If you\'ve used your epipen ever????

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 6:46am
brown1442's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/20/2006 - 09:00

I am just curious what its like to use it... Does it stop the reaction immediately?? What happens right after you give it??? Does the reaction come back after it wears off??

We just got our epipen jr's for my 13 month old son and they scare me quite a bit!! I am just curious what to expect if you use it.... hoping that I never will have to!!

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 6:55am
ajgauthier's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/13/2005 - 09:00

I've used mine twice, but I was very young (on the order of 7 years old). From what I remember, it was pretty much instant relief. Either it was psychologically instant (as in PHEW! I can stop panicking now) or it was physiologically instant...I was too young to tell the difference!
Either way - it's about using the epi quickly, having a second one on hand if needed...and getting to the ER quickly (even after epi injection).
It's hard to do a focused search for epipen in these boards, but if you go under each folder heading and scroll back a couple pages, I think somewhat recently someone else had brought up "what does it feel like?" or something like that...there were a lot of informative posts in there.
Adrienne
------------------
30-something survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 7:52am
Carefulmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

I used it on dd when she was 2 1/2 the first time she ate egg. It did work immediately and after 3 to 4 hours she got a rash. By then she had already seen the allergist and gotten antihistamine and steriods. It works very fast (less than 60 seconds). Don`t hesitate to use it. If you wait to use it, it may not work, because once the blood pressure has started to drop then the medicine would sit in the leg instead of going to the heart, lungs, throat, etc. When you hear stories about it not working, that is usually why---because the person waited too long.

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 8:18am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

We have had to use it once on my 6 year old pa, tna son. He had a major reaction to a walnut about a year ago. My gut new he needed it, he was begging me to get the epi, but my husband had to inject him because my hands were shaking so badly. After the injection went in, he started reversing almost immediately! By the time we arrived at the ER (7 minutes after) he was doing much better, although very hyper! My advice, don't be afraid to use it.

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 8:27am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

Good question. Always.
We've used it.
HINT: Practice on an unsuspecting orange, with expired pens.. (and I hope you have PLENTY of expired ones -- Means you've NOT used them) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
It clears things up REAL REAL quick (you hope).
Enough to get to the ER.
Follow the directions, and count to 10.
Hugs to those of us that HAVE used them, and hugs to those that haven't!
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 8:48am
McCobbre's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/16/2005 - 09:00

Check out this recent thread on what using an epipen feels like:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/007783.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/007783.html[/url]

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 12:16pm
JenniferKSwan's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/19/2006 - 09:00

We had to make a trip to the ER for an allergy reaction when my son was 8mos old. Appparently he is allergic to barley among everything else. What started out as hives covering his entire body and hysterical crying turned scary when we got into the car and he became oddly calm (I was home alone and opted to drive him to the ER because I thought it was serious, but not life threatening). When I relayed my story to the ER doc, she asked if I had an epi-pen. I told her that I did and she told me I should have used it. She said at most, I would have been overly cautious (and no harm would come to my son) and reminded me that small infants / children can not tell you if they are having trouble breathing.
We have a "Plan of Attack" posted on the refrigerator that I have reviewed with my husband and my mother in law (she lives with us). Essentially we have Aiden's allergies listed, his possible allergies listed and foods we avoid (like TN and peas). Below that I have listed what to do in case of one of Aiden's minor reactions (welts), hives (and what to do if they don't subside) and anaphlyactic shock. Each step mentions where to find his medicine in the diaper bag and where his diaper bag is located. At the bottom of the page I have the driving directions to the nearest ER (mainly for a hives reaction, never if breathing trouble exists). It also clearly states that if Aiden is ever suspected of having ingested nuts or having difficulty breathing that we should follow instructions for anaphylactic shock. I would like to think that we are all pretty clear on what to do if something was to happen, but having it in your face every day should help to reinforce it and hopefully allow us to be calm if such a situation should arise (okay, I have high hopes there). Plus I feel better knowing that since I will be away from Aiden for a few days in the next month or so (having DS#2) that if anyone else is watching him (ie my parents or his aunt) that they have instructions to follow.
Since thankfully we have never had to use the pens, I have retraining drills (with the dummy pen) in the house every few months. Overkill? Possibly. But again, I figure the more we practice, the less likely we are to panic in case we do need it.
------------------
Mommy to Aiden 1/26/05 PA,wheat,barley,soy,egg and others yet to be discovered DS#2 is due July 15, 2006 who we hope will be AF

Posted on: Mon, 06/26/2006 - 1:25am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

I've never used the epi-pen, but I was given epinephrine in the hospital.
It was like resurfacing in a murky pond. Suddenly, I could take breaths, and colour came back into my world. It did work immediately, but temporarily. (Always go to the hospital if epi is needed -- it is safer then just giving yourself more epi, you might need other treatment as well.)

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 6:55am
ajgauthier's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/13/2005 - 09:00

I've used mine twice, but I was very young (on the order of 7 years old). From what I remember, it was pretty much instant relief. Either it was psychologically instant (as in PHEW! I can stop panicking now) or it was physiologically instant...I was too young to tell the difference!
Either way - it's about using the epi quickly, having a second one on hand if needed...and getting to the ER quickly (even after epi injection).
It's hard to do a focused search for epipen in these boards, but if you go under each folder heading and scroll back a couple pages, I think somewhat recently someone else had brought up "what does it feel like?" or something like that...there were a lot of informative posts in there.
Adrienne
------------------
30-something survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 7:52am
Carefulmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

I used it on dd when she was 2 1/2 the first time she ate egg. It did work immediately and after 3 to 4 hours she got a rash. By then she had already seen the allergist and gotten antihistamine and steriods. It works very fast (less than 60 seconds). Don`t hesitate to use it. If you wait to use it, it may not work, because once the blood pressure has started to drop then the medicine would sit in the leg instead of going to the heart, lungs, throat, etc. When you hear stories about it not working, that is usually why---because the person waited too long.

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 8:18am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

We have had to use it once on my 6 year old pa, tna son. He had a major reaction to a walnut about a year ago. My gut new he needed it, he was begging me to get the epi, but my husband had to inject him because my hands were shaking so badly. After the injection went in, he started reversing almost immediately! By the time we arrived at the ER (7 minutes after) he was doing much better, although very hyper! My advice, don't be afraid to use it.

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 8:27am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

Good question. Always.
We've used it.
HINT: Practice on an unsuspecting orange, with expired pens.. (and I hope you have PLENTY of expired ones -- Means you've NOT used them) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
It clears things up REAL REAL quick (you hope).
Enough to get to the ER.
Follow the directions, and count to 10.
Hugs to those of us that HAVE used them, and hugs to those that haven't!
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 8:48am
McCobbre's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/16/2005 - 09:00

Check out this recent thread on what using an epipen feels like:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/007783.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/007783.html[/url]

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2006 - 12:16pm
JenniferKSwan's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/19/2006 - 09:00

We had to make a trip to the ER for an allergy reaction when my son was 8mos old. Appparently he is allergic to barley among everything else. What started out as hives covering his entire body and hysterical crying turned scary when we got into the car and he became oddly calm (I was home alone and opted to drive him to the ER because I thought it was serious, but not life threatening). When I relayed my story to the ER doc, she asked if I had an epi-pen. I told her that I did and she told me I should have used it. She said at most, I would have been overly cautious (and no harm would come to my son) and reminded me that small infants / children can not tell you if they are having trouble breathing.
We have a "Plan of Attack" posted on the refrigerator that I have reviewed with my husband and my mother in law (she lives with us). Essentially we have Aiden's allergies listed, his possible allergies listed and foods we avoid (like TN and peas). Below that I have listed what to do in case of one of Aiden's minor reactions (welts), hives (and what to do if they don't subside) and anaphlyactic shock. Each step mentions where to find his medicine in the diaper bag and where his diaper bag is located. At the bottom of the page I have the driving directions to the nearest ER (mainly for a hives reaction, never if breathing trouble exists). It also clearly states that if Aiden is ever suspected of having ingested nuts or having difficulty breathing that we should follow instructions for anaphylactic shock. I would like to think that we are all pretty clear on what to do if something was to happen, but having it in your face every day should help to reinforce it and hopefully allow us to be calm if such a situation should arise (okay, I have high hopes there). Plus I feel better knowing that since I will be away from Aiden for a few days in the next month or so (having DS#2) that if anyone else is watching him (ie my parents or his aunt) that they have instructions to follow.
Since thankfully we have never had to use the pens, I have retraining drills (with the dummy pen) in the house every few months. Overkill? Possibly. But again, I figure the more we practice, the less likely we are to panic in case we do need it.
------------------
Mommy to Aiden 1/26/05 PA,wheat,barley,soy,egg and others yet to be discovered DS#2 is due July 15, 2006 who we hope will be AF

Posted on: Mon, 06/26/2006 - 1:25am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

I've never used the epi-pen, but I was given epinephrine in the hospital.
It was like resurfacing in a murky pond. Suddenly, I could take breaths, and colour came back into my world. It did work immediately, but temporarily. (Always go to the hospital if epi is needed -- it is safer then just giving yourself more epi, you might need other treatment as well.)

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