If you had a \"magic wand\", would you trade your child\'s PA for.......................

Posted on: Fri, 01/17/2003 - 9:41pm
MommaBear's picture
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diabetes, seizure disorder, learning disability, hearing impairment, or blindness? Is there a health impairment or physical disability you would trade it for? Do you think your child would agree with you?

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 18, 2003).]

Posted on: Fri, 01/17/2003 - 9:48pm
river's picture
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Joined: 07/15/1999 - 09:00

This is a tough one Mommabear, and it's kinda weird to try and answer it. LD is probably my first choice. There are lots of resources in the community, (if you live in a big urban area), for the blind and hard of hearing. In the right location you can live a quality life. Diabetes and seizures would likely be closer to what it's like to live with PA because it involves diet, unpredictable reactions, and possible death.
Well, I guess I have to choose LD because it's not threatening to the health and it's workable, (it's also a very sketchy diagnosis with encompasses a vast array of symptoms.)

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 4:07am
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My child is not PA, I have the allergies. But having a husband who is dyslexic, and I myself working disabled children...Hmmmm. It would be a difficult decision. Personally, from what I've seen my husband go through with dyslexia I'd never pick LD. You still have to go through a ton of educating people, and even then, a lot of people have treated DH like he's dumb-and he's the smartest person I know. It really has affected him psychologically. Also, there's very few services here for LD kids...and an interesting statistic is that many kids who are LD and who have no support eventually get into drugs, alcohol and crime. (DH is researching this, he's very passionate about LD and helping kids). If I could pick ANY condition...well-they ALL have difficulties, and while the grass may seem greener on the other side, no matter what you pick you'll still have to educate people, and still have your moments of heartbreak. They all have their limitations on your children. (although you were right, kids with LD, with the right support can do wonderfully well-dh has a Masters degree in Psych and is getting one right now in social work). For me personally, I'd keep my allergy. (of course it's easy for me to say though, I don't have a severe one)

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 4:37am
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Anonymous (not verified)

So, would I trade it for something that was not life threatening (although I believe diabetes can be?)? Wowser. That should keep my mind occupied while I lie here with my migraine for the next several hours. And would my guy agree with me? Hmm.
MommaBear, I have to say that you have been asking some really thought provoking, discussion provoking questions. I know that I ask a lot of questions [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] but I have to say that yours are much deeper than mine are and much more interesting to answer.
I'm going to have to think about it.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 7:06am
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Momma Bear, great question. Especially when I realized I'd stick with the PA.
Scary as it is, I think LD is worse. So many people think that LDs end at 3:00 when school lets out, but it simply isn't true. They affect self-esteem, relationships, employment, etc. Depending on the LD, there can be no end to the ramifications. I would definitely choose PA over diabetes, celiac, seizure disorders.
Gee, who ever would have thought PA was desirable? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Amy

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 7:43am
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[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 11:09am
AlwaysAvoidAnaphylaxis's picture
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Joined: 06/23/2001 - 09:00

When we were at DS pulmonary appointment this week, we sat next to a 9 year old boy who just had his second open heart surgery because he was born with a heart valve that does not grow as his heart grows. And, I thought wow, we have a lot to be thankful for.
What would I trade food allergy for? Hmmm......not blindness, not deafness, not a LD, not diabetes, not a seizure disorder, ....good question. Wouldn't trade it for any of these.....how about a physical deformity ? nope.
i need to think about this one. probably nothing else or maybe would trade it for a problem that could be cured with a surgical procedure....

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 12:05pm
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Joined: 03/19/2002 - 09:00

No, I wouldn't trade my child's PA for any other serious ailment. When people say, "Wow, that must be really hard to have a child with severe allergies!", I always think how it could be soooo much worse. How sad for some children to have a really horrible disease, and that we really are lucky. Yes, it is scary, but it is manageable, and he will be OK. He is a terrific kid. Allergies are only one very small part of who he is, and I wouldn't change a thing. (although, if the supposed vaccine were to be approved, someday, I would sure be happy!)
Andrea

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 12:37pm
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Joined: 09/01/2006 - 09:00

andrea: i'm with you. IF we had to get something, thank God it was this. (did that sound bad?) i just think of everything else that people deal with and i at least know that my kids have something that we can protect them from and/or treat if something should happen. i'd rather them have no health concerns but we've got PA. my girls are so respectful of other peoples' special needs as a result which is a kind of nice effect too. i have never been an aggressive person and have let people walk all over me all my life (seriously). with PA i have learned to be aggressive when necessary and outspoken. i may not have ever learned to stand up for myself, but you can bet i'll do it for my kids. i figure one day i may even get around to being brave enough to stand up for myself! Joey

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 2:20pm
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Joined: 09/21/2002 - 09:00

I know this most amazing woman who lost an arm awhile ago...she does more with her 1 arm then I do with 2. She is absolutely incredible and I have a great deal of respect for her.
If *I* had to be disabled...I'd pick being deaf. But that is likely because I work with deaf children, and know sign language. My comfort zone is okay there.

Posted on: Sat, 01/18/2003 - 11:55pm
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

I definitely would not trade my dd's peanut and nut allergies for any of the "ailments" that you mentioned. I surely agree with Going Nuts about the learning disabilities. I wouldn't have asked for dd to have pa and tna if I had been given a choice; and there was a long time when I thought "why her??? Why are there so many other kids without allergies?????" Now I am far more accepting. Yes it is a burden, as we all know. But, now that Leah is 8, I am actually finding the stress a lot less. I think she is accepting of it; having grown up with it. There is always the possibility of an accidental reaction, and of course we must be prepared and careful at all times. But, I now accept it as just the way life is, and I think Leah does too. (Of course, it does help that Leah has been reaction free for over three years, knock on wood. She clearly must not be as sensitive as some other people are - which I know makes quite a difference in our lives.)
One of my best friends growing up is blind. He did incredibly well, considering. But - wow - when I look back on how tough it must have been for him it boggles my mind. There but for the grace of God.... Miriam

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