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Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:02am
lilpig99's picture
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Joined: 12/22/2005 - 09:00

All hail the cupcake queen. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:15am
ajas_folks's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by lilpig99:
[b]All hail the cupcake queen. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img][/b]
I think the old Bonking Wand we used to talk about here must have been invented for just those Cupcake Queens. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
~Eliz

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:34am
lilpig99's picture
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Joined: 12/22/2005 - 09:00

Yes, Elizabeth, it sounds like it would be quite appropriate [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img].

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:37am
lilpig99's picture
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Joined: 12/22/2005 - 09:00

Isn't the fact that the birthday child is bringing birthday treats for everyone, indicative of trying to have an [i]inclusive[/i] environment? The child certainly isn't bringing just his own cupcake, so everyone else can watch him eat it. No, that wouldn't be any fun, that would exclude others. Hence....well you know.
(This fact may have already been stated somewhere in this thread, but I'm just thinking out loud here..not re-reading.)

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:47am
notnutty's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2004 - 09:00

Yeah those cupcake queens can be very forceful [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]. Without the administration behind a policy, a policy is useless.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:50am
gvmom's picture
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Joined: 08/24/2005 - 09:00

The main point is that it isn't that the actual act of bringing food into the classroom for everyone to share isn't an inclusive act, with a purposeful motivation to exclude.... the point is that this is in a public institution, paid for with public tax dollars, with laws that they have to follow. It is that the school needs to meet their end of the bargain, being a state funded body.
If the school has entered into the legal bind of a 504, or even the argument of "Standard of Care", they have responsibilities to their students over and above the actions of what would be viewed as an act of sharing by one of the students.
They can recognize the generosity of those students wanting to include everyone in a non-educational social event, however, that doesn't override their responsibility to act in the parent's stead and/or according to a 504, and not allow something that would exclude a child, creating a potentially hazardess situation -- in a physical sense, in addition to creating a situation that causes mental harm due to ostracism and stigmatization.
(now I need to post that so I can read it in a normal format... WHEW)
[This message has been edited by gvmom (edited August 12, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:04am
ajas_folks's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

Good article posted over here today:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/002109.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/002109.html[/url]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:23am
lilpig99's picture
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Joined: 12/22/2005 - 09:00

'Teacher will not allow food that would exclude the child; creating a hazardous situation physically as well as mentally'
One could add this as an accomodation...make it binding legally.
You'd just have to sell it to them.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:24am
ajas_folks's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

Quote from [i] Food Allergies for Dummies [/i] by Robert A. Wood, MD with Joe Kraynak:
[i]Studies show that food allergy has a marked effect on quality of life, and this typically peaks in adolescence when the effects of being different are always magnified. [/i]
Quote is from Chapter 14: Empowering Your Adolescent or Teenager.
Somewhere today I read something online about truancy and boys -- a study in California, if I recall -- that ostracism in school is one of the main reasons why boys are truant.
~Eliz

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:30am
kelly01's picture
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Joined: 03/19/2001 - 09:00

Okay, thinking out loud here...do your really think that not having the same birthday treat as the other children results in ostracism (sp?) and stigmatization? I don't think my son is emtionallly scarred from this.
While it was a little tougher when he was younger, he has learned that an unsafe birthday treat brought in by an absent-minded parent does not equal a personal attack on him.
The reality of his life is he can't eat everything that every other child eats. I, personally, think his emotional well-being is healthier because he accepts this, (and takes steps to minimize missing things...like having his own treat box) and has moved on. [Ironic because he has just walked in the door from a lazertag birthday party. As it turns out, the cupcakes were may-contain, so he skipped them. He is not bothered in the least...as he knows I will let him have ice cream at home (a no-no usually in the middle of the afternoon at our house). He would tell you that the important part of the party was playing lazertag and NOT the food. I am glad he feels this way.]
Again, thinking out loud, not saying that what is right for us is right for everyone else.
kelly

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