If you support \"Peanut Bans\",

Posted on: Wed, 12/31/2003 - 7:31pm
MommaBear's picture
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Would you support/comply other "bans" in schools related to different food allergies? Even if you didn't understand or agree with the rationale behind them? Would you have to *personally* [i]consider[/i] it lifethreatening? Would you comply even if you thought it only improved quality of life?

and..........What constitutes a moral/ethical concern or duty? Where an adult is concerned, where a child is concerned? Is there a difference?

Posted on: Thu, 01/01/2004 - 5:33am
Going Nuts's picture
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What the heck were you doing up at that hour, MB? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Tough and very thought provoking question. Much as we'd all like to think we'd comply with a ban for any allergen no matter what, the fact is that could quickly get out of hand. What about a ban on milk products for the child who becomes so anxious when he sees milk that he has an anxiety attack? Does that affect his quality of life? Sure, but how much do we impose on others? Do we institute a ban only if the reaction is life-threatening? Do we require documentation of a previous life-threatening reaction before determining whether to ban an allergen? Scientific docmentation of an allergen's ability to aerosolize, stick to surfaces, etc.? Hard one when there is so much conflicting information out there.
Whenever I think of milk allergies, I remember an example that an allergist once shared with me of a teenage patient of his. This boy was sitting at a lunch table, and one of his table mates flicked his straw. A drop (literally, one drop) of milk hit this boy in the eye and he spent several weeks in ICU. Thankfully, he recovered. Granted, this is a most unusual case, but could it happen again to someone else? Surely. How many people in the general population would be willing to ban all dairy products in the unlikely event of this happening? I bet not even all of us would.
Personally, I would gladly comply with a ban of any allergen (gulp, even wheat) if there was a high risk of morbidity or mortality to another child. Would the ban be classwide? School wide? I could foresee a school in which peanuts, fish, dairy, eggs and wheat were banned. Imagine trying to enforce that with 500+ students. Yikes!
Can you tell from the length of my posts I'm trying to avoid doing any more vacuuming? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
Amy

Posted on: Thu, 01/01/2004 - 5:37am
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Anonymous (not verified)

I would definitely support/comply other "bans" as much as I do peanut bans. I support bans in pre-school, and primary grades, but feel as children grow older it is less necessary. As an adult I have to live in a world with peanuts and peanut butter. This is the world all of these children eventually have to be ready for.
Would I have to *personally* [i]consider[/i] it life threatening? I've learned that any allergy can be life threatening, and I can't very well ask for proof can I? (Proof = death) Would you comply even if you thought it only improved quality of life? YES It would not require a *ban* for me to comply. A simple request would do it.

Posted on: Thu, 01/01/2004 - 9:37am
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Because I believe in treating others as I wish to be treated, I would support other bans. (Besides they'd all benefit my DS who is allergic to everything). I would not personally have to be convinced that the allergy at issue was life threatening. I would hate to have to intentionally expose my child to one of his allergens and rush him to the ER just to prove it's serious in order to get a ban and I wouldn't expect anyone else to go through that either. There's always the chance for a reaction to be anaphylactic where it hasn't before, I certainly wouldn't want to wait until that happened to take precautions to prevent it.
In all honesty, this issue of 'proof of severity' is one of the reasons we've chosen to home school. I anticipate (perhaps cynically, perhaps not) that I would have to 'prove' that my child's allergies were life-threatening in order to get the accomodations that I consider essential to his well-being. Since he's not had a severe reaction yet, I would not be able to provide the requisite proof.
With PA, I might be able to use statistical evidence, but with all the other foods it would just be my word/belief as to the danger. (For instance, we are pretty sure that airborne wheat flour triggers a respiratory reaction - can't prove it though. I'm certainly not going to expose him to the stuff again just to see what happens.) Rather than put him at risk if/until a severe reaction occurs we've opted to keep him in safe environment where mommy instincts carry enough weight to justify the sought after accomodations. :-)
I should add that just because I would as a matter of personal morality support a ban of any allergen, I don't think that all bans would meet the necessary legal standard to become a required accomodation. Knowing how hard and costly it is to cook without all of DS' allergens, I can't imagine that forcing an entire school system to do so would be viewed as a 'reasonable accomodation.'
[This message has been edited by momjd (edited January 01, 2004).]

Posted on: Fri, 01/02/2004 - 2:36am
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There's a lady who works at the health department who has anaphylactic reactions to perfume and things of any nature that omit an odor. Instead of working from home (an option they gave her) , she insists on working at the offices making life miserable for the rest of us who need to go in there. I walked in one day with NO perfume , NO hair spray , NO strong laundry cleaning smells and she picked up on the odor of my face cream (non-allergenic face cream btw)that I'd applied HOURS before hand and I was asked to leave the office and return after I'd washed. I can't help but think that' putting other people out. Being hyper-sensitive is different than being allergic imnsvho.
Now then , having said that , my daughter is TA and simply touching the doorknob on the restroom that has essence of soap on it (soap that contains almond oil)gives her irritating topical problems. I suppose in that case , when she takes a [url="http://search.targetwords.com/u.search?x=5977|1||||job|AA1VDw"]job[/url] , she can request that the soap in the restrooms is nut free.
I would help support a ban if it were reasonable. If it were clear the mother was simply being picky and the child were sensitive I would not support it. In the case of ta/pa and other food allergies ,we are talking about life threatening issues.
Forgot to add.....the difference between food intolerances and food allergies would have to be defined clearly to all parties involved.
[This message has been edited by Jennifer1970 (edited January 02, 2004).]

Posted on: Fri, 01/02/2004 - 12:15pm
momjd's picture
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So does that mean that someone who could die from the scent of a facial cream should just stay home, but if it were peanuts that were the problem she'd be entitled to work from the office? Or is she not anaphylactic to the scent after all?
I'm not sure I'm clear on the facts stated above. Sorry.

Posted on: Fri, 01/02/2004 - 12:30pm
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Joined: 03/14/2003 - 09:00

Im sorry, but if you have anaphylactic reactions to strong odors and perfumes, I dont know how you could leave the house. I am very allergic to perfume and get lightheaded and dizzy instantly when I smell them. But its EVERYWHERE! On almost all people, magazines, etc. You can control your environment to an extent, like in her office, but what about the rest of the world, stores, just walking down the street, etc.
My son has a peanut free room in school and if anyone else had an allergy that required me to not send in certain food I would happily comply. However, I have to say I dont think its reasonable to say that no one in a dept. can wear anything scented. You are talking about everyone having to go buy a certain kind of soap, lotion, makeup, hair spray, deodorant, laundry soap, fabric softener, etc. Not only is that a major change needed by everyone at work, but at home as well. And it could be quite costly.
I hate that I have to ask people to accomodate my son the way we do, which I really dont think is a big deal. They can still send it in for lunch, just not for snacks on birthdays or parties. This just seems over the top. Im not saying she isnt truly ana., i have no way of knowing that, but I personally couldnt ask people to change that much to accomodate me.

Posted on: Sat, 01/03/2004 - 12:24am
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Are there peanut/nut oils/products in some topical preparations?
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 03, 2004).]

Posted on: Sat, 01/03/2004 - 1:29am
darthcleo's picture
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Joined: 11/08/2000 - 09:00

I'm sitting on the fence on this one (one of the reasons we homeschool, I don't have to take a decision ;-)
If milk were to be banned from a classroom, it would be a real pain to everyone. No cheese, no yogurt, no chocolate milk. If it's only banned from snacks and/or birthday cakes, it would be doable, but if it's banned from lunches too? That would be tough.
What about banning wheat? that's another hard one. Can you really ask a whole class-load of families to learn how to prepare lunches with no wheat, and no milk? I have a feeling that's asking for the impossible.
That said, a peanut ban is *not* that much to ask for. It's easy enough to survive without peanut butter. It's less demanding on parents.

Posted on: Sat, 01/03/2004 - 2:30am
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Quote:Originally posted by darthcleo:
[b]I'm sitting on the fence on this one (one of the reasons we homeschool, I don't have to take a decision ;-)
If milk were to be banned from a classroom, it would be a real pain to everyone. No cheese, no yogurt, no chocolate milk. If it's only banned from snacks and/or birthday cakes, it would be doable, but if it's banned from lunches too? That would be tough.
What about banning wheat? that's another hard one. Can you really ask a whole class-load of families to learn how to prepare lunches with no wheat, and no milk? I have a feeling that's asking for the impossible.
That said, a peanut ban is *not* that much to ask for. It's easy enough to survive without peanut butter. It's less demanding on parents.[/b]
I'm sitting here wondering if "doable" is in the eyes of the beholder with a vested interest. I mean, wouldn't a person with a life threatening wheat or milk allergy have to experience some degree of success in "banning" such items as to not have an exposure? Does the general public view "banning" peanuts in much the same way? ie: not "doable", not possible? Should "difficulty" in implementing "bans" be a consideration as to whether or not they are undertaken? Wait........... this is beginning to sound like determining "reasonable accommodations". [i]whoooooooooooooooooooaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.[/i]
Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form.

Posted on: Sat, 01/03/2004 - 2:32am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by darthcleo:
[b]That said, a peanut ban is *not* that much to ask for. It's easy enough to survive without peanut butter. It's less demanding on parents.[/b]
Again, should "less demanding" be a consideration?
Thinking: "spectrum" here and what direction does one take it in?
Anyone?

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