.
So I think that we need to know that there are traces and what the maximum is for that word to be used. If you are not sensitive (ie- haven't reacted to the product in the past) then call them and find out if this is a change in production or just an improvement in labeling. Comfort zone, you know?
Sorry, but given all the trace exposures that we have to live with because of a lack of "in a facility" or "shared lines" warnings, you won't get much sympathy for this kind of labeling being a PITA. Just agreement that calling about it sure is. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 5:14am
robinlp's picture
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Joined: 05/14/2002 - 09:00

I think it may w/ some businesses. I went to The Fresh Market the other day and EVERYTHING that was prepared on the premisis said..."may contain wheat,dairy, soy, treenuts, peanuts and eggs"
I was so upset since it looks like a blanket label to cover their butts...so now everything is off limits to us.

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 7:00am
samirosenjacken's picture
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Joined: 09/30/2002 - 09:00

Dr. Wood addressed this question about our support group meeting. Basically, he said to trust the warning labels now. So if you bought a food without a warning label before but it now has one, don't continue buying it. He said some companies may actually change their procedures with double cleanings etc.. because now they have the warning to fall back on.
And.. he did say they see lots of reactions due to "may contain" statements. He strongly encouraged avoiding any food with the warning.

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 7:02am
Lidia's picture
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Joined: 04/25/1999 - 09:00

I agree that it will be easier and cheaper for many companies to blanket the warning on all their products rather than conduct safe manufacturing procedures. Even though there are peanuts in a facility, the product can be considered safe, no matter how sensitive you are. my child does react to trace amounts. I give him Hershey kisses, but not KitKat. Kisses do not have a warning and Kit KitKats do. When I originally asked, they were made in the same facility, but in different rooms than the pb containing products. They have strict manufacturing practices that I deem to be safe (my comfort zone). Will this new system require them to label the kisses differently?

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