If Immune System Compromised, Greater Risk of Reaction?

Posted on: Mon, 12/16/2002 - 11:41pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

This is something I thought about after Jesse's reaction yesterday. If one's immune system is already compromised, say, with a cold, like Jesse's was, are you at greater risk of having a reaction (anaphylactic or otherwise) than you would be if you didn't have anything *wrong* with you?

Or, are allergic reactions totally separate from how your immune system is functioning?

Many thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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Posted on: Tue, 12/17/2002 - 3:25am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

It's my understanding that allergies are the result of an over-active immune system, not a compromised one, and that allergies do not affect illness (colds, flu, etc...)
I recently asked this of my allergist recently because my son was getting sick so often at school - no surprise because this is his first year, but I wondered if it could have been made worse because of his allergies. She said no - but it could be that he is asthmatic - he gets sick first, and well last, and coughs forever! He has not been diagnosed with asthma.
I have read somewhere - probably here - that one is at higher risk if he has had a reaction recently, though. The system is 'on alert,' more sensitive, already agitated. However you want to look at it.
Don't know if any of this is correct - just what I've been told or read.

Posted on: Tue, 12/17/2002 - 6:02am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Lam, thank-you! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I appreciate any response with this one. What I read in your post made sense to me (of course, that doesn't mean anything really [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] )
With your son, is the doctor reluctant to diagnose asthma, and, if so, for any particular reason? Jesse is the same, he will be the first one sick in the house, the last one well and he's coughing up a storm the whole time. We've been very fortunate (touch wood) that he hasn't need Pedi-Pred for a couple of years at least now due to his asthma during the winter months.
Lam, I also read the last part of your post here and I actually thought it was you who had posted the information. If you've had a reaction recently, your body is on high alert and you could possibly react again quickly to something that you may not have reacted to otherwise (different, better wording was used). I really did think that it was you who had posted that information.
I know that in speaking with my best friend to-day, she did say that Jesse's body wouldn't really be well for a week after the shock or trauma of what happened to it yesterday.
Many thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Tue, 12/17/2002 - 9:08am
KarenH's picture
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Joined: 09/21/2002 - 09:00

The one time that I had a large reaction to an allergy shot, I was told that the risk of my having a large reaction was greater if I was sick, tired, or went out and exercised. Hmmmm...interesting.

Posted on: Tue, 12/17/2002 - 10:35am
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Perhaps it is because if you are sick, your body is already on "alert mode" trying to eradicate the invading infection?
My elder (non-PA) son just developed cold urticaria (basically, an allergic reaction to the cold resulting in hives) - just bloody lovely. Anyway, our allergist told us that this happens most often just after a virus, and indeed he just had a cold. We're hoping it will be transient, as we have been told that it often goes away a few weeks after the illness.
Amy

Posted on: Tue, 12/17/2002 - 1:25pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Going Nuts, not even a response to your post because I'm not really here thinking wise, but I have to say that that is the first time I have ever seen you use the adjective (?) bloody. The thing is, my dear woman, you can't use it, you're American! It's some Canadian derivative from our still having the Queen of England on our money. Actually, I thought it was quite cute. I was telling someone on the phone last night that I post the word bloody because I really usually want to post the word f***ing and I feel that would be offensive, especially considering the amount of bloody's I use! LOL! Cute, it's catching! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Tue, 12/17/2002 - 2:05pm
mae's picture
mae
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Joined: 07/12/2002 - 09:00

This is interesting as DS has had a cold for about 10 days now - and on the weekend was quite sick - not flu - just vomiting lots of mucous, lethargic, no appetite. The Dr. has put him on FloVent and wants to send him back to the Allergist to test for asthma.
A couple of weeks ago he was throwing up every morning - Dr. thought it was the tail end of a viral infection, but I have a feeling its more than that.
He's also had more "allergy symptoms" this week, too. Good thread, Cindy.
So sorry to hear about Jesse's reaction. Hang in there!
mae [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 12/18/2002 - 1:27am
cynde's picture
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Joined: 12/10/2002 - 09:00

One of our allergists told us that our PA son would get sick (colds/flus) more often than non-allergic children. I can't remember if he gave a reason (he must have because I always ask why), and it must have made sense to me at the time. Has anyone else been told that?
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Cynde Punch

Posted on: Wed, 12/18/2002 - 4:18am
Shawn's picture
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Joined: 09/07/1999 - 09:00

I've never heard this from a doctor, but from personal experience, I've found it to be true. I had to deal with pretty severe environmental allergies for about 15 years (better now, thanks to years of immunotherapy). Whenever I had a cold or other minor illness, I reacted more severely to allergens and irritants - for example, normally I could use scented laundry detergent or be around people wearing a little cologne with no problem. When I had a bad cold, I couldn't.

Posted on: Wed, 12/18/2002 - 4:19am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

No, cynde, I've never been told that, but then again, I've never been told much by any of the doctors I've dealt with re Jesse's PA.
I've basically learned what I know to-day from this website and learned extremely little from any doctor.
Do you trust your allergist? This might actually be a good question to approach FAAN with [url="http://www.foodallergy.org"]www.foodallergy.org[/url] to see what their response is. It might also be a good question to raise in a separate thread here so that people will really pay attention to the question and it won't get just lost in this thread.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Mon, 03/29/2004 - 3:29pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

momma2boys, still don't know if we have *the* answer yet, but I'm almost finished with the search. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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