ID/Medical Bracelets

Author:
Updated:
Original:

Do you all recommend getting these for peanut allergies? If you have them can you give me an example of what yours say.

Thanks so much. Michelle

On Sep 28, 2005

My dd has only begun wearing her regulalry. I have her wear it to school each day, since she rides the bus and is without me. But, when I was with her all the time, I did not have her wear it.

In hindsight, it is good in case something happens to *you* and the children are taken by others for any period of time(like if yu have a health crisis or accident), or if they get lost somewhere, like a park. becca

On Sep 28, 2005

My 6 y.o. son, PA & TNA, wears a medic alert all the time and my 3 1/2 y.o. son, EA, wears a medic alert whenever we leave the house. Check out the medic alert website for info -- or call them, they have always been very nice when I've talked with them. My sons bracelets state "Anaphylaxis to (peanut & tree nut -- or egg depending on the son); treat with Benedryl and Epi-pen Jr." -- and it also has their member # on it. What goes on the bracelet can vary, from what I understand, according to your own situation. Wearing the bracelet is very important IMO, because you never know what will happen, where it will happen -- and along those lines -- who will be there in case something happens to you.

On Sep 28, 2005

I agree with having to wear a medic alert bracelet although I am waiting until my 7 year old is tested again Oct. 6th. I think I have been "crazy " up to now for his not having one. He was in the hospital to have his adnoids taken out and the operating room assistant asked us if he had any allergies and we told him yes to eggs and peanuts. He said good thing he asked because they had to use a different med to put him under because the most used one had an egg base. I keep thinking what if we were in an accident and he had to have surgery and we weren't able to tell the assistant that. I know this sounds like I am a horrible mother for his not having one, but I will order one ASAP. I just want to make other parents aware of the egg based anastetic.

On Sep 29, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by DWL: [b]\I know this sounds like I am a horrible mother for his not having one, but I will order one ASAP. [/b]

I do not think you're a horrible mother for not having one - if I did, I'd be one too! I still haven't gotten my 4 yr old one and almost ordered one 2 weeks ago but stopped. To my surprise, our allergist told me to hold off until we tested him again next year since his numbers were dropping.

I think *most* doctors are prepared to handle an allergic reaction in a hospital...especially anesthesiologists. I didn't react to sulpha until the 10th time I took it and it was a horrible reaction, lasted for a week. I don't wear a bracelet and I feel comfortable with that...

I'm not promoting not wearing one! I think people should, but I just don't think you're a horrible mother! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 29, 2005

DS just protested wearing his the other day, on the basis that I would be with him. I told him that in an emergency we could be separated. That was as far as I told him, but in reality, in a car accident, people in the same car are often brought to different hospitals. Even if he had a reaction and the ambulance took him, I might have to meet him at the hospital, so I wouldn't be there to give the other info (he has epilepsy as well-- if he had a seizure, they wouldn't realize that is part of his history). He doesn't like to wear it, and only does so about 2/3 of the time, because unless I make a point of checking his wrist before he goes out the door, he doesn't have it. But I'm making progress. For the first time, he came to me this morning for help putting it on. Without being reminded.

On Sep 29, 2005

I recently bought one for my son who is almost three. He won't wear it. I think it is very important for our PA children to have them in case of emergencies. Any tips on how to get him ot wear it? My Father wears one, and I thought for sure he would wear it because Grandpa has one, but.....

On Sep 29, 2005

My son couldn't ever figure out how to get his off. He stopped trying about an hour or two into it. He's left it alone ever since - about 3 years now.

------------------ Sherlyn Mom to 5 year old twins Ben & Mike - one PA & the other not. Stay Informed And Peanut Free!

On Sep 29, 2005

My 5 1/2 year old PA son has been wearing his bracelet since he was 3 1/2 and started preschool. I wanted it on him since he wasn't with me and it would be one last reminder to the teachers to not give him anything without asking me. He loved Dora the Explorer at the time and I told him he was going to wear a bracelet just like Dora wears a bracelet - it worked! He asked how long he had to wear it and we said forever. He made a fuss to take it off one time because the catch was poking out a little and scraping his arm. We fixed that and he hasn't taken it off except when he had tubes put in his ears this summer. The anesthesiologist required it to be off - we waited until he was loopy from the "happy juice" they gave him and then we just took it off. He never knew. Good luck!

On Sep 29, 2005

sorry - forgot to answer the original question. My son's bracelet says "severely allergic to peanuts - asthma" and has his id number and the 1-800 number. I know there was an old thread about wording because it was discussed that some people don't know what anaphylaxis or anaphylactic means. We chose severely allergic over life-threatening. I think the fact that they are wearing a Medic Alert bracelet and the bracelet mentions allergy to peanuts is enough to all medical professionals.

On Sep 29, 2005

Tip: Have engraved with more than just

On Sep 29, 2005

I stopped at the local fire station and talked to the paramedics about this very issue a few weeks ago. Dd wanted the gold one, and I wanted to be sure if it was turned around and all you could see was the chain, would the paramedics know to rotate the bracelet and see if it was a medic alert bracelet as opposed to just kid jewelry. Here is what they said: for wording, severe peanut allergy or anaphylaxis to peanuts is fine. They said no need to put carries epipen, as they would be using their own epi whether the child has an epipen or not. With their epi the dose is titrated to the weight and therefore more accurate, as opposed to the epipen which only comes in two different doses. They also did not know there was a gold medic alert bracelet until I showed them the medic alert catalog, and said if they simply saw the gold chain they would not look for a medic alert emblem. They would have thought it was just jewelry. They are still recommending the traditional silver one.

On Sep 29, 2005

Thanks so much for all your replies. That was exactly the info I was looking for.

michelle

On Oct 6, 2005

My daughter is 3 and I got a medical alert bracelet from Lauren's Hope online. They do look more like jewelry but they medical alert symbol is large and clear. For the real young, they only suggest the cotton rope chain due to choking hazzards. We state on the back due to her age: her first name, SEVERE peanut allergy, Mom's phone numbers. It is still a challenge to get her to wear it. That is why however, I chose something a little lighter.

On Oct 6, 2005

DD's reads

Anaphylaxis to peanuts Carries Epi-Pen

------------------ Love this site Synthia

On Oct 6, 2005

I went through the wording debate when we ordered my son's bracelet over 2 years ago. We decided against anaphylaxis because some people simply don't know what that means. It means something to those of us who are very familiar with it. That is why we went with severe. Hopefully, if it's a mother on the playground, she'll understand that simply because the child is wearing a medic-alert bracelet (or other form of medic-alert) that the allergy warrants serious attention. Otherwise, if the child would simply break out in a rash (like I would with my milk allergy as a child), why would they be wearing a Medic-alert bracelet? I'm not sure if I'm being clear but most people understand that a Medic-alert is for serious conditions. The 1-800 number on the bracelet will get the caregiver the exact protocol for treatment.

On Oct 6, 2005

Here is DS's wording:

1-800-number Asthma. anaphylaxis to peanuts & other nut products. Multiple foods. ID number

*I let them pick since there was so much info. Medicalert has all his meds & doctors & contact numbers. I am extremely comfortable with them. Aidan loves his bright orange sports band & wears it when we leave the house. It is a rule just like meds in the morning & night. (we can do it the easy or hard way rule) So he has accepted it quite well. He tells me that alot of people know he is PA, but that not everyone knows about the other allergies. So at 4 my baby "gets" it.

I never realized about carrying the epi being engraved on it. Next time I guess.

take care, mandi

On Oct 7, 2005

My DS is 4 now,but has been wearing one since 3. It really surprised me that he would wear one! I started by putting a stretch bracelet (one of mine) on him just to wear around the house for a little while. I also put one on and we made a game out of it and he thought it was a big deal.LoL! Ha! However, when he got the real thing in the mail, he was ready for it and now calls it his "Snake" bracelet. Now, it's always on when we go out. The EMT's here suggested that we get a bracelet while he's young. However, everyone has to make that decision on their own. Ours says anaphylaxis to peanuts and cashews.

[This message has been edited by TinaM (edited October 07, 2005).]

On Oct 7, 2005

Hi guys,

I just read in that new "allergic living" magazine(fall 2005), that in some Ontario cities, MedicAlert is offering free bracelets to any school child. They are testing this program out in Toronto and in London right now. The organization is in talks with schools in the western provinces and hopefully the next phase will be to the rest of Canada.

I'm in London and this has been offered to my child, however he has had his own since age 2(he is 8 now), and I don't mind paying for them if it helps someone else that can't afford them out. I can't tell you how many bracelets we have been through(lots) and he is allergic to the sports one which is nylon. He has had no problems with the stainless steel so this one is the one we will stick with for him.

On Oct 7, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Carefulmom: [b]They said no need to put carries epipen, as they would be using their own epi whether the child has an epipen or not.[/b]

Not all ambulances carry epi-pens. Some are volunteers who cannot dispense medicine but can give the medicine that has been prescribed for someone. So it would be helpful for those people to read about the epi-pen & they can then look for it if your child is not able to tell them where it is.

Also, it is often police who respond first to an emergency, not the ambulance.

My DD has been wearing a medic alert bracelet since a few weeks after her diagnosis at 20 months. She is now four. Hers reads, "Asthma; severely allergic to peanuts/all nuts. Treat with Epi-pen." I chose the word allergic because I didn't think police or an average good samaratan would understand what anaphalaxis meant.

E

------------------ Ellen Allergic to Shellfish/ Mom to Jesse 9/01 who has PA

Sometimes I just want to say "blah blah blah blah blah."

On Oct 7, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by dedwards331: [b]My daughter is 3 and I got a medical alert bracelet from Lauren's Hope online.[/b]

The coordinater at Children's Hospital told us about that website. The bracelets look absolutely awesome.

On a side note. We were told that emergency rooms rarely call the 800 number on the bracelet. I will be going to our local fire station and calling the ambulance company and hospitals to see if that is the case here.

If that is the case Emily will have a new bracelet from Laurens Hope. It will say something like this:

Life threatening allergy-Peanuts. With Mom and Dad's cell numbers.

On Oct 7, 2005

ElleMo, the ambulances don`t carry epipens, they carry epinephrine which gives a more exact dose. That was what the paramedic said. Maybe it depends on what state you live in. We are in California, so here the paramedics would not use dd`s epipen on her, they would instead give their own epinephrine to make the dose more accurate. They would do this whether her Medic Alert bracelet said she has an epipen or not. If they see someone in anaphylaxis they are going to give their own epinephrine.

On Oct 7, 2005

It definitely does depend on where you live. In my county in NC, they are just rolling out a program to have EMT's carry and administer epinephrine (also other asthma meds and nitroglycerine). Currently, if you dial 911 and do not request advanced life support, you will get an EMT from a fire station most likely and they cannot administer epinephrine (even your own epi-pen). You'd have to wait for a paramedic on an ambulance which usually follows closely behind if they know why you've called for help.

My son and I went to the volunteer fire chiefs meeting in our county and we were the visual aids in the presentation so they could put a face with the need to be able to carry and administer the drug. I'll be glad when we can know if we need help and for some reason don't have our epi-pen or if someone has a reaction for the first time and they don't have an epi-pen, that they'll be able to be helped.

It absolutely blew my mind when I found out our EMT's didn't carry the medicine. I'm thankful for the change!

On Oct 7, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Carefulmom: [b]ElleMo, the ambulances don`t carry epipens, they carry epinephrine which gives a more exact dose. That was what the paramedic said. [/b]

Yes, paramedics carry epinephrine. But in most states volunteer ambulancescannot not. They can only give medication that the patient already has (like the epi-pen or a diabetic's insulin.) In my area we have volunteers & paramedics. The volunteers (first aid squad) will often get to a person first & then can give an epi-pen that the patient already has. So depending on the situation, I may wait for the paramedics or may go with the volunteers & some of my epi-pens to the hospital.

In some areas of the country, you may have access to only volunteers who do not have any epinephrine.

------------------ Ellen Allergic to Shellfish/ Mom to Jesse 9/01 who has PA

Sometimes I just want to say "blah blah blah blah blah."

On Oct 9, 2005

Same here. Volunteer ambulance squads, and they DO NOT carry epipens/epiphedrine, but will HELP administer patient's epipen if prescribed to patient with his/her name on it.

I just received our bracelets last week. We went with the free (with $35 MedicAlert membership) stainless steel bracelets. They are too big (5yo and 4yo can slide them off) so I may have to have a jeweler take out a few links.

Ours says:

ALLERGIC TO PEANUTS, TREENUTS, SESAME, SHELLFISH, MELONS. MOTHER AND SCHOOL CARRY EPIPEN JR AND BENADRYL. MEMBER NUMBER / 800#

Yes they fit all that!

My kids will wear them when they're not with me (school, playdates, bday parties). The preschools have been great and I'm not worried, but I'm using it as a reminder, mostly to the other parents so when playdates/bday party times come, they are aware of the allergy. That is where I have had the hardest time in the past.

Related