If you had a \"magic wand\", would you trade your child\'s PA for.......................

Posted on: Fri, 01/17/2003 - 9:41pm
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diabetes, seizure disorder, learning disability, hearing impairment, or blindness? Is there a health impairment or physical disability you would trade it for? Do you think your child would agree with you?

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 18, 2003).]

Posted on: Fri, 01/17/2003 - 9:48pm
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This is a tough one Mommabear, and it's kinda weird to try and answer it. LD is probably my first choice. There are lots of resources in the community, (if you live in a big urban area), for the blind and hard of hearing. In the right location you can live a quality life. Diabetes and seizures would likely be closer to what it's like to live with PA because it involves diet, unpredictable reactions, and possible death.
Well, I guess I have to choose LD because it's not threatening to the health and it's workable, (it's also a very sketchy diagnosis with encompasses a vast array of symptoms.)

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 4:07am
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My child is not PA, I have the allergies. But having a husband who is dyslexic, and I myself working disabled children...Hmmmm. It would be a difficult decision. Personally, from what I've seen my husband go through with dyslexia I'd never pick LD. You still have to go through a ton of educating people, and even then, a lot of people have treated DH like he's dumb-and he's the smartest person I know. It really has affected him psychologically. Also, there's very few services here for LD kids...and an interesting statistic is that many kids who are LD and who have no support eventually get into drugs, alcohol and crime. (DH is researching this, he's very passionate about LD and helping kids). If I could pick ANY condition...well-they ALL have difficulties, and while the grass may seem greener on the other side, no matter what you pick you'll still have to educate people, and still have your moments of heartbreak. They all have their limitations on your children. (although you were right, kids with LD, with the right support can do wonderfully well-dh has a Masters degree in Psych and is getting one right now in social work). For me personally, I'd keep my allergy. (of course it's easy for me to say though, I don't have a severe one)

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 4:37am
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Anonymous (not verified)

So, would I trade it for something that was not life threatening (although I believe diabetes can be?)? Wowser. That should keep my mind occupied while I lie here with my migraine for the next several hours. And would my guy agree with me? Hmm.
MommaBear, I have to say that you have been asking some really thought provoking, discussion provoking questions. I know that I ask a lot of questions [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] but I have to say that yours are much deeper than mine are and much more interesting to answer.
I'm going to have to think about it.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 7:06am
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Momma Bear, great question. Especially when I realized I'd stick with the PA.
Scary as it is, I think LD is worse. So many people think that LDs end at 3:00 when school lets out, but it simply isn't true. They affect self-esteem, relationships, employment, etc. Depending on the LD, there can be no end to the ramifications. I would definitely choose PA over diabetes, celiac, seizure disorders.
Gee, who ever would have thought PA was desirable? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Amy

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 7:43am
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[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 11:09am
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When we were at DS pulmonary appointment this week, we sat next to a 9 year old boy who just had his second open heart surgery because he was born with a heart valve that does not grow as his heart grows. And, I thought wow, we have a lot to be thankful for.
What would I trade food allergy for? Hmmm......not blindness, not deafness, not a LD, not diabetes, not a seizure disorder, ....good question. Wouldn't trade it for any of these.....how about a physical deformity ? nope.
i need to think about this one. probably nothing else or maybe would trade it for a problem that could be cured with a surgical procedure....

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 12:05pm
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No, I wouldn't trade my child's PA for any other serious ailment. When people say, "Wow, that must be really hard to have a child with severe allergies!", I always think how it could be soooo much worse. How sad for some children to have a really horrible disease, and that we really are lucky. Yes, it is scary, but it is manageable, and he will be OK. He is a terrific kid. Allergies are only one very small part of who he is, and I wouldn't change a thing. (although, if the supposed vaccine were to be approved, someday, I would sure be happy!)
Andrea

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 12:37pm
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andrea: i'm with you. IF we had to get something, thank God it was this. (did that sound bad?) i just think of everything else that people deal with and i at least know that my kids have something that we can protect them from and/or treat if something should happen. i'd rather them have no health concerns but we've got PA. my girls are so respectful of other peoples' special needs as a result which is a kind of nice effect too. i have never been an aggressive person and have let people walk all over me all my life (seriously). with PA i have learned to be aggressive when necessary and outspoken. i may not have ever learned to stand up for myself, but you can bet i'll do it for my kids. i figure one day i may even get around to being brave enough to stand up for myself! Joey

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 2:20pm
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I know this most amazing woman who lost an arm awhile ago...she does more with her 1 arm then I do with 2. She is absolutely incredible and I have a great deal of respect for her.
If *I* had to be disabled...I'd pick being deaf. But that is likely because I work with deaf children, and know sign language. My comfort zone is okay there.

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 11:55pm
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I definitely would not trade my dd's peanut and nut allergies for any of the "ailments" that you mentioned. I surely agree with Going Nuts about the learning disabilities. I wouldn't have asked for dd to have pa and tna if I had been given a choice; and there was a long time when I thought "why her??? Why are there so many other kids without allergies?????" Now I am far more accepting. Yes it is a burden, as we all know. But, now that Leah is 8, I am actually finding the stress a lot less. I think she is accepting of it; having grown up with it. There is always the possibility of an accidental reaction, and of course we must be prepared and careful at all times. But, I now accept it as just the way life is, and I think Leah does too. (Of course, it does help that Leah has been reaction free for over three years, knock on wood. She clearly must not be as sensitive as some other people are - which I know makes quite a difference in our lives.)
One of my best friends growing up is blind. He did incredibly well, considering. But - wow - when I look back on how tough it must have been for him it boggles my mind. There but for the grace of God.... Miriam

Posted on: Sun, 01/19/2003 - 12:53am
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I will keep the allergies, thankyou. I will even take a few on myself in trade for avoiding heart disease, seizures and diabetes!
It is manageable, if difficult at times, but all of the others are also. Diabetes, seizure disorders, and other diseases would most definately limit life expectancy, and I agree that the LD would actually be harder on a person emotionally and functionally. becca

Posted on: Sun, 01/19/2003 - 3:26am
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I am another one who thinks that, from that list, I would rather stick with PA. I might might might trade it for celiac. Maybe for an LD. Diabetes? Hmmm, I'd have to do more research on that!
My PA son was born with a birth defect. He has a cleft lip and cleft palate. It affects his appearance, requires many surgeries throughout his lifetime, and is a struggle all by itself. If I could choose between PA and the cleft, I would take the cleft. I think PA is worse because of the fear and uncertainty, and the limits it places on some activities.
But I think one reason we're all sticking with PA is because it's a "known quantity." We know how to deal with it. When you know something better, you fear it less. My friend's daughter has diabetes so I almost feel I could trade PA for diabetes, and LDs can be managed successfully, so I can almost see my way clear to taking an LD instead of PA. Blindness, deafness, CP...no way!! Those disabilities affect every aspect of a child's life and severely limit their opportunities. I wish my son didn't have PA, but it's not the worst thing possible, not by a long shot.

Posted on: Sun, 01/19/2003 - 9:32am
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I would never trade it for anything you mentioned. I HATE myself for admitting this, but if I am out and see a baby/child with a severe disability or learn of a child suffering from disease I internally thank God for giving me a child who "only has" food allergies.

Posted on: Mon, 01/20/2003 - 4:29am
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MommaBear, I've thought about this very carefully (thus the time it has taken me to answer) and I wouldn't trade Jesse's PA for anything else that you mentioned or comparable to what you mentioned. Now, if I could trade it for something as simple as him needing glasses or something, well, that would be a different story, but no, wouldn't trade it for anything else mentioned or comparable. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

Posted on: Wed, 01/22/2003 - 12:40am
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My 3rd grade dd (PA, TNA) is "dyslexic". Although we've suspected that for years and she's been receiving help at school by a reading specialist, the confirmation (actual testing and diagnosis) came just a few months ago. It's certainly been a struggle for her. Which one would I choose over the other? I'm still not sure...but probably PA.

Posted on: Sat, 02/01/2003 - 7:15am
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Extremely thought-provoking question. Hmmmm... I wouldn't trade PA for any of the other "conditions" you mentioned. Whether 5-year old Cayley would trade it remains to be seen, as she learns to deal with it on her own. I asked my adult PA/TNA friend, Kim, and she would stick with her allergy, too, thanks anyway.
On the other hand, I wouldn't imagine deaf people would be lining up to hear in exchange for a life-threatening food allergy. The devil you know, and all that...
Carolyn

Posted on: Sat, 02/01/2003 - 12:42pm
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Momma Bear,
My magic wand would find a cure for PA and all other diseases.
If I had to choose, I'd also rather my child have pa. I'd rather have to control his eating then control everthing else. Especially medically.
I know two children with CF (cystic fibrosis), the little girl that lives across the street from me has down syndrome.
I count my lucky blessings every day that my Drew only has "food allergies".
It is not always easy but it is easier than dealing with children with diseases. Another friend's son died at 7 years old from a brain tumor. That was two years ago already.
It is not always easy dealing with pa but it is much easier than watching your child suffer daily.
Renee

Posted on: Sat, 02/01/2003 - 2:58pm
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I worked with a little girl once with Cerebral Palsy, PA, egg allergy, who was tube fed, had life threatening seizures, and was in a wheelchair.
She is a beautiful child who I'm SURE her mother would trade everything else for the PA.
Don't feel bad AJS Mamma about saying that you thank God every day that your child only has food allergies. I come home from work every day and am thankful that my son is the way he is. Parents of special needs children are very special people-they have those kids 24 hours a day, seven days a week-I only get them for 5 hours at school and it's sooooo exhausting. I have the utmost admiration and respect for them.

Posted on: Tue, 02/25/2003 - 9:03pm
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Thought about this today. Would we trade our child's PA allergy for a behavior disorder? A severe behavior disorder? One that is triggered by common ingredients in our food supply: (ie dyes, lactose, sugar, etc?)

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 12:24am
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If PA is the worst we will ever be handed I will take it! I too find myself thanking God everyday that my child can run and play and sing and laugh and say "I wuv you mommy!", as there are so many other kids who can't! And so many parents who will never hear their child say 'i love you'. I had my tears about PA and my time of feeling sorry for my child and myself, but I am over that now! Not that I don't have my moments, but all I have to do is think how worse it could be and I snap myself right out of it!
I also sometimes think that maybe this was handed to us to make me a better person! I have so much more compassion for other people's situations now. Not that I was not compassionate before, but I think I am more now. I don't like to think so but I probably never would have realized the seriousness of food allergies before PA, and maybe I would have been one of these people that just "doesn't get it". Pa has taught me a real sense of being sympthathetic to other people's situations, and that I need to give more of myself to people and be more aware if I expect to get the same back. I guess what I am trying to say is, even though PA stinks, I think it has made me a better person in a sense! I like to think that if dd did not have PA and it was a friend of her's who did, that I would do my best to understand and keep her safe, but that is easy for me to say now, maybe I would have had a bit of a 'not my kid, not my problem' type attitude. I hope I would not, but you never definetly know how you will feel about a situation until it happens to you.
Don't get me wrong, there is not a day that goes by that I don't wish for a cure, but even if that happens or even if dd outgrows her PA, I will forever carry with me what I have learned. I will never forget the people I have had a chance to talk with and get to know, such as yourselves. You have all restored my faith that there are people out there who care about other people too, not just themselves. You are all a great group of people and have helped me so much and I will always remember that! Thank you!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
kcmom

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 12:30am
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Quote:Originally posted by kcmom:
[b]
I also sometimes think that maybe this was handed to us to make me a better person! I have so much more compassion for other people's situations now. Not that I was not compassionate before, but I think I am more now. I don't like to think so but I probably never would have realized the seriousness of food allergies before PA, and maybe I would have been one of these people that just "doesn't get it". Pa has taught me a real sense of being sympthathetic to other people's situations, and that I need to give more of myself to people and be more aware if I expect to get the same back. I guess what I am trying to say is, even though PA stinks, I think it has made me a better person in a sense! I like to think that if dd did not have PA and it was a friend of her's who did, that I would do my best to understand and keep her safe, but that is easy for me to say now, maybe I would have had a bit of a 'not my kid, not my problem' type attitude. I hope I would not, but you never definetly know how you will feel about a situation until it happens to you.
[/b]
WOW. WOW. WOW.
That was worth reposting. (Actually, the entire post was worth reposting). [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] Thank you!

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 12:35am
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[b]WOW WOW WOW WOW[/b]
kcmom,
I quadrupled that wow.
I think what you said is very true.
[This message has been edited by smack (edited February 26, 2003).]

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 12:42am
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Nope nope NOPE
Been there, done that. Don't know the specific ingredient, but something in red licorice made my son literally climb walls. We had a very bright two year old who injured himself in the most UNBELIEVABLE accident. Took him to the hospital for stitches and KNEW they would not believe how the accident happened. We also knew if we lied, he'd tell the truth and we'd really be in trouble. Well. We told the truth. So did he. Several times each. They sent us to an exam room to wait for the doctor. It was taking forever. When DH left to go to bathroom, there was a security guard standing outside our room. They had actually called CAS to investigate. Well, eventually, the doctor came, and saw our son literally climb the wall. He stitched him up and sent us home. Told nurse she was looking at a law suit by keeping us there (feared he would hurt himself more with all the doctor's toys around).
Back to LD question. Same son had LD. Actually, non-verbal learning disability. My initial answer to the first question was, yah, I'd pick LD over any food allergy. But then, we found good support for our son, and it's not an *unknown* for me. My LD son graduates from college this June. (He was planning to go back, but has since changed his mind and will settle for one degree.) And there are many different types of LD and many different degrees of it.
Karen - I think it is great that your hubby is now working towards helping others. Some of the best help we received for our son came from adults who had severe learning disabilities. It also gave me my best hope. I had a child who's IQ testing hit the top of the chart and yet he couldn't read or spell a simple word and 8. Although, he could read dinosaur names at 5.(His IQ isn't actually as high as the first test showed. The psych who did it just got over excited and probably made some mistakes.)
And those who think LD is easier to deal with than allergies, many teachers don't know any more about LD than they do about allergies, you still have to stay on top of them.

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 12:51am
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AnnaMarie,
loved your post. It's such a big world, isn't it? No one knows till they have been in your shoes. Again, loved your post.
Just for clarification, was the "nope Nope NOPE", in response to WOW WOW WOW, or my most recent question regarding PA and behavior disorder? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] (I know, I probably shoulda made a separate thread, but it fit in so well here) Again, thank you for sharing your experience. It is invaluable.

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 1:05am
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]Thought about this today. Would we trade our child's PA allergy for a behavior disorder? A severe behavior disorder? One that is triggered by common ingredients in our food supply: (ie dyes, lactose, sugar, etc?) [/b]
I know where you're coming from with this question...
No, I wouldn't trade. I've seen the skin "burn" off my mother's hands and feet from eating certain foods containing red dye. The skin literally peels off as if badly sunburned. (albeit not a behaviourial reaction - but scary nonetheless)
There are always worse things and better things... (and I understand now what you meant by "giving as good as you get" - hope the orifice is healing nicely... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 3:30am
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kinda tuff standing while typing. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 5:03am
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
Just for clarification, was the "nope Nope NOPE", in response to WOW WOW WOW, or my most recent question regarding PA and behavior disorder? [/b]
It was in response to:
Would we trade our child's PA allergy for a behavior disorder? A severe behavior disorder? One that is triggered by common ingredients in our food supply: (ie dyes, lactose, sugar, etc?)
Since I think while I'm typing, I'm slow. (Typing I mean, not thinking.) Didn't see the WOW WOW WOW til after.
I know where this is coming from too, and debated staying the he** out of it, but, I've learned so much from others experiences. Also, I'm still trying to get adopted. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] (Though now, I want to be adopted by your parents.)

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 9:11am
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[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 1:57pm
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I really agree with your posts Mommabear. Nobody really knows what it's like until it happens to them.
I've been blessed. My worst ailment has been my allergies, and failing math in high school. I have so far never lost anyone really close to me, broken any bones, or had to watch my child deal with anything other then some stitches. I've had it easy.
On the other hand, I've seen how LD has permenantly affected my DH, and how hard he works to get all those A's in university (yep-you saw that-straight A's-am I proud? Darn right I am!) I've lived and worked with kids with almost every ailment imagineable. Severe behavior disorders like the ones described, bi-polar disorder, mental illness, you name it. And from my own experience, I wouldn't trade PA for any of them. If more people had your perspective Momma bear, this world would be a whole lot less judgemental.

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 3:01pm
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KarenH,
I do believe you paid me what is probably one of the best comments I could ever receive in my life. Thank you. Speaking as a mother of two children with special needs myself(aside from PA), I hope you realize there isn't a compliment I could pay you that would adequately express how appreciated you are. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
MommaBear

Posted on: Wed, 02/26/2003 - 11:39pm
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I wouldn't change one thing about my DD. She is the most amazing little person on earth. I'll admit that PA is scary but there are many things that are worse.

Posted on: Thu, 02/27/2003 - 2:59pm
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Mommabear, I highly respect parents of special needs kids. I know exactly what you go through every day, and I get those kids for only 5 hours and send 'em back home!
That post that you reposted orignially by KC mom just blew me away. Wow. So right.

Posted on: Fri, 02/28/2003 - 12:41am
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I'm thankful for your posts on this topic, too, MamaBear. You have been courageous to bring them up, and I have not been so. My Mariah (PA) struggles so with her LD and I appreciate your perspective.
Thank you.

Posted on: Fri, 02/28/2003 - 4:42am
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My sister had encephalitis when she was 18 months old and had a brain injury as a result.
When she was 5 (back in 1959), she was put in the Glenwood State School for the mentally retarded. This is 25 years before there were community based services for brain injuries or the mentally retarded in Iowa.
We often visited her. She was in the hospital one time there and I can't describe to you all the horrific physical deformities that I saw with infant children lying in cribs. One was infant size but looked like a 40 year old.
Plus I remember mentally retarded children sitting in chairs and rocking all day or continually hitting their heads against the wall. They couldn't control their bowels, couldn't feed themselves, couldn't communicate...
When my oldest daughter was born, there was a baby in the nursery with "water on the brain" that was not expected to live. My daughter was beautiful and healthy.
I would never trade my PA allergy...never.

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 12:08pm
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what is wrong with you people? I am 23 years old and i am extremely allergic to peanuts. But there is no reason to ask would you want your kid to be retarded or whatever rather than being allergic to peanuts. Maybe some of you dont realize, but I, along with all of your children, are NORMAL. We may have to sacrifice certain things, but throwing out a kit kat is nowhere near losing your sight! Am I disabled? Just because I cant eat a peanut???? hell no. I can eat lots of other things. All I have to do is ask before I eat, and thats all you have to do too. I must ask mommabear to not post anything like this again. While peanut allergies are something to be reckoned with, we are all dealt a hand in life and must play our cards to the best of our abilities. We cannot let this rule every waking moment. If you dont trust the source, dont eat it. You or your children wont starve because of a nestles crunch, gummi bears, or a taco.

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 12:20pm
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Quote:Originally posted by gwarboy:
[b]what is wrong with you people? I am 23 years old and i am extremely allergic to peanuts. But there is no reason to ask would you want your kid to be retarded or whatever rather than being allergic to peanuts. [/b]
This is just a hypothetical question. The point of the question is for us to realize that [i][b]peanut allergy is not that bad compared to what else is out there![/i][/b]. This question reminds us we are lucky to have PA rather than something worse.
Quote:Originally posted by gwarboy:
[b]I must ask mommabear to not post anything like this again. [/b]
There are no rules regarding what may be asked at this site. If anything racist/offensive/etc is posted, the moderator (Chris) will delete it. But what gives [i][b]you[/i][/b] the right to tell others what types of questions may be asked. The only person who has that right is the owner of this site (Chris) and he has said all questions are welcome.
Quote:Originally posted by gwarboy:
[b]You or your children wont starve because of a nestles crunch, gummi bears, or a taco.[/b]
I never read anyone at this site saying that their children would starve because they could not eat crunch, gummi bears, etc. In fact, it is the parents of children who do not have peanut allergies who are the ones who say that [i][b] their children will starve if their dear Johnny can't eat his peanut butter sandwich every day for lunch[/i][/b].
[This message has been edited by erik (edited March 11, 2003).]

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 12:29pm
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erik,
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 12:32pm
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why do i ask this not to be asked again? well, regardless what the almighty moderator states is ok, this site should be aimed at information regarding avoiding accidents. everyone has their free speech here on the net, just like every moron can shout racist comments or cuss anyone out. THATS WHY. It isnt right to call someone whitey, nigger, chink, or anything like that, but I guess since the moderator said it was okay that makes it right.
secondly, last time I checked, jelly was around the same price as pb. sure, not as healthy, but I'd rather be fat than dead.

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 12:49pm
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Quote:Originally posted by gwarboy:
[b]why do i ask this not to be asked again? well, regardless what the almighty moderator states is ok, this site should be aimed at information regarding avoiding accidents. [/b]
Chris (the moderator) [b]created[/b] and [b]paid[/b] for this site so [i][b]he[/i][/b] is the only one who will decide [b][i]who[/b][/i] this site is aimed at, [b][i]not [/b][/i]you
Quote:Originally posted by gwarboy:
[b]everyone has their free speech here on the net, just like every moron can shout racist comments or cuss anyone out. THATS WHY. It isnt right to call someone wxxxxx, nxxxxxx, cxxxxx, or anything like that, but I guess since the moderator said it was okay that makes it right. [/b]
Did you NOT read my posting. I wrote that the moderator would [i][b]remove anything offensive or racist that was posted[/i][/b]. He never said he said it was okay. What makes you assume he said that???? (And your language is inappropriate)
Quote:Originally posted by gwarboy:
[b]
secondly, last time I checked, jelly was around the same price as pb. sure, not as healthy, but I'd rather be fat than dead.[/b]
What does this have to do with anything??????? And why would jelly make you fat? I think you have been putting too much cheap no-name merlot on your frozen waffles, and kids can not handle merlot.
[This message has been edited by erik (edited March 12, 2003).]

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 12:55pm
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1 my point wasnt whether CHRIS said anything was okay. I was pointing out that just because ANY MODERATOR lives with something, doesnt make it ok
2. I dont have kids. I AM THE PEANUT ALLERGENIC PERSON IN THIS FAMILY. and you were the one who said that everyone was saying my kid will starve cause he cant eat pb sandwiches.
3. I am crying right now, becaue I am scared that chris will remove my post. really. I'm not joking. seriously. if you could provide an address, I will put my tears in a jar and mail them to you.

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 1:04pm
erik's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by gwarboy:
1 my point wasnt whether CHRIS said anything was okay. I was pointing out that just because ANY MODERATOR lives with something, doesnt make it ok
*** you were telling us [b]what[/b] should be posted at this site, that was your point - and you wrote [b][i]"regardless what the almighty moderator states is ok, this site should be aimed at information regarding avoiding accidents"[/i][/b] which sounds to me like you are talking about the PA.COM moderator***
2. I dont have kids. I AM THE PEANUT ALLERGENIC PERSON IN THIS FAMILY. and you were the one who said that everyone was saying my kid will starve cause he cant eat pb sandwiches.
*** you were saying we thought [b]kids with PA would starve if they didn't eat gummi bears[/b] - I wrote [i]"the parents of children who do not have peanut allergies who are the ones who say that their children will starve if their dear Johnny can't eat his peanut butter sandwich every day for lunch" [/i]. - this is [b]not[/b] referring to you ***
3. I am crying right now, becaue I am scared that chris will remove my post. really. I'm not joking. seriously. if you could provide an address, I will put my tears in a jar and mail them to you.
*** if you don't care if your posts get removed, [b]why do you waste your time posting them here[/b]- there must be better things to do with your time while you are on spring break. And you are the one who wrote
[i][b]"this site should be aimed at information regarding avoiding accidents"[/i][/b].
What does sending a jar of tears through the postal system have to do with providing "[i]information regarding avoiding accidents[/i]"? ****
I am just sorry I spent 10 minutes replying to your post as that's 10 minutes of my life I'll never get back.
I don't know why you have such hostility towards this site and what people have posted here.
[This message has been edited by erik (edited March 12, 2003).]

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 1:08pm
erik's picture
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Actually, I changed my post since it was a waste of space. Instead I will mention I ate a tasty Canadian Nestle Kit Kat bar tonight and it was great [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
(didn't dip it in merlot though)
[This message has been edited by erik (edited March 11, 2003).]

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 10:52pm
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gwarboy,
Are you in the military?

Posted on: Tue, 03/11/2003 - 11:15pm
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Joined: 12/18/2001 - 09:00

gwarboy, I respect the opinions of everyone on this board. Whether their opinions are the same as mine or not. I read your post and respect your opinion. But I have to say, I see nothing wrong with this thread. The only thing it did for me was again remind me how lucky we are that PA is the worst we have to deal with, and I think that was the point of it.
Please remember too, that while you have PA, you are an adult with PA and responsible for yourself. A lot of people here are dealing with their child's PA, and that puts them in charge of keeping someone else alive and safe. I am responsible for my child's life, and it is a hard thing to know that if I ever let my guard down and slip up, it could cost my child her life. So we are looking at this from two different perspectives.
Lastly, I see posts here sometimes that I think are "not necessary" for lack of a better term. But then I think, you know what, that's my opinion, maybe someone here is really getting something helpful out of what I consider "not necessary". So in those cases I just choose not to participate in those threads, but would never condemn anyone else for participating in them.
I do agree with you that some people act like PA is the worst thing in the world and they need to snap out of it! But I think that each person needs to come to that point on their own and that threads like this help people see that the grass is not always greener on the other side.
Again, thank you for your posts. If we all agreed on the same things and no one had differing views, this world would be an awful boring place! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
Respectfully,
kcmom

Posted on: Wed, 03/12/2003 - 12:47am
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]gwarboy,
Are you in the military?
[/b]
Good question. It took me a few minutes to get the point (I am slow in the morning) but now I do get it.
As they say, the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

Posted on: Wed, 03/12/2003 - 1:16am
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Quote:Originally posted by erik:
[b]
As they say, the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.[/b]
BOINK! It is also interesting to note the letters "b-o-y".

Posted on: Wed, 03/12/2003 - 1:24am
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by kcmom:
[b]gwarboy, I respect the opinions of everyone on this board. Whether their opinions are the same as mine or not. I read your post and respect your opinion. [/b]
Hi kcmom,
Thank you for your logical and sensible post. You have explained why we [b]do not ban any questions[/b] at this web site (such as MommaBear's question) in an eloquent and sensible manner. I hope that gwarboy will read what you have written and respond to you in a more productive manner than [i] I'm not joking. seriously. if you could provide an address, I will put my tears in a jar and mail them to you [/i]

Posted on: Wed, 03/12/2003 - 3:55am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Just FYI you guys. [b]Gwar[/b] is the name of a heavy metal group. My former brother-in-law, who was also a skinhead racist, was a huge fan of the group. I don't think they recruit metalheads like gwarboy for the military. Just FYI.

Posted on: Wed, 03/12/2003 - 4:45am
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Cayley's Mom:
[b]Just FYI you guys. Gwar is the name of a heavy metal group. I don't think they recruit metalheads like gwarboy for the military. Just FYI.
[/b]
Hi Carolyn,
I guess that rules out gwarboy being belezubub's son (which I assume is the reason that Momma Bear asked if he is in the military)

Posted on: Wed, 03/12/2003 - 7:07am
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

Ahah! Thanks for clearing that up! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] I must be even slower than you, Erik, and it's not morning!!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam

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