64 posts / 0 new
Last post
Posted on: Wed, 10/18/2006 - 6:39am
joeybeth's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/01/2006 - 09:00

kara and kathy: not sure if this is related in any way or not but i have a neighbor who claims her son is allergic to peanuts. although he has no anaphylactic symptoms or visible symptoms such as hives, swelling, redness, etc.; they claim it causes immediate and extreme behavior problems for him. when he was younger they say they had to restrain him around other children, for example, if he had ingested peanuts/peanut butter. i never really took thier comments into consideration because what they were describing in no way relates to what my two PA daughter's deal with when exposed to peanut products. in fact, i was kind of annoyed at her description of their "peanut allergy" because it made no sense to me and even made me worry that others in our community might not take the potential for anaphylaxis serious if they heard what this family had to say about peanut allergy. maybe there is something to that though....or maybe there is something else in peanut butter, other than peanut protein, that causes these behavior issues. at any rate, our symptoms have never been behavioral in nature but i guess what you two are saying and what this family has said might be something to consider. hope this helps....
joey

Posted on: Wed, 10/18/2006 - 7:09am
KaraLH's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/11/2006 - 09:00

Joey,
I can understand your concern with your neighbor. I'm sure it is frustrating to hear of people with such a different reaction. I would have never believed it except to see the test results myself. Just to re-itterate (is that how you spell that?), our allergist did say symptoms and reactions could change/worsen the more she is exposed. Believe me, my husband and I take this very seriously considering the stories and experiences we have heard about. This is my fear, that because my daughters reaction has not been anaphalactic in nature yet or may never be, that we won't be taken seriously either. My daughter also has a severe allergy to eggs and problems with somekind of preservative or additive.
Also just to let you know, my daughter was having "fits" not just problems playing with her sister or with other children, but times that she laid on the floor and screamed as she arched her back so violently, and her eyes rolled back in her head. This sometimes went on for an hour or more. We thought she might be having seizures. Thus the reason for her CT scan and other tests. So even though she has never had problems with breathing or things like that, we have been scared to death also.
I'm sorry if I repeated myself from my previous post! And I hope I didn't come across as rude. Just want you to have a better understanding.
Thanks for your response.
Kara

Posted on: Wed, 10/18/2006 - 10:47am
KathyM's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/16/2006 - 09:00

HI Kara and everyone else,
Thanks for all of the info. and personal experiences. My son actually has a few issues going on. He has been receiving speech therapy due to a speech disorder called apraxia and occupational therapy because he has sensory issues. Also, in July we found out he has ADHD. All three of these sometimes can occur together. So I guess that is where the behavior problems were coming from - his inability to communicate so he would get upset because we couldn't figure out what he was saying. He is doing much better now, but still will need speech and OT. We have decided not to medicate for the ADHD. He only just turned 5 and is in half-day kindergarten. I've been reading about the Feingold "diet" which eliminates artficial colors, flavors,and preservatives, as well as certain fruits and vegetables. Many people who follow this truly believe it helps their children with ADHD and other disorders.
Sorry this is so long, but that is our background. Since eliminating peanut products, maybe there has been a slight improvement in behavior, but that could be also because he is getting OT and is maturing. We still need to do more to help him behave and feel better.

Posted on: Wed, 10/18/2006 - 12:50pm
joeybeth's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/01/2006 - 09:00

kara:
i understood what you were saying. i think i just wasn't effective in conveying what i meant to say. my neighbor believes her son's behavior after eating peanuts/peanut butter is caused by some sort of reaction or physical something going on that often causes him to lash out if other kids happen to be around when it happens. if i remember correctly, he does have episodes like what you were describing also...not just behavior with other children. i wasn't clear about that. i just always wondered if it wasn't an additive in the pb or something, rather than peanuts...in light of the fact that the child has no anaphylactic symptoms at all (and no milder symptoms like hives or anything like that either).
joey

Posted on: Wed, 10/18/2006 - 9:17pm
KaraLH's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/11/2006 - 09:00

Thanks Joey. I think I understand too. The only thing that my allergist could tell us about the preservatives and additives is that those are sensitivities, not true allergies. And my daughter did test positive for a peanut allergy. There is no testing (currently) available for preservative and additive sensitivies. He told us in order to figure those out for my daughter, it would be a lot of "detective" work. Admittedly, my daughter did not wield a 10mm flare on her skin test for peanut(that was more her egg!) but she was diagnosed as a class 3. I don't know if that helps? Anyway, thanks for your response.
Kara

Posted on: Thu, 10/26/2006 - 10:11am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

KathyM:
Welcome!
If you get a minute, please go to the Off Topic section of the boards and look for the NonVerbal Learning Disability (NVLD) thread. It's long, but the first couple pages should be enough for you to decide if your child fits into a similar situation. Many of us here have kids with sensory issues, speech problems, and the like. I hope you'll check it out. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 11/02/2006 - 11:56pm
saknjmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

I have a friend whose child does not have food allergies, but sensory problems and was given diagnosis of ADD last year.
He is a great kid, my friend has done a lot to help him. It will be okay. She said once she understood the sensory issues, she was better able to help him and understanding the problems made it easier for her to deal with his behavior and other things that come with sensory issues.
As far as the tree nuts, you should avoid for a couple of reasons in my opinion. Many times nuts and peanuts are processed on shared equipment---this means a xcontamination problem. Also, many people with food allergies also run the risk of reacting to tree nuts.
Take care...Welcome

Posted on: Fri, 10/20/2006 - 2:53pm
Momcat's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

Hello Walshie!
Welcome to our site. Wow, your son has quite a list of allergens there. Has he reacted to all those things and have positive tests for them?
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Fri, 10/20/2006 - 10:39pm
Walshie's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/18/2006 - 09:00

Hello. Yes peanuts, soy, eggs, sesame seeds, sunflower, and wheat are really really bad. He is a 3+ on most and 4+ on the rest. I do not have any tests under 3+.
Alice

Posted on: Sat, 10/21/2006 - 12:51am
McCobbre's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/16/2005 - 09:00

Welcome! Have you checked out the Cherrybrook Kitchen baking items? I don't know that it's safe for all on your child's list. We've got PA/Sesame/Shellfish in our family. They make some gluten free things now, and you can find them on their website. I typically only see the frosting as gluten free in the store--and in my stores the Cherrybrook Kitchen stuff is all in the gluten free section (so that's a concern in itself).
You'll see some info about other allergens pop up here. There's also a site I go to for shellfish and sesame stuff--allergicliving.

Pages

Peanut Free and Nut Free Community

Click on one of the categories below to see all topics and discussions.

Latest Discussions

Latest Post by krisztina Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:49pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by chicken Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:45pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by lexy Tue, 01/28/2020 - 12:21am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Sun, 01/26/2020 - 11:15am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Sun, 01/26/2020 - 11:11am
Comments: 5
Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 11:03am
Comments: 10
Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 10:52am
Comments: 2
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 01/14/2020 - 1:03pm
Comments: 1

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

Just being around food can provoke anxiety in those living with food allergies, but this fear may be reduced or alleviated by a type of food...

You might have wondered how your family’s adjustment to living with a potentially life-threatening food allergy compares to other families in the...

When a child is diagnosed with peanut allergy, the implications ripple past the parents to rattle the rest of us - older siblings, grandparents,...

It can be easy to overlook the presence of nut allergens in non-food items because the allergens are often listed by their Latin or scientific...

There is no definitive treatment for a peanut allergy. Because every case different, reactions will...

If you or your child has a peanut allergy, that unmistakable smell of peanuts wafting through the air...

As much as 90 percent of all allergic responses to food are caused by only eight foods. The most common food allergens are milk, eggs, peanuts,...

Peanut oil is an inexpensive, healthful and inoffensive way to cook—unless you have a peanut allergy!

Light peanut oil is popular as a...

Although allergies affect many people worldwide, there are currently no universal allergy symbols. It is estimated that about 25 percent of...

This question has an interesting answer that may surprise you.

It is true that a chestnut is a nut. On the other hand, there are other...

Sometimes a runny nose or other allergy symptoms appear during pregnancy. Have you ever known someone who developed...

Peanuts cause more severe food allergic reactions than other foods, followed by shellfish, fish, tree nuts and eggs. Although there is only a...

Dogs have some things in common with humans when it comes to their health. They can have a wide range of allergies, just as humans can develop....

Which candy bars are safe for those with peanut allergies? Those without allergies are accustomed to...

For many people with peanut allergies, baked goods present one of the most significant risks. Even if...

If children begin to eat many different foods at a young age, there is much more of a chance that by the time they are in school, they will eat...

Those with peanut allergies often find that they are unable to enjoy dessert since there's always the...

For those with peanut allergies, baked goods present a serious risk. Many baked goods do not appear to contain peanuts, yet were baked in a...

If you've ever tried to find...

If you find frequent allergy-related food recalls upsetting you are not alone, but a new federal rule may help reduce the cross-contamination...