Information source for you

Posted on: Mon, 07/16/2001 - 2:22am
ImmunoCAPAllergyBloodTest's picture
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Joined: 07/16/2001 - 09:00

Hi Everybody,

your site is new to me, but I want to provide you with an additional information source about testing. My name is Lorraine, and I am the Product Manager for Allergy & Instrumentation, at Pharmacia Diagnostics, the worldleader in allergy diagnostics, and the maker of the ImmunoCAP

Posted on: Mon, 07/16/2001 - 2:43am
Heather's picture
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Joined: 10/08/2006 - 09:00

Wow, thank you so much for that information. Last year my son had a RAST test, this year I hope to get him a CAP RAST test - when comparing the results, am I comparing apples and oranges?

Posted on: Mon, 07/16/2001 - 5:07am
ImmunoCAPAllergyBloodTest's picture
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Joined: 07/16/2001 - 09:00

Dear Heather,
Both tests measure specific IgE, an antibody that an allergic persons' body produces when exposed to an allergen. It has more to do with older technology versus a newer one; improved sensitivity and precision. ImmunoCAP Specific IgE blood tests offer scientists and clinicians accurate, reproducible, quantitative results. Recently two scientific journals (Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology [url="http://www.us.pharmaciadiagnostics.com/us_news.asp?htmlID=56"]http://www.us.pharmaciadiagnostics.com/us_news.asp?htmlID=56[/url] , and Annals of Allergy [url="http://www.us.pharmaciadiagnostics.com/us_news.asp?htmlID=397"]http://www.us.pharmaciadiagnostics.com/us_news.asp?htmlID=397[/url] , thought it significant enough to publish a study comparing allergy blood tests offered at various labs. Labs offering ImmunoCAP, provided results closest to those of an ideal assay, others did not. Doctors ordering the blood test, need to make sure labs are using the latest technology i.e. ImmunoCAP Specific IgE blood test, not the old RAST tests, to ensure they are getting accurate reliable results.
Side note: Depending on the laboratory where the blood sample is processed, results will be presented in either quantitative (kUA/L, class results), or semi-quantiative (%Reference, class results). Dr. Hugh Sampson, a well respected pediatric allergist, has been using ImmunoCAP Specific IgE testing technology for his studies for many years. His studies concerning food allergy, make use of the quantitaive ImmunoCAP kUA/L results, and discuss the importance of knowing this information in predicting future disease.
Here is a link to one of his May 2001 published article "Utility of food-specific IgE concentrations in predicting symptomatic food allergy": [url="http://www.harcourthealth.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=abs&id=a114708&nav=abs&special=hilite&query=%5Bcontribs%5D%28sampson%2C%29"]http://www.harcourthealth.com/scripts/om...28sampson%2C%29[/url]
Note: this test has been available to specialists since 1989, but primary care physicians just don't know about it. Some specialists think it is the same as RAST and just are not informed.
Some other Web site resources are:
[url="http://www.IsItAllergy.com"]www.IsItAllergy.com[/url]
[url="http://www.US.PharmaciaDiagnostics.com"]www.US.PharmaciaDiagnostics.com[/url]
[url="http://www.PharmaciaDiagnostics.com"]www.PharmaciaDiagnostics.com[/url]
[url="http://www.FoodAllergy.org"]www.FoodAllergy.org[/url]
_______________
Lorraine
Quote:Originally posted by Heather:
[b]Wow, thank you so much for that information. Last year my son had a RAST test, this year I hope to get him a CAP RAST test - when comparing the results, am I comparing apples and oranges?[/b]

Posted on: Tue, 07/17/2001 - 1:23am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Hi Lorraine and thank you for this information. I've searched your site but I didn't find conclusive information concerning interpretation of results. Many people on this site question whether a higher result means a higher, or more severe reaction (in particular to peanut allergy). For example my son recently had the CAP-RAST test looking for just legume allergies. His results were 93.5 for peanut and 37.5 for peas. My allergist told me my son would "probably" not be airborne sensitive as that is typically Class VI but that he would definitely be contact sensitive. I am happy with my allergist and thought he did a great job of discussing Philip's allergies.
Do you have any reference material you could point us to that would provide us this conclusive type information? It seems many other allergists issue numbers without explaining what they mean. Is there such a thing as a definitive chart that correlates CAP-RAST scores with potential reactions?
Again thank you for coming on this site and provide concrete information concerning a commonly misunderstood topic.

Posted on: Tue, 07/17/2001 - 6:25am
mschleimer's picture
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Joined: 07/17/2001 - 09:00

Is this test available through dr's in Canada? My allergist said that my son would have to wait til he is 5 to get any testing. He is only 2 right now.
Thanks.

Posted on: Tue, 07/17/2001 - 11:10pm
ImmunoCAPAllergyBloodTest's picture
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Joined: 07/16/2001 - 09:00

Dear Dave,
I have passed your question to my colleague at Pharmacia Diagnostics Canada. The test is available nationally and they will be able to provide you with a local physicians' name or location where you can bring your son for testing. This test measure the presence of specific antibodies (IgE) to allergens. An allergen could be eaten (foods), inhaled (pollens), injected (insect bites or drugs), etc. For children, the majority of allergies are related to foods with antibody development occurring as early as a few months of age. It is particularly important to identify any sensitivities your son may have, in order to avoid exposure to those items. Allergy is a progressive disease. Limiting exposure early, could prevent problems with pollen allergy or even asthma in the future. Just so you have it, the phone number for Pharmacia Diagnostics Canada is 1-800-661-3198.
Lorraine
Quote:Originally posted by mschleimer:
[b]Is this test available through dr's in Canada? My allergist said that my son would have to wait til he is 5 to get any testing. He is only 2 right now.
Thanks.[/b]

Posted on: Tue, 07/17/2001 - 11:31pm
ImmunoCAPAllergyBloodTest's picture
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Joined: 07/16/2001 - 09:00

Dear Philip's mom,
first, here is the scientific answer:
Interpretation: the higher the response value, the more specific IgE is present in the sample. A high or low specific IgE level may not necessarily correlate to the degree of symptom severity, as each person's symptomatic threshold varies.
In different patients and on different occasions, the relationship between sensitization, inflammation, and hyperresponsiveness may be substantially different, leading to very heterogeneous patterns of clinical symptoms. Infections and treatment may also influence the sensitization process and the presence of symptoms. (Mediators in Allergy Diagnosis, Ahlstedt, S., 98063.RP).
A definitive clinical diagnosis should not be based on the results of any single diagnostic method, but should only be made by the physician after all clinical and laboratory findings have been evaluated.
At this time, our Web site [url="http://www.IsItAllergy.com,"]www.IsItAllergy.com,[/url] provides information for physicians to interpret results of testing for specific inhalants (allergens that are inhaled, such as pollens, or dust mites). This site is being revamped and launched late August 2001. Soon we will begin to add information for other childhood conditions and allergy-like symptoms. Feedback is certainly welcome.
Another site with good information is our corporate Diagnostics site at [url="http://www.pharmaciadiagnostics.com/allergySite.asp?URL=AllergyQuestions"]http://www.pharmaciadiagnostics.com/allergySite.asp?URL=AllergyQuestions[/url]
Lorraine
Quote:Originally posted by Philip's Mom:
[b]Hi Lorraine and thank you for this information. I've searched your site but I didn't find conclusive information concerning interpretation of results. Many people on this site question whether a higher result means a higher, or more severe reaction (in particular to peanut allergy). For example my son recently had the CAP-RAST test looking for just legume allergies. His results were 93.5 for peanut and 37.5 for peas. My allergist told me my son would "probably" not be airborne sensitive as that is typically Class VI but that he would definitely be contact sensitive. I am happy with my allergist and thought he did a great job of discussing Philip's allergies.
Do you have any reference material you could point us to that would provide us this conclusive type information? It seems many other allergists issue numbers without explaining what they mean. Is there such a thing as a definitive chart that correlates CAP-RAST scores with potential reactions?
Again thank you for coming on this site and provide concrete information concerning a commonly misunderstood topic.[/b]

Posted on: Wed, 08/29/2001 - 1:10pm
BCUZILUVHIM's picture
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Joined: 03/17/2001 - 09:00

Just bringing this to the top for Amy2 and SF! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Fran
[This message has been edited by BCUZILUVHIM (edited August 29, 2001).]

Posted on: Wed, 03/06/2002 - 2:42pm
rebekahc's picture
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Joined: 12/02/1999 - 09:00

Just re-raising this.

Peanut Free Store

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