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Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 12:30am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

In my estimation it is extremely dangerous to induce vomiting in anyone who is in trouble medically, or soon to be. Anything can happen. Vomit or water can go into the lungs and then you have a big problem.
Can you imagine peanut vomit in the lungs?
On this board we are dealing mostly with little children. Please think twice (more like 100 times) before you even consider inducing vomiting without medical advice.
Use the epi pen, Benadryl, call 911. Until you have been instructed otherwise by your physician.
Peggy

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 1:04am
mommyofmatt's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2004 - 09:00

No worries, I don't see me trying to do any of these things with my four year old son, I was just kind of wondering out loud.
For us, it will be epi, 911, ambulance, hospital. Meg

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 1:39am
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

I don`t think he/she is really a physician. Look at #2. Epi is anything but slow. Anyone who has used it would know that.

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 1:43am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

If this person is speaking from personal experience then fine but I have an issue with someone telling us that epi does not work but Dristan and Vomiting are good ideas.
That might be what works for this person but we have to make our own ways with PA and right now Epi and Benadryl and 911 work for me.
Peg

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 2:24am
mharasym's picture
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Joined: 04/20/2001 - 09:00

Take a look at the posters name - N8Healer - sounds like NAET to me - Nambudripad's Allergy Elimination Technique - a very controversial approach to "elimination" of allergy.
My advice - Stay FAR, FAR away from this. I think it is not only bad advise, but could infact be quite dangerous.
Beware!
Margaret

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 4:30am
toomanynuts's picture
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Joined: 08/23/2003 - 09:00

I too would disagree with that method first posted. I would also have to say that Naet doesn't teach that method either. When dd or myself has accidentally ingested an allergen due to cross contamination both of our first response is either vomiting. Not induced though it just happened. Our doctor recommended that at exposure, cross contamination or reaction to take benadryl as quickly as possible but to also use the epi. I would never recommended the advise given. Maybe it works for him but that approach sounds like you are gambling with your life.
Blessings to all to stay nut free, safe and listen to your own doctors advise.
toomanynuts

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 6:43am
ajgauthier's picture
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Joined: 04/13/2005 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Peg541:
[b]When my son had his first reaction he also vomited later on. The vomit brought the peanuts back up his esophagus into his mouth and sinuses almost totally closing off his airway.
I am very hesitant to recommend induced vomiting in a person who is already in trouble.
Peg[/b]
I agree with that, and after reading some more thoughts I probably wouldn't induce vomiting. However, I my allergist did say to me that drinking water or juice or something does help the stomache deal with the peanut protein.
In all my ingestion reactions though, vomiting just happened. My stomache filled with this mucus-nastiness as a natural protection mechanism (like how your nose will run/stuff up) and you can't help but vomit when that happens. Something to possibly be aware/cautious of for sure.
But yeah, aspirating peanut protein directly into the lungs would not be good.
I'll count my lucky stars that didn't happen to me.
Adrienne
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 11:05am
luvmyboys's picture
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Joined: 05/25/2006 - 09:00

During DS 1st anaphylactic rxn (before diagnosis so no epi and no clue what was happening) he vomited and then wanted lots to drink...he was 2 yrs old. Maybe the body instinctually knows to dilute what's in the stomach? Anyhow, would you follow your child's instincts and allow drinking of lots of fluid knowing it may induce vomiting, which could be dangerous? My tendency is to trust their instinct but it concerns me this could be dangerous. What are the chances of aspirating the vomit? Has this ever happened to anyone?
Luvmyboys

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 12:25pm
ajgauthier's picture
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Joined: 04/13/2005 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by luvmyboys:
[b]During DS 1st anaphylactic rxn (before diagnosis so no epi and no clue what was happening) he vomited and then wanted lots to drink...he was 2 yrs old. Maybe the body instinctually knows to dilute what's in the stomach? Anyhow, would you follow your child's instincts and allow drinking of lots of fluid knowing it may induce vomiting, which could be dangerous? My tendency is to trust their instinct but it concerns me this could be dangerous. What are the chances of aspirating the vomit? Has this ever happened to anyone?
Luvmyboys[/b]
I'm not sure if my instinct to drink was of thirst or to try to get the "taste of peanut" out of my mouth/throat...the taste of hives.
In any event, I just wanted to drink drink drink, which of course made it easier to vomit.
Adrienne
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 12:48pm
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

The original poster appears to be a fraud. This "treatment" could kill somebody. It does nothing to combat anaphylactic shock, which is caused by a drastic drop in blood pressure. Epinephrine is the only treatment that will contract the blood vessels and reverse shock. Also, has anyone ever tried to spray anything on their vocal cords? I can't even see mine! Let's get real here. This person should not be giving medical advice, and the "N8" (=NAET) in his name is huge tip-off.
Cathy

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