IgG testing?

Posted on: Wed, 06/20/2007 - 10:22am
Sarahb's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

I am thinking of having a blood test done on my son that will test IgG and IgE - some 95 foods? This would be done through a naturopath's office. Why haven't my ped or allergist suggested such a test? I am a little annoyed that I feel like I have two kids...one that I bring to the ped. and one to the allergist - it's like they find it impossible to work coherently. Arg...I'm in a big rush right now but wondered if others had this test by US BioTec and is it of any value? confused?

Posted on: Wed, 06/20/2007 - 11:02am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

When I asked about having all the other foods tested my allergist suggested NOT having it done. Unless your son child is having a problem I wouldn't have it done. Some things can be false positives and then you would be avoiding a food that your child really isn't allergic to (that is the way it was explained to me). I hope I explained that right. BUT you have to do what feels right for your family.

Posted on: Wed, 06/20/2007 - 11:51am
Daisy's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

Hi,
I work in a lab, but not in Immunology. But as I understand IgE it identifies *current* allergic response predictability to specific proteins.
IgG response has a very long life and, as such, can show up in the blood, yet have no clinical significance in determining a *current* allergic state. An Immunologist (PhD) friend of mine explained that basically you can have an IgG reponse to many things, but it may mean absolutely nothing about your current immunologic state...just old data your body stores away.
I would imagine that when you "outgrow" an allergy, your body would still display IgG to that specific protein, but your IgE would go away.
IgG is often used to as a diagnostic tool to see if immune stimulation has ever existed (as a memory response) to diseases. An example of this would be to test to see if a PG woman has been previously vaccinated to measles, and had a positive response to the vaccine.
IgG interpretation is tricky. I mean, you can test for many things, but it's all in how you interpret them. That's why we are not allowed to order our own diagnostic testing. It takes years of knowledge to know how to interpret them, inconjunction with other tests *and* clinical symptoms.
Immunologist's spend their whole specialty training for this. I would be very concerned about this test being misinterpreted by a non-medical type.
My 2 cents... I have been given enough faulty info from *real* MD's, such as Internal Med & Gastro's.
And I have sought out non-MD sources, too. But they suggested too many things that just didn't make sense, or could have harmed me. I like for a Doc, MD or otherwise, to have MORE medical knowledge than *I* do.
See below for a better explanation:
Quote:
Antibodies are part of the body's immune system. They are immunoglobulin proteins that help protect us against microscopic invaders such as viruses, bacteria, chemicals, or toxins.
There are five different classes of immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG, IgE, IgA, and IgD). The three most frequently measured are IgM antibodies, which are produced early in an infection; IgG antibodies, which are created later and can remain in the bloodstream for decades; and IgE antibodies, which are primarily associated with allergies.
[url="http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/antibody_tests/glance.html"]http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/antibody_tests/glance.html[/url]
HTH,
Daisy

Posted on: Wed, 06/20/2007 - 11:51am
Sarahb's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

My allergist said the same thing about what I thought was the RAST test...and at the time I think she was right. Except that something is still going on - he is itchy all the time and we don't know what it is. So I know that he is reacting to something and I think I can handle it better now and not over react to the test but use it as info. I am more interested in the IgG part at this point. I don't think that we have any more LTFA's going on now...but something is going on.

Posted on: Wed, 06/20/2007 - 11:54am
Sarahb's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

Daisy - THANK YOU. I posted before I saw your response..... I have some reading/thinking to do. Thank you so much

Posted on: Wed, 06/20/2007 - 12:47pm
Daisy's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

Hi Sarah,
That site provides very down to earth info about many lab tests...why ordered...what it means...what it entails. Good reference site.
And yes, I once asked my Doc about generalized testing, as my GI allergies were pretty out-of-control. He replied, "Let's don't give you any allergies you don't already have."
He suggested an elimiation diet & a food diary. I was able to pinpoint several things that way and avoid them.
Someone has an elimination diet posted here in the last couple of days. See the post on Hypoallergenic Diet.
BTW, I'm not totally against Naturopaths. It's just that the one that I saw was actually a Chiropractor, and from talking with him I got a clue that he knew very little about allergies, or medicine in general.
Take care,
Daisy
[This message has been edited by Daisy (edited June 20, 2007).]

Posted on: Wed, 06/20/2007 - 1:19pm
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

It must feel like looking for a needle in a haystack as you try to determine what's making your dc so itchy. How long has it been going on? Any chance it's related to the heat, or some indirect issue like sunscreen, more frequent bathing, etc.?
Of course, it might be a food issue. When I was trying to see if a hidden food allergy was affecting my child's behavior to look like ADHD (we know these problematic behaviors got worse in pollen season), I also wanted to test him for everything under the sun. The allergist agreed to do a RAST test for foods that we couldn't easily eliminate from his diet without severely harming his nutrition (various beans, soy, vegetables, fruit, etc. He's vegetarian). Based on the RAST test, he did an elimination diet for several weeks of each food that came back + of the RAST. Then, we'd add one of them back into the diet and see for the next few weeks if there was any change in behavior. There never was, so then we'd add the next food back to the diet. You get the idea. We then eliminated various other things from his diet, adding them back one at a time and waiting awhile in between (I think it was 3 weeks, but I forget now). Maybe a similar approach would work for you. Use the blood tests as guidance on what to eliminate first. If the itchiness goes away, then you slowly add back one at a time until you figure out the culprit(s). Remember that it takes 2-3 weeks to clear the remnants out of the system, so start your assessment whether there's improvement at 3 weeks after the elimination begins, and ask the dr. how long to continue without any of the possible culprits in order to assess whether the itchiness goes away.
Good luck!

Posted on: Wed, 06/20/2007 - 2:05pm
Sarahb's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

Well ds was sick for about 7 days and had fever 6 days - during that time he ate very little and didn't itch at ALL. Even when he was running around playing and you never would have known he was sick. NO itching. It was pretty dramatic and has me convinced that something he is eating is making him itch. I am also going to have him tested for Celiac as it runs in my family. I am afriad that if we do an elimination diet it will tell us that wheat makes him itchy and I think he is willing to live with that but I want to make sure that it is not also damaging his intestines as it would for Celiac. I just have a nagging feeling that there is something there and we can find it if we look and the ped and allergist don't really seem to care. So we will see. I am taking him tomorrow morning for an evaluation. Hopefully we can do the allergy testing and celiac too and then see where we are.

Posted on: Thu, 06/21/2007 - 5:25am
Sarahb's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

He pooped on queue! LOL
We saw the doc today. She did a few IgG tests - didn't see reason to test for Celiac - gave me some probiotics and fish oil supplements to help his skin/gut heal. Thinks recurrent ear infections/antibotics damaged his gut and we can heal it by figgering the eczema trigger - removing it from the diet for a few months and then reintroducing. I'll post our results. Oh...and while she was asking about his poop - he said "I gotta poop" - so she got to see one first hand. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[This message has been edited by Sarahb (edited June 21, 2007).]

Posted on: Thu, 07/12/2007 - 6:26am
Sarahb's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

Well we got the test results and they are not good. The bottom line is that she wants us to aviod all dairy, garlic, wheat, barley, soy,oats, rye, blueberries and eggs for two months. We are already avoiding eggs....wheat won't be a big deal...but dairy has me bummed! He tested highly reactive for every category in the dairy column.
She gave me a calcium/mag supplement and something called Glutamine for "gut repair".
In two months we go back...see how he is doing and either re-test or start reintroducing foods.
She thinks he will respond well and that this is just temporary.
I asked her if my pediatrician would laugh at me if I brought these test results to her and she said that she might. *roll eyes*
But...when I think about it...the allergist and ped said....food triggers eczema - wheat, dair and egg are some of the main culprits.....so this testing and the reccomendation does NOT seem far off from what they would have said.
I have read the threads here about other people's children scratching until bloody and crying themselves to sleep with terrible eczema....I can't imagine how hard that would be....my son is not like that...but he is itchy and has those dang shiners under his eyes all the time.
She also refered me to an ENT to get the "green thing" out of his ear! LOL. I think it is a tube that maybe got dislodged and is covered in gunk (medical term) but they aren't so sure. We'll see Monday at 10!
I welcome all opinions...but I'm pretty sure we are going to try this.
I would also love any suggestions for dairy substitutes that are not soy based and kid friendly alternate sources of calcium. She did give me some good hand outs with this kind of information but personal experience is always so helpful.
Sorry for the long post and thanks for all the help that I have already gotten from this board and the wonderful people here! I wish I never met ya!

Posted on: Thu, 07/12/2007 - 7:58am
stella's picture
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Joined: 07/06/2007 - 09:00

Sarah, in your first post, you said that the blood test would test for 95 foods - both IGE and IGG. I have a question about the foods that came back positive and you are now avoiding. Were they positive for IGE or IGG? Did the IGE testing the naturopath match the IGE on the RAST?
Thanks.

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