I never thought of this

Author:
Updated:
Original:

My DH was talking to his boss the other day and she mentioned she has a nephew with a peanut allergy.

She said he only had his firt reaction when he was 2 and then not another one until he was 16.

My DH thought that was pretty good and asked what had caused his reaction.

Seems that this boy went out with some friends, got drunk and ate some food with peanuts in it. He did not remember eating it and had a reaction.

I had never thought about this before. Have any of you?

Jan

On Jan 11, 2007

Do you mean you did not think about eating the wrong food when drunk?

Sure. I talked to my son about that lots. He's 22 now and I know he drinks some but he's not the type to get drunk. But we discussed that when you are drunk your decisions might not be the best about what you are eating. etc etc.... Your taste might not be the same either and you might miss feeling a reaction if you were drunk.

One thing is he would never stay somewhere if there were peanuts in the room but someone could always offer him something. So he knows he never accepts food from someone else unless he can read the label which goes back to being too drunk to read the label.

So I have to take it on trust that he's smart enough to not put himself in this position. Being drunk for him would be more dangerous than for some non allergic person.

We also talked about the dark. If you were in a pub or at a party it might be too dark to see what you are eating. Also movie theaters. Who knows if there is a peanut in the middle of all of that popcorn or whatever people eat in movies. We stopped eating in movies when the kids were little. So much cheaper and safer really.

I never wanted him to drink but I assumed once he hit college he would at least try it so we talked about this way before high school and all during high school.

Rides in my car were more like discussions between my son and myself. We did all of our best talking in the car and it worked out pretty well.

Good question.

Peggy

[This message has been edited by Peg541 (edited January 11, 2007).]

On Jan 11, 2007

I have absolutely thought about this. My dd is only 10 now but I worry about the college years.

Drinking is of course known to lower inhibitions and alter your decision making ability. I am concerned that she will drink with friends and not be as cautious of the food she eats. Someone may just say "This is ok" or she will just assume something is ok and eat it. Or even not be as aware of her surroundings or symptoms.

I also think open communication and discussions (not lectures [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]) are going to be the best way to prepare her and prevent this. But yes, scenarios such as this weigh on me....I seem to always be in "what if" mode. Thoughts such as these even wake me up in the middle of night.

On Jan 11, 2007

Yes!! Absolutely, this is something that we worry about...

we have definitely ALWAYS explained that alcohol and other drugs [i]impair your JUDGEMENT.[/i] Even in moderation. So we advise her (if she should choose to drink) to follow certain "rules" for behavior when she does. This is no different than what we as responsible adults model in our own behavior.

If either of us drinks (even ONE) we [i]do not drive[/i]. PERIOD. So for her, we have used this example as one of a "rule" that prevents us from using bad judgement after drinking. It's a rule. Even if we [i]feel[/i] fine to drive, we don't. We've explained that for her, following rules about food will be every bit as important.

We began speaking with her about this issue well before she was 5. As soon as she asked questions about drunk driving and alcohol consumption, quite honestly.

On Jan 11, 2007

Or...what if they were so drunk and had a reaction, people would probably just chaulk it up to *being loaded* and miss the allergy-emergency....that is also scary. I think talking to your child and also their friends, the close ones they hang out with. They need to also remember if anything unusual is happeneing to not be afraid to call 911. Then that opens up this whole thing with the kissing again....when your drunk, you don't think clearly, Then the whole *hooking up-thing*(the college-age crowd).....my son is only 6 and I have thought about all of this...years down the road. No wonder I am grey already!

On Jan 11, 2007

I guess I never thought about it because my son has never mentioned alcohol or anyone drinking, he is 6.

On Jan 11, 2007

I have been known to party pretty hard. Even when drunk, I have *never* eaten something I'm allergic to.

If I can't focus on the fine print, I generally know that it's long past time to sit down with a glass (or five) of water and pull out my stash of snacks from my purse.

(And no, I don't slam shots while pregnant, lest y'all get the wrong idea.)

ygg

On Jan 11, 2007

Glad to hear you're staying away from the hard stuff....

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

LOL!!

On Jan 11, 2007

Krasota...I was trying to make my reply as pc as I could....I too have had my fair share of drinking/dancing and partying....so i was trying to imagine what I did, but in his shoes....and that is a bit scary. We'd have a fun night at the bars and come home and eat, taco bell, pizza, you name it. But hopefully, he'll be able to also make his own decisions and choices and have a *stash* of munchies ahead of time, or don't eat....the list is endless all the things that *could* go wrong. But we survive non-the-less. Your comment was funny though....we're all human!

On Jan 11, 2007

I think we started discussing this when my son was in fifth grade and was assigned a DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) essay. I had an opportunity to help his write this and we discussed how his judgment about eating would be impaired under the influence of anything like drugs or alcohol. He wrote about it in his essay (I was really hoping he'd be one of the ones recognized at the DARE assembly for his insight but he wasn't).

He's 18 now and a freshmen in college - last year his group of buddies were apparently discussing drinking and DS mentioned his concern to his friends about ever being under the influence and his allergies - they told him one of them wouldn't drink to watch out for him if he ever wanted to try drinking. At the time he shared this with me, I was torn about what my response should be - (should I remind him that underage drinking is illegal?) but I decided I was more glad that his group of friends will look out for him. From what I gather now (he's away at college) though he's like the designated "nanny" he doesn't drink (it sounds to me) since he has multiple food allergies and alcohol doesn't have an ingredient labels.

On Jan 11, 2007

I worry about this too but more for other reasons. My ds is allergic to so many things. Yeast is one of them. I worry about peer pressure for him to drink and he can't drink anything with yeast in it or fermented. What happens if\when he succumbs to pressure\temptation. It's the same with smoking. He has asthma. What if he feels the need to experiment with smoking. Or drugs even. Who knows how he would react to any experimentation (and I think that most kids do some) with recreational drugs?

Barb

On Jan 11, 2007

Well, for once I am sort of glad dd is milk allergic in addition to pa. Almost anything anyone would offer her she would have a reaction to. This isn`t a chance she would take, even if drunk. When they are milk allergic in addition to pa, the lines are more clear, since almost anything they are offerred is unsafe.

On Jan 11, 2007

Yes we think about this. Statistically (from what I read a few years ago), fatalities with PA sharply increase after age 11. Dreading that birthday. It's the independence.

Add that to alcohol (assuming several years later), and it's extremely frightening. It's terrifying not only because of impaired judgement but also because alcohol can exacerbate a reaction. My first known reaction to chamomile was anaphylactic, and my doctor said that having wine (2 glasses) before putting lotion on my hand that had chamomile made my reaction more severe; it ripened my system for a more severe reaction.

So consuming alcohol puts FA folks in double jeopardy.

On Jan 11, 2007

This is actually something we thought about alot when raising chris. I have two brothers that have bartended and one is a chef. This was a very large part of our talks with Chris and he will probably never have an alcoholic beverage. He is very anti drinking and can not stand drunk people either. He will come right out and tell people that want to take him out for his 21st birthday that there is no way he will go and have a drink. I actually believe that he will not do it out of fear of the allergy. With our kids allergy we need to always be preparing them for the world ahead. Most people think I am nuts but I always prepare Chris for any thing there is out there. You should have heard the people that thought I was looney in the store one day when I found out there was RESEESES chap stick. I had to run home and explain it all to chris. He wasn't even dating yet but just in case it happened. I hate using this expression but "we really have to train our kids". Good luck Claire

On Jan 12, 2007

As far as I know, alcohol does exacerbate reactions. All three of my reactions have occurred after having had a few drinks (the night before - and before I knew what I was allergic to).

That said, I have never eaten something "peanutty" since - and I've been pretty drunk a lot of times...

[This message has been edited by MichelleR (edited January 12, 2007).]

On Jan 12, 2007

I've thought about it quite a bit. We'll have that discussion soon. I've had a different variation on it with my elder son, who is 16; we've discussed how any drug or alcohol intake impairs judgment, and can lead people to do things they normally wouldn't do. This is just another spin on it!

Oy, the things we have to worry about!

Amy

On Jan 12, 2007

I have thought about it, but I don't worry yet. DS is 8, and there's much more to worry about first. But since I am thinking about this right now, this thought just occurred to me. Worrying about our PA kids (either gender) drinking is similar to worrying about our daughters (in particular) being slipped GHB or something similar while drinking. We really need to teach them be on their guard BEFORE they start drinking.

------------------ [url="http://www.the3day.org/boston07/deedaigle"]http://www.the3day.org/boston07/deedaigle[/url]

On Jan 12, 2007

Don't forget it's what you drink as well as what you eat. My teen-age PA/NA/EA son asked if there were any drinks with nuts or eggs. I said sure, lots of them and listed a few off the top of my head. (Also talked about the hidden issues of things like wine being filtered through egg shells.) He's only 14 and some of his classmates (not friends) have already experimented. The fact that there is a possibility of drinking something that he's allergic to is so scarry to him he won't touch it.

Related