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Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 4:18am
gvmom's picture
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I keep thinking about this for those of you who think I

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 4:18am
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[b]with allocated time,[/b]
Could this be part of the legal basis? Specific time allocated at school for food ingestion? Like lunch? But then here's the problem,-- the law allows for safe [i]substitution[/i] at lunchtime (via USDA Accomdating Children with Special ...)? They speak of discrimination occurring only when a substitution is not offered. The whole school is not required to be offered the same lunch. This might viewed as being legally acceptable for the classroom as well.
But I know what you're saying...a teacher wouldn't tolerate a non-food allergic child's parent uttering these words to your child 'You cannot eat this, you just sit there and wait until the other kids are finished.' So when we're the ones sending in safe snacks, have we become that parent?? Maybe so.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 4:29am
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]I keep thinking about this for those of you who think I

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 4:35am
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[b]Could this be part of the legal basis? Specific time allocated at school for food ingestion? Like lunch? But then here's the problem,-- the law allows for safe substitution at lunchtime (via USDA Accomdating Children with Special ...)? They speak of discrimination occurring only when a substitution is not offered. The whole school is not required to be offered the same lunch. This might viewed as being legally acceptable for the classroom as well.[/b]
You know though, this could be an interesting legal point. I'm going to have to go back through the booklet that goes with the USDA form for meal accommodations to review the language.
Point is, if the school spends enough time to find a safe substitution at other times, why not just dispense the safe substitution for all?
[b]I don't doubt it. I've always said there were some lessons I'd never be able to teach them, nor provide the environment they occur in, myself. Especially a lot of those that have to do with human nature.[/b]
There are lessons that I know I couldn't teach them.... but I wish they could have been older for some of the things they are learning. It saddens me to know some of the stuff they are learning about human nature. [i]Your mother better love you...[/i] right?!
[b]Spartans Rule! Beware though, it's not a philosophy easily bridled and not as effective when applied inconsistently or on a whim. It tends to permeate it's environment.[/b]
Well, I still keep toying with my t-shirt idea. Lots of activist slogans I keep thinking of that I'd love to wear through the halls. And I do think they'd be very consistent with my actions. I'm sure some of them already feel my "I Hate You" shirt, even though I haven't made it....YET!

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 4:54am
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]There are lessons that I know I couldn't teach them.... but I wish they could have been older for some of the things they are learning. It saddens me to know some of the stuff they are learning about human nature. [i]Your mother better love you...[/i] right?![/b]
High five, but with extreme sobriety.
Quote:[b]Well, I still keep toying with my t-shirt idea. Lots of activist slogans I keep thinking of that I'd love to wear through the halls. And I do think they'd be very consistent with my actions. I'm sure some of them already feel my "I Hate You" shirt, even though I haven't made it....YET!
[/b]
Then I'm sure you can appreciate my idea: "I'm breeding your kind out of the gene pool." (in neon green alien puffy paint on a black maternity shirt.
I should make it in time to register my children at the district office for school this week. I'm just starting to show. Won't they be surprised?
I've avoided registration. Just haven't been able to bring myself to do it.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 5:11am
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I really appreciate all of the thoughts and views in this thread. It really has helped me to think about this school year.
As I was thinking about all of the views in this thread I was answering to the computer--for both sides of this point of view.
I would love to have a food free classroom. There is no need to spend so much time on food. And I generally feel that way most of the day--outside of school. Why does everything revolve around food. I don't know if I feel that way because of my children or if I would feel that way without their allergies--I wouldn't be able to seperate the reasoning.
I also appreciate the lessons that my children have/will learn from this situation.
Our number one rule--no food ever from anyone but Mom and Dad (and after a few years--Grandma and Grandpa). What a great way to enforce this, they have to have their food from the snack box, backpack or lunchbox. You (talking to my children) are in charge of saying no thank you I have food allergies I will have food at a different time, or from a safe source.
Another lesson my children learn--Life is not fair, you are different from other people. Every person has something different or special about themselves. Yours (again talking to my children) just happens to be with food. This is not going to change, you will need to accept this fact and move on to the next thing. (I'll cry in my room at night for you--you don't need to see how much I wish you didn't have to deal with this)
My children also learn that they must find their voice and they must become independent. And I prefer for them to learn this--now--when they are younger--in a little bit of a protected environment. The reality is that we have been very lucky in the adults that have encountered my children. Do they all get it--no--but they all understand the importance of letting me make those decisions for my children.
On the other hand my 2 children are very different peronality wise from each other. My older child handles not being included with food, waiting for a "treat" at a different time, and he is ok with being different. He still sucks his thumb (in 2nd grade) it drives us insane--and whenever we ask if kids make fun of him he states--If they make fun of me--they aren't my friends, just like, if they make fun of me for not eating peanuts, I don't need to be frineds with them. I can't ever argue against that--and what a valuable lesson he has learned.
That said my younger son has a much harder time with this concept and it does hurt him in very obvious emtional ways. And of course that tears my heart out and I want to do nothing but make it all fair (I want to for my older son-but I am grateful that his soul is different--or maybe it has become different). But, I can't and he has a long life ahead of him to learn how to deal with the fact that he is different. And I want him to deal with that before he realizes that our family is different in other ways--we have different finances than others, we have different views on accaptable movies, or tv shows. We are not all talented in the same way..ect..
I don't know what the answer is--or what the right answer should be. And I really really really would love it if our culture was not about food, but, I can't change everything. I need to provide my children the tools to survive life and to work with the culture we live in. I know it is the same argument that people use for not banning peanuts (which I am for most days). And my kids do sit at a peanut free table--that I asked for, they do not have a 504--one goes to a large private school, one goes to a small private school. And thankfully most days I worry more about if my son will pass the timed math test than what snack was served at school. But my heart still skips a beat during lunch time,snack time, and whenever the school number comes up on caller id.
No answers--just thoughts.
------------------
Michelle mom to:
DS #1- 7 - peanut, tree nut, asthma,environmental allergies
DS-#2- 4- Milk, Peas, Peanuts, Tree nuts, Asthma, environmental allergies

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 5:46am
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gvmom: Forgive me, I am coming to this thread a little late and have not read the entire thread in detail, but wanted to offer another avenue.
Perhaps you could ask you school board to institute a wellness policy that requires non-food birthday celebrations. Our school's policy is written:
"Our district has developed a wellness policy which purpose is 'to assure a school environment that promotes and protects student's health, well-being, and ability to learn by supporting healthy eating and physical activity.' At the elementary level this means:
*vending machines are not available during school hours.
*Teachers/staff will not use food as rewards.
*physical activity is important. We will not regularly consequence children by withholding recess time.
*Food items will not be permitted for birthday celebrations.
*snacks brought into the classromm should be age appropriate and healthy choices."
My son's classroom goes further to help with his FA and peanuts or made in facility products are not allowed in the classroom.
I find the wellness policy goes along very well with food allergies. It limits the teacher's discretion to allow cupcakes, candy, etc...
We still had some issue come up last year. Twinkies were brought into the classroom once for a birthday. The teacher called me and asked me if they were safe for ds. I said "yes, but isn't it against the wellness policy anyway?" She said "oh yeah" and sent them back home with a note.
I think as my son gets older the policy changes a bit at the middle school level, but I have decided to deal with middle school in 5 years and not worry right now.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 5:56am
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Ask yourself about the peanut free table, if in fact you do not like the idea of a peanut free table because it is not 'least restrictive', why is it restrictive? Because it is excludes the peanut allergic child, right? Does OCR specifically talk about the exclusive nature of peanut free tables, or was there a law suit about it? If so, they might already be legislating 'anti-exclusive' concepts.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 5:57am
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[b]Perhaps you could ask you school board to institute a wellness policy that requires non-food birthday celebrations.[/b]
Our district does have a wellness policy. In fact, so does our state. It developed guidelines for districts.
Non-food celebrations are encouraged. Healthy foods are encouraged. Nothing is set as THE rule that HAS to be followed though.
Everybody loves a loophole. Especially cupcake queens.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:00am
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[b]Point is, if the school spends enough time to find a safe substitution at other times, why not just dispense the safe substitution for all?[/b]
Then I would wonder how they would accomodate MFA's at the school. That can get really tricky.
edited to add bold
[This message has been edited by lilpig99 (edited August 12, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:02am
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All hail the cupcake queen. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:15am
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Quote:Originally posted by lilpig99:
[b]All hail the cupcake queen. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img][/b]
I think the old Bonking Wand we used to talk about here must have been invented for just those Cupcake Queens. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
~Eliz

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:34am
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Yes, Elizabeth, it sounds like it would be quite appropriate [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img].

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:37am
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Isn't the fact that the birthday child is bringing birthday treats for everyone, indicative of trying to have an [i]inclusive[/i] environment? The child certainly isn't bringing just his own cupcake, so everyone else can watch him eat it. No, that wouldn't be any fun, that would exclude others. Hence....well you know.
(This fact may have already been stated somewhere in this thread, but I'm just thinking out loud here..not re-reading.)

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:47am
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Yeah those cupcake queens can be very forceful [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]. Without the administration behind a policy, a policy is useless.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 6:50am
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The main point is that it isn't that the actual act of bringing food into the classroom for everyone to share isn't an inclusive act, with a purposeful motivation to exclude.... the point is that this is in a public institution, paid for with public tax dollars, with laws that they have to follow. It is that the school needs to meet their end of the bargain, being a state funded body.
If the school has entered into the legal bind of a 504, or even the argument of "Standard of Care", they have responsibilities to their students over and above the actions of what would be viewed as an act of sharing by one of the students.
They can recognize the generosity of those students wanting to include everyone in a non-educational social event, however, that doesn't override their responsibility to act in the parent's stead and/or according to a 504, and not allow something that would exclude a child, creating a potentially hazardess situation -- in a physical sense, in addition to creating a situation that causes mental harm due to ostracism and stigmatization.
(now I need to post that so I can read it in a normal format... WHEW)
[This message has been edited by gvmom (edited August 12, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:04am
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Good article posted over here today:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/002109.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/002109.html[/url]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:23am
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'Teacher will not allow food that would exclude the child; creating a hazardous situation physically as well as mentally'
One could add this as an accomodation...make it binding legally.
You'd just have to sell it to them.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:24am
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Quote from [i] Food Allergies for Dummies [/i] by Robert A. Wood, MD with Joe Kraynak:
[i]Studies show that food allergy has a marked effect on quality of life, and this typically peaks in adolescence when the effects of being different are always magnified. [/i]
Quote is from Chapter 14: Empowering Your Adolescent or Teenager.
Somewhere today I read something online about truancy and boys -- a study in California, if I recall -- that ostracism in school is one of the main reasons why boys are truant.
~Eliz

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:30am
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Okay, thinking out loud here...do your really think that not having the same birthday treat as the other children results in ostracism (sp?) and stigmatization? I don't think my son is emtionallly scarred from this.
While it was a little tougher when he was younger, he has learned that an unsafe birthday treat brought in by an absent-minded parent does not equal a personal attack on him.
The reality of his life is he can't eat everything that every other child eats. I, personally, think his emotional well-being is healthier because he accepts this, (and takes steps to minimize missing things...like having his own treat box) and has moved on. [Ironic because he has just walked in the door from a lazertag birthday party. As it turns out, the cupcakes were may-contain, so he skipped them. He is not bothered in the least...as he knows I will let him have ice cream at home (a no-no usually in the middle of the afternoon at our house). He would tell you that the important part of the party was playing lazertag and NOT the food. I am glad he feels this way.]
Again, thinking out loud, not saying that what is right for us is right for everyone else.
kelly

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:44am
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But what of the child that it *does* affect? Wouldn't it be best to include all?

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:45am
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gvmom, I know I'm not giving you what you are really hoping for in this thread...I just can't think of much from the legal standpoint.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 7:52am
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Quote:Originally posted by lilpig99:
[b]But what of the child that it *does* affect? Wouldn't it be best to include all?[/b]
I will come back later to expand on this, but, our child is clearly one who is profoundly affected emotionally by this . . . partly due to his own emotional coping abilities, or lack there of, and partly due to the other childrens' (and staff's) "in-your-face" treatment of him with regard to the ostracism as to birthday & other celebrations in class.
But I have whopper lightning all around & have to shut down . . .
I'll be back. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
~Eliz
Edited to fix wording for clarity.
Also to add -- I feel fortunate that I've been able to recognize and respond to our son's negative emotional responses (and, frankly, deep resentment and anger manifestations) as to his peanut allergy and mistreatment (perceived or otherwise) by classmates and staff at his school.
I know I am not alone.
I dare say that there may be some in the PA community who are not aware (yet) of the possible emotional toll that this allergy may be taking on his/her child. Some children are masters at hiding pain. Some manifestations may be delayed . . .
It is a delicate-enough balancing act raising a child to be emotionally healthy when that child is already seemingly "normal" in all ways and/or "main stream" in all ways. But throw a wrench into the works as to a permanent, often negatively singling-out characteristic & the parent may often find himself/herself dropping off that tightrope and into the net below. Just pray the net holds each time. Or that there even IS a net.
~E
[This message has been edited by ajas_folks (edited August 12, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 8:55am
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From Texas Association of Student Councils Handbook 2004 --
[b] [i]
A safe school environment includes the following:
>Physical safety which is freedom from threats and physical harm, aggression, injury and damage to property
>Emotional safety which includes freedom from rejection, ostracism, social exclusion, isolation, mocking, taunting, name-calling, sarcasm, racially or sexually abusive comments, and humiliation. [/i] [/b]
Schools everywhere seem to be focused more & more on the safety & security, in all aspects, of our children while in the "care" of the school.
Maybe some consistency & enforcement by the district to go along with policy?
~Eliz
[This message has been edited by ajas_folks (edited August 12, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 9:18am
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[b]gvmom, I know I'm not giving you what you are really hoping for in this thread...I just can't think of much from the legal standpoint. [/b]
I don't think I hope for much these days. And really that isn't a snap at you.... just the reality of my life.
I think the thing is, I'm thinking about it removed a few steps.
It can feel like a personal thing when parents ignore including your child. I mean, if we sent in cool stuff for all the kids but one, don't think it wouldn't get back to us... even if it was an accident in making a number count.
Point is though, this is about a public entity that our children are required by law to attend.
School isn't like the real world. There is all sorts of stuff there, that in the real world, we never would agree to with respect to our FA children. Or at least I wouldn't.
I wouldn't leave my kids with a person who was only required to be shown how to use an epi-pen and get a brief explanation of FA's -- would you? But, according to the law in most places, without a 504 that outlines agreed upon measures that hopefully are more extensive, that is what you get.
In the real world, a birthday party is more than, "come on in, sit down, eat a cupcake, leave". There is stuff that goes on... including parental supervision and parental okay about food consumption....that schools don't think they should be required to do.
I wouldn't send my 5 year old to a party without either DH or I, I wouldn't let him eat a cupcake that I didn't have the ability to check the ingredients on (and that means more than a casual "Does this have eggs?), and I wouldn't even take him to a party that the only thing to do was to sit down and eat a cupcake. Think about it. What if your kids were invited to a birthday party? Outside of school. The only thing happening at this party was the consumption of a cupcake. The parents were going all out. These cupcakes were going to be out of this world, decorated beyond belief, and completely unsafe for your child. And these people inviting you were wonderful, sweet, kind people. Near Mother Teresa.
Would you take your kid?
Do you think your child would want to go and sit amongst all the other kids, enjoying their special, amazing cupcake, while yours had what you could figure out from home?
Honestly, I'm okay with my kids being different, and for the most part they are okay with it too. But I'd skip that kind of party. If that goes on at school though, your child is legally bound to be there.
How about if that cupcake eating extravaganza were to happen at your house. Those wonderful people decided you shouldn't drive anywhere, so the entire party is coming to your house. Now, I guess if you allow your child's allergens in your home this won't be an issue. But I don't. My kids should be able to be safe in their classroom. They have a right to a safe school according to our state constitution. Shouldn't that extend to their personal safety in a classroom that they are mandated to be present in?
Of course, I also don't have a problem with laws requiring modifications providing access to the handicapped. My Dad and I had a big discussion about that one day when he was griping about some proposed plans to a firehouse. But that is another story..... though in the real world, are accommodations for disabilities dependant on the sanctioning of a local government are they? For those places receiving Federal and State funds, they are a must aren't they?
I guess I'm just thinking Bigger Picture. Plus, I'm also thinking from my point of view. With my experiences from this last year... and those prior. Which I wouldn't wish on anyone.
Holding the school responsible for what it is they are required by law to do, when our kids are mandated to be there, is what I want. That is why the questions about legalities about exclusion & "Standard of Care".

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 9:22am
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BTW, that big diatribe from me above just now is I guess more of my thinking as a response to kelly's post.
Sorry, long day here.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 10:54am
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]I guess I'm just thinking Bigger Picture. [/b]
LUKE, I am your father... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] (SCHWOOOP-ahhhh)

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 10:58am
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Personally, when I think about my son, particularly when he was younger, he would have been more traumatized by having a special treat box - being centered out.
Our PA children learn quite quickly that they are different than other children and that it's not a visible physical disability so people don't see it - they have to be told about it.
I was trying to think of the threatening/bullying that I've posted about here and it had NOTHING to do with Jesse and a "peanut free" classroom that did not allow those unsafe cupcakes. Those incidents were totally separate.
Again, I have to say, that I must be really different because I felt it was healthier for my guy to feel that there was no need for him to be excluded (for his psyche) than it was to send a special treat box in and have him mortified.
And, again, posting in the thread because it was do-able. I've seen it done. Now I feel as though I've gone both insane and blind!
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
There but for the Grace of God, go I.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 12:26pm
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b].... and I'll tell you why.
Are schools allowed to celebrate Christmas, excluding their classmates that might have other faiths? Why would they be able to exclude a student, through something that isn't even and educational requirement, or necessary to their education in the classroom?
I feel that their teachers should have to look at my children, while they sit there, not being able to partake in what they allow to come through their doors. I also feel that the parents & students who want to bring in unsafe foods should also have to look at my children. They all should know that they are knowingly excluding my children. Sending in a safe treat already sets them apart. They won't be getting the same thing, or be able to be part of the so called sharing that people want to do when they bring in junk food. So why should I make it easier for them?
How many times do my children have to be excluded..... and in an "in your face way".....before their teachers and parents/students care enough to include them?
{PS. -- some of you know that I'm breaking my exile here, and only here, but I need input, opinions, legal thoughts.......}[/b]
I don't have anything to add about the legalities, but my experience is that schools (around here) seem to exclude children based on religion all the time. In first and second grade, they even wrote letters to Santa. The second year of this my DS protested arguing that kids who aren't Christian are excluded. It absolutely didn't help him make his case that his Hindu friend and his Jewish friend also gets visits from Santa and liked the activity.
With regard to the teachers having to care (I think that's basically what you are hoping for, right--because if they actively try to include it means they must care for our children, right?)--I don't know that this can be fostered in this way. I could be wrong. I think folks are used to seeing FA kids getting the short end of the stick and assume that they're used to it, that it doesn't bother them. It's just one more let down, right?
One year a person (room mom) who I ultimately trusted to bring a safe treat for DS because she is FA herself and ended up getting it initially balked at my saying that we need to be able to bring treats anytime treats are brought--this would be at two classroom parties each year (birthday cupcakes are only served in the cafeteria during lunch). She said that it wouldn't be fair to the other mothers.
First of all, I wasn't suggesting that we be the only ones to bake snacks--just that we always were able to do so. I wanted DS to be eating the same thing that other kids were.
Second of all, I don't know why other mothers wouldn't be hugging me since I'm taking away some baking burdens.
Third of all, and I responded with this, "It's not fair for my son to always be the odd one out wrt food and it's certainly not fair for him to have an allergic reaction because it is treat day."
I'm rambling now, I know.
I am with you on the exclusion thing. Always having your own treat is excluding. I think I've accepted that it is just a part of this thing, though. So I appreciate your post and making me question that.
But I don't know that a teacher is going to care about exclusion to that extent. And if a teacher isn't already moved by this allergy, seeing my child go without won't move them (it happened this year and no one batted an eye).
But I'll be very interested to be proved wrong. You'll keep us posted about this, won't you?

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 12:29pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]
And I'm not going to say that this happened because I'm Canadian.
[/b]
I am. It's what I was thinking while reading your post--before getting to this sentence. You Canadians live different lives than we do down here (for the most part). And you're very lucky. I can't say I haven't thought about moving your way before. But brrrrrrrrr. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 12:43pm
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b][b]They speak of discrimination occurring only when a substitution is not offered. The whole school is not required to be offered the same lunch. This might viewed as being legally acceptable for the classroom as well.[/b]
You know though, this could be an interesting legal point. I'm going to have to go back through the booklet that goes with the USDA form for meal accommodations to review the language.
Point is, if the school spends enough time to find a safe substitution at other times, why not just dispense the safe substitution for all?
This is an interesting avenue because in the lunch example (USDA) the SCHOOL is required to provide the substitution. They couldn't possibly provide a substitution cupcake for MFA children without it being certified as: MFA-free. Have they ever seen the price of cupcakes from Divvies [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]? We (PARENTS) are the ones providing the substitutions---and yes, I know we are not talking about LUNCH, but if the SCHOOL is sanctioning this activity of cupcakes galore during class hours (not us parents---I would definitely prefer a non-food celebration room & my guess is most of us here prefer that), then the SCHOOL should be obligated to provide the alternative.
I do not allow DD to eat any food at school other than what I provide. However, if the school was obligated to provide, let's say Divvies, then I would just double-check that it was Divvies, and let her have it. Instead, I am either baking from scratch, freezing, thawing, frosting, packing, etc...or ordering from treats that are egg-free, peanut-free, and tree nut-free. It is quite an expense...
Just a thought.
Now, I have more to post about DD and her exclusions in school this past year...I'll start another

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 12:49pm
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Quote:Originally posted by McCobbre:
[b]
Second of all, I don't know why other mothers wouldn't be hugging me since I'm taking away some baking burdens.
[/b]
Because they think they are earning gold stars, angel wings, brownie points...whatever..to bring in some fabulous looking baked good. These are the Cupcake Queens.
I guess it is a foreign concept to those of us who HAVE to bake for our child's safety. It gets a bit routine [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
I did teach myself how to decorate cakes, cupcakes, cookies quite well...love when I am asked where I bought DD's birthday cake at her home parties. Not school---oh, please. Her bday is in the summer, but they can't let that pass---they said all summer birthday would celebrate their 1/2 birthdays. The teacher's idea of "half" was at her 7 month mark--not 6 month--hubby and I had a chuckle.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 1:09pm
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In regards to DD being left out with the aid's celebration of her own ADULT birthday--this wasn't another parent; it was the school staff. I did speak to the teacher about it and she apologized FOR THE AID. No responsibility on her part--the one who's signature was on the 504. And I was given the robotic response of "Your daughter appeared fine".
Yes, she appears better than fine. I'll even say she has more self-control than most of her peers. I am always amazed at how she conducts herself---but actually sacrifices herself. I wish she was the type of kid who would throw a tantrum, yell, cry..react in some way to let the adults have it thrown in their faces that they all stupidly overlooked how hurt 2 children's feelings were (she and another child with food allergies who didn't even tell the parent)--trust me, our kids learn to not rock the boat, not draw attention to themselves, particularly in regard to food issues.
These people DO NOT CARE or DO NOT BELIEVE there is emotional damage by what they do or not do for our children. It isn't exclusive to peanut allergies. Pick any disability and go to a similar support board and the same discussions are happening over there.
I am thoroughly disgusted with the behavior shown by staff at my DD's school last year. We have a new principal, new teacher, and a new nurse. I hope for better. I expect better. I will demand better. My mind set is a lot like yours gvmom. We tried our best to not argue every violation last year--let some things go. Not this year.
Perhaps we can get a group rate with our tshirts (Mouser, gvmom, and me).
GOOD WISHES & LUCK FOR ALL OF US FOR A BETTER SCHOOL YEAR!
[This message has been edited by PinkPoodle (edited August 13, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 1:32pm
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Speaking of singing songs, gvmom, was it your kiddo who had to sing the hymn "Now Thank We All Our God?" or was it "Come Ye Thankful People Come" at school at Thanksgiving?
Teaching history to some, religious exclusion to others. Yes--it happens.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 2:22pm
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[b]gvmom, was it your kiddo who had to sing the hymn[/b]
It was "We Gather Together". And yet another cause to be looked at like a 6-eyed monster when I asked about more information about this hymn. You know, cause my son was supposed to be singing something religious in a public school. Freak that I am, interested in the actual curriculum and if they are breaching a church/state thing.
[b]I hope for better. I expect better. I will demand better. My mind set is a lot like yours gvmom. We tried our best to not argue every violation last year--let some things go. Not this year.[/b]
I hope things go better for you too.
I think we all should expect better.
AND
I think we all should demand better.
We documented every violation, with a smile, and with understanding. Make sure you do too.
This year, I'm done being nice though. I am frayed. I am tired. And I'm done with this rolling over and being a quiet, don't make waves, thing.
We have reached a line. We have certain things that we are waiting on. School is two weeks away too.
This is the time that PETA or ActUp should recruit me......*raising arm in defiance* *letting out a barbaric "yeah"*
[b]These people DO NOT CARE or DO NOT BELIEVE there is emotional damage by what they do or not do for our children. It isn't exclusive to peanut allergies. Pick any disability and go to a similar support board and the same discussions are happening over there.[/b]
And I almost say, let it be at their peril. If they don't care, make them... if only to save their jobs. Whoever it is. To ignore the rights of those with disabilities is obnoxious, and those that do so shouldn't find themselves in fields that deal with children at the very least. The right to accommodations is protected by the federal government. Letting schools get the best of us because we let them get away with it shouldn't be acceptable to any of us anymore.
And really, there is a line that I draw as far as how far we would take things with the school..... the cost to our children that we don't think makes it worth it... but I'll tell you, we aren't going down without a bit of a fight.
[b]Because they think they are earning gold stars, angel wings, brownie points...whatever..to bring in some fabulous looking baked good. These are the Cupcake Queens.[/b]
Loved this btw. *snicker* *snicker*
Oh, and also, I do realize I'm working backwards through some posts. Sorry. I'm crazed right now.
[b]With regard to the teachers having to care (I think that's basically what you are hoping for, right--because if they actively try to include it means they must care for our children, right?)--I don't know that this can be fostered in this way.[/b]
What I'm hoping for is that first I can appeal to their humanity. Appeal to the fact that they would say that they would care. Next, if that failed, I would appeal to their sense of not being revealed as a hypocrite along with a violation write-up. Last, I would write a violation write up, followed possibly by the notification of my intent to file an OCR complaint. Finally, filing a complaint. (this of course presupposes that an OCR complaint hasn't been filed yet)
[b]I think folks are used to seeing FA kids getting the short end of the stick and assume that they're used to it, that it doesn't bother them. It's just one more let down, right?[/b]
I don't think people are used to seeing it. I think they are used to seeing parents making it okay. They are used to seeing parents gloss over the fact that their child is being left out. They are used to hearing, "oh, well, that's okay... we'll just have this safe little thing over here... no worries.." as we turn away, smile disappearing off our faces, stomach turning, and sinking feeling in our hearts. That is what they are used to.
Maybe they should hear, "Can I see the list of ingredients and allergen warnings please?" "I'm sure you didn't purposely set out to exclude my child.... did you receive that notice that we sent home to the parents about his FA's? I know it had all of our contact information on it so people could ask us questions." "Oh, well, I'm sorry you'll have to take these cupcakes home after you went to all that trouble, maybe next time you can call me and I'll give you some ideas for safe things that the entire class can eat... including my child." "BTW, did your child like the goody bag I sent for my son's birthday? The kids didn't even miss the food they had so much fun with that stuff." "TA-TA Muffy, Biffy, Taffy, and HEATHER".
Okay, okay... fantasy. But it could happen! And remember, eventually Winona does get the red bow!
[b]But I don't know that a teacher is going to care about exclusion to that extent. And if a teacher isn't already moved by this allergy, seeing my child go without won't move them (it happened this year and no one batted an eye).
But I'll be very interested to be proved wrong. You'll keep us posted about this, won't you?[/b]
I can try though. They might not care from their heart. But how many OCR complaints do they want? Do they want an examination of their implementation of "Standard of Care" laws..... if I ever figure out what body deals with that?
If the USDA has reign over food dispensed in the school.....if I ever figure anything out on that end.... do they want a complaint being investigated by the USDA?
And, really, I'm not big on proving people wrong.... you know, like I have some thing I want to prove to people.... but in this instance I do hope that I can prove you wrong in the sense that we end up having some better results this year, even including using my proposed idea as part of it all.
Hopefully, you won't have to encounter such stuff as all this in your new place!

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 3:21pm
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Last year when we were getting DD IEP I started reading about the psychological aspect of PA. Basically, we were freaked! It is hard enough to raise a daughter (or son)to be self confident, feel like they 'fit in,' be a leader, and all the other personality traits that makes them feel on top of the world. Add to that struggle a built in identifier to 'keep your child safe' that puts them at seperate tables, gives them seperate treats, makes them the reason the class can't go on certain field trips, make certain crafts...... and we wonder why our kids have food anxiety? are hesitant to make new friends? Hate new situations?... I just don't understand why it is O.K. to openly discriminate against our kids.
When the psychologist did our evaluation he saw the potential for a bright, carefree, social child to develop psychological issues from other people's reaction to her PA. He specificaly listed 'seperate tables and other acts that singled out' our daughter as detrimental to her long term mental health. When I read it I wanted to say "duh," but I understood that it needed to be put in because of things I had read on PA.com. Sometimes I think administrators just don't think. They see an easy answer and don't look at what they are doing to an individual child for what? Do they forget it is just Peanuts? Add to that Cupcake Queens who choose to not get the 'life or death' part of our situation but want to 'show off' their momminess...... and our kids are sunk if the school chooses not to uphold their 504 or IEP.
I agree that we should-as it is safe- give our children every chance to feel like any other kid at school.
Sorry for the rant. I just wish people could see how NORMAL life without peanuts can be.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 3:39pm
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]I can try though. They might not care from their heart. But how many OCR complaints do they want? Do they want an examination of their implementation of "Standard of Care" laws..... if I ever figure out what body deals with that?
[/b]
okay, so don't hold me to this, it's just off the cuff and not really official. It's just an impression.
Standard of Care is generally a term applied in the healthcare field. And let me tell you, most of the time, there's no one specific absolute way to handle each instance. It revolves more around what another similiarly trained, prepared, reasonable, and prudent professional would do in the same situation and a combination of supportable options to form a path. It's where the educational background and experience comes in.
There's not always *only* one course of action, one just better be able to justify their actions with documentable support. [i]Evidence Based[/i]. People are individuals and of course, sometimes, medical history figures into determining the *best* course of action. Sometimes, there are not a lot of choices, and the ones there are aren't too thrilling, either.
A standard of care is generally arrived at through the collaberation of many diciplines. They are not always something you will find in a book chained to the entrance of an institution entitled: "Our Standards of Care." (Although you might find "Standard Operating Procedures" somewhere in the administrative offices---or "Policy and Procedures" in certain institutions.)
[url="http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/downloads/pdf/publications/fa-197.pdf"]http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/downloads/pdf/publications/fa-197.pdf[/url]
This 2004 article mentions "intensive glucose managment" as becomming the "standard of care" in the icu. Well, guess what? It has. For a while now. And as the article indicated, a [i]protocol[/i] was developed. To *me* many times, a Standard of Care is best described as something that involves lots of little subplots, policies, protocols, SOP's and evidence based practice to create effective [i]management[/i]. But sure, you just might find some smaller bits of the big picture in black and white. I'm just saying that *to me* it's always not black and white. It's maybe what another prudent, similiarly trained, possibly licensed, and reasonable individual would do. In that situation.
But standard of care---Google had a good definition (IMHO):
[url="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=define%3A++standard+of+care"]http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=define%3A++standard+of+care[/url]
check out the last one.
anywhoooo. some are referenceable directly, like *our* Unit Standards. (might be different elsewhere) ie: turn and reposition at least every 2 hours and documented, vital signs every one hour and documented, open heart patients a one to one for the first twenty four hours or until extubated, iv sites checked every hour and documented, etc...
Here, the curse of [i]guidelines[/i] (remember the "wellness policy guidelines"??):
[url="http://www.guideline.gov/summary/summary.aspx?ss=15&doc_id=4915&nbr=3512"]http://www.guideline.gov/summary/summary.aspx?ss=15&doc_id=4915&nbr=3512[/url]
[url="http://www.thoracic.org/sections/clinical-information/critical-care/evidence-based-critical-care/scientific-statements-and-practice-guidelines.html"]http://www.thoracic.org/sec tions/clinic...guidelines.html[/url]
so....sometimes, I don't *think* it's always something [i]tangible[/i]. Until an expert witness is invited to the party. Or several. The more in agreement....
But [i]guidelines[/i]. Remember that Mass. Document? It meant something to me. It's not often in the field of education I see something that [i]concrete[/i]. Well, at least not I'm like to seeing in my profession.
So. Professional Organizations. Governing Bodies. Licensing Bodies. [i]Guidelines[/i]. Professional Journals. What another reasonable, prudent, similiarly prepared (and licensed?) person would do. Or a whole bunch of them probably is a lot stronger statement when they agree, than not. It can get pretty messy....
Or, sometimes, it's straight to the point. Finito. Mano-a-Mano.
ps....maybe that "guidelines" clearing house might be something of interest. I don't know.
ie:
[url="http://www.guideline.gov/search/searchresults.aspx?Type=3&txtSearch=school+allergy+management&num=20"]http://www.guideline.gov/search/searchre...nagement&num=20[/url]
You know it's not advice, I still can't pinpoint a lot of this stuff all in one place, in black and white myself, but hey, after fifteen years, I still feel a confidence when I walk into work, and the links may not be accurate or current still.
[This message has been edited by The #l Mouser! (edited August 13, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 4:32pm
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I smell a bear.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 4:40pm
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I'm supposed to be upstairs watching a movie, waiting for the Perseid Meteor shower, but I snuck away.
A little cheese perhaps for you Mouser. Thought you might like something to sink your teeth into. Like you, don't hold me to the following links, they too are just off the cuff and are what have helped add fuel to my musings:
[url="http://www.ocde.us/downloads/legal/LiabilityForNeglSept2001.pdf"]http://www.ocde.us/downloads/legal/LiabilityForNeglSept2001.pdf[/url]
[url="http://www.educationlawconsortium.org/forum/2005/papers/daneu.pdf"]http://www.educationlawconsortium.org/forum/2005/papers/daneu.pdf[/url]
There is another pdf that I saved a copy of but now can't get the website.
See where those take you for now........

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 4:43pm
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[b]I smell a bear.[/b]
Yes, it's managed to squeeze itself into a smaller skin and grow a longer tail. Less obtrusive than it's caucasian maligning counterpart that was also an alter ego.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 5:58pm
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Quote:Originally posted by lilpig:
[b][b]I smell a bear.[/b]
Gvmom's reply:
Yes, it's managed to squeeze itself into a smaller skin and grow a longer tail. Less obtrusive than it's caucasian maligning counterpart that was also an alter ego. [/b]
ROFL [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] Don't know if it's because I'm totally punchy right now, or that was the funniest thing I've read on here for a while...
You've got me thinking gvmom (which is dangerous btw) I'm going to read through the various links, think more, and comment more later.
I will say this though -- and not happily. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] My ds could be a case study for the psychological aspects of FAs. While he is frequently a very happy little boy, he's always bringing up food discussions with others, always looking to compare what people are eating, and is now able to express to me how much he hates his allergies. While I'm glad he can confide his feelings, I'm miserable that's how he feels.
I don't know if his feelings are somewhat tied to being allergic to the fabulous trifecto of milk, eggs, and peanuts, or he would feel this way no matter what.
He's definitely one of those kids who wants to fit in, with clothes, sports teams, friends, you name it.
While I fully believe some kids can accept their "differentness" wrt to FA, I [b] know [/b] there are some who struggle. I've been trying to preach the whole "everyone is different" thing and he could care less. I'm very afraid for my ds starting Kindergarten for so many reasons, his feeling excluded is definitely one of them [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] Meg

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 10:27pm
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b][b]I smell a bear.[/b]
Yes, it's managed to squeeze itself into a smaller skin and grow a longer tail. Less obtrusive than it's caucasian maligning counterpart that was also an alter ego. [/b]
I gave you more than the fifteen minutes (never even got my cup o'joe) you gave me, and I will indulge you further. I think I've been quite hospitable, tho you never even told me what you thought of my shirt. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
I got up early just for you. It's the first thing I came to. There's a good chance I might regret it, given the tone I'm reading. Band lessons today, appointments, back to school shopping, a little time in the pool. Ant remediation.
this link:
[url="http://www.ocde.us/downloads/legal/LiabilityForNeglSept2001.pdf"]http://www.ocde.us/downloads/legal/LiabilityForNeglSept2001.pdf[/url]
the bolded ideals within. sounds like they come from somewhere, yes? Noteably, the court cases cited don't instill great confidence in thinking a school would be obligated to assume the same duty of care as *I* would regarding my children, (considering my background, and my experience with their specific needs) but rather, that of the general public conglomerate, although some looked more on the promising side than others. I could be wrong on all counts) Remember who the author of the document is. Keep it in mind.
Anywhooo. Those items that give the ring of a Standard of Care. The [i]Ideal[/i]. By themselves, pretty open ended. Up for interpretation. I guess what were looking for is a document(s) defining the scope of each one, not just court cases, right?
For instance, in healthcare, there is a Standard of Care (although some might term it a "Policy") that relate to the expectation of Privacy.
[url="http://www.hhs.gov/news/facts/privacy.html"]http://www.hhs.gov/news/facts/privacy.html[/url]
To me, in so many words, the link describes more the general scope, than defining the standard itself, and general expectations as well as mentioning the actual law these expectations should stem from. The driving force behind the standard. And as I would expect the idea of Monitorability and Enforcement methods for Achieving this Standard of Care (the Law, encouraged by research, journals, professional organizations, governing bodies, etc...) are mentioned as well. It's the law that creates the actual defacto limitations, which, still, are probably open for interpretation.
I'm just not counting on the educational system to have that kind impetus. If I'm wrong, I'd be thrilled. It takes a certain level of.........compulsion, interest, regard.
First off, one need be able (or want) to get up early due to it. School hours. As if. Not a soul in my child's school building until fifteen minutes before the doors open.
I've quit asking that my two oldest children, both with IEP's meet their *primary* teachers prior to the start of school. You'd think I'd had asked for their first born. (Or their bagel and java chip lite.) It's just not [i]do-able[/i]. (yeah, that was sarcasm)
I don't know if there is a school nurse hired yet, I don't know if they found an aide, I don't know if there is even *the* classroom I was promised. That was agreed upon in the IEP. What do I know?
I know I'll manage. If that's how they want to run things, I can play ball. Whatever, you're sick of my rambling. I *do* tend to talk about myself, or situations surrounding me, particularly when drawing parallels, but hey, it's not like I have much else to draw on. I'm not a social butterfly, and my experiences in that arena, *are* pretty limited. Always have been. I've never been good at uncomfortable silences and neither are my children. It's almost like we *have* to have *something* to talk about. To hang on to.
Back to Patient Privacy example as a Standard of Care.
The Expectation.
Don't forget, it's not just something they put in writing and therefore became. In order to implement this standard, there have been numerous changes, based on definable characteristics.
Particularly in the way we gather, document, store, retrieve, and disseminate information. It didn't happen overnight, and it's a animal continually in progress.
Quality Improvement.
I used to be able to use as many pages of nursing documentation notes to describe something. Now, it's electronic. It's limited to a series of check boxes and pre determined descriptors. There is a little "annotative" box but it's limited to so many characters. (It's quite a relief actually, but I'll tell you, there's always a trade off with such things. I always felt there was a greater impetus on behalf of the patient when charting was more [i]freestyle[/i]. Less inhibited.
I could squeeze a lot into those pages, and if I [i]needed[/i] more blanks, there was always the xerox. And yes, the system does appear to provide the institution [i]as well[/i] with a greater degree of protection. It's a bit on the dummy proof side. Which isn't always a bad thing either, since it does afford a checklist of sorts. But I wouldn't exchange having skilled employees for those who need dummy proofing. KWIM? You know what they say about things getting lost in translation. Sometimes, the descriptor I need isn't there, and I'm forced to check a little white box that really isn't as accurate (or call down to "Information Systems" and ask why.
Anyways.
Wouldn't it be great if there was something like the link I posted for Privacy, for Food Allergies in schools? Who knows, maybe there is.
The link may not be accurate, applicable, current, etc... It's just a way to demonstrate an idea.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 10:32pm
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If I willingly send my child into a situation that I, the *expert* in caring for my child, deem unsafe, am not satisfied with, have been "vocal" against, how does that define "Duty of Care"?

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 10:37pm
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Oh, and I'm not saying that Standards of Care are limited to the healthcare field, just that they appear to be more evident and more utilized there. I'm not saying that as fact, just how it appears. It's stuff we toss around every day. It's part of our language. It's part of our identity.
Thanks for breakfast.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 10:53pm
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]that was also an alter ego. [/b]
Originally? Where I got the idea?
It's my nickname at work.
(apologies for serial posting, but I don't really like to edit at this point...)

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 12:26am
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Quote:Originally posted by mommyofmatt:
[b] ROFL [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] Don't know if it's because I'm totally punchy right now, or that was the funniest thing I've read on here for a while...
[/b]
Yes, I am quoting myself. The #1 Mouser (any chance we could shorten this to mouser?), I interpreted the tone as good natured teasing, that's why I was laughing...Meg

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 12:51am
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McCobbre, you really do think it has to do with being Canadian?
We didn't have the written school plan until Grade One, but the "peanut free" letters went home from JK on.
Why was it do-able?
I'm not saying that I shouldn't have been a fly on the wall of the classroom sometimes when a parent was told they either had to take things home or divvy (?) them up to be taken home after the school day had ended. I'm not saying the Cupcake Queens went away with smiles on their faces, but they did go away.
I remember posting here about one Hallowe'en party that I was disappointed in - lack of homemade goods - under Living with PA - and it was pointed out to me that I was, in fact, lucky. I could read ingredients (or the teacher could or my son could).
I am unclear as to when the whole homemade anything eating by either of my children became something that I thought was not necessary - also due to what I had read on this board.
I didn't use the word do-able to offend anyone. It was the best word I could think of using (I know it's not a word) to say what I wanted to say when my thoughts are coming out disjointed; not all at once with regard to what I feel I have to say; and when I'm dealing with the vibes I'm dealing with in my own household.
Anyone else who has posted - if you have read my posts in particular - do you feel it is because I'm Canadian? Because if it is general consensus then it doesn't matter one wit how I was able to make it do-able, if it's a Canadian thing when gvmom is in America.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
There but for the Grace of God, go I.

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 12:54am
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Quote:Originally posted by McCobbre:
[b]
You Canadians live different lives than we do down here (for the most part). And you're very lucky. [/b]
May I second that?
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
~Elizabeth

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 1:13am
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Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]
Anyone else who has posted - if you have read my posts in particular - do you feel it is because I'm Canadian? Because if it is general consensus then it doesn't matter one wit how I was able to make it do-able, if it's a Canadian thing when gvmom is in America.
[/b]
Just my point of view on this (no expert on Canada), but just off the top of my head --
>Canada seems to have better labeling laws, which sure helps in dealing with FA
>Canadians seem to be -- on the whole -- less "all about ME" as is the stereotype (rightly deserved, IMHO) of Americans
>Canadians often have a "live and let live" or, perhaps, more tolerant nature toward those with differences, be they religious, ethnic, health, etc. (Or, perhaps, the discrimination, when it occurs, is far less publicized than it is in the USA.)
But, just because you have the pluses (as viewed by me) you may in Canada, this does NOT mean that how you managed to get the food-free classrooms is not VERY applicable here -- clearly [i] you played a big part [/i] it why it was do-able. So, please continue to share anything you can in that vein here.
We can all learn from each other, regardless of what side of the border or ocean we are on. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
~Eliz
Edited so it better means what I'm trying to say.
[This message has been edited by ajas_folks (edited August 13, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 1:39am
ajas_folks's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]
I obviously had the teacher's co-operation, and more importantly, the principal's.
[/b]
Re-read all your posts in this thread, and this is the single sentence that stands out for me.
In Texas (grade K & 1) the principal was clearly NOT going to work with us at all -- even said exactly that in first phone conference with me. Her attitude was the single-most important driving factor as to why we homeschooled there & did not put son into school.
In Georgia (grade 2 & now 3) the public school's only solution (per the District Superintendent) was to send our son miles away to a school for which we were not zoned, which had the worst academic performance and records and reputation for the entire area. It was the ONLY school where they would put 504 into place which included full-time nurse. (Teachers in this state are not required to administer meds -- and many refuse out of liability, so nobody would have been onsite to give EpiPen at any other school.) We put our children into private school, at least 2 other new-PA kids there -- and it has worked (with bumps & some real mistakes plus a few other parents really peeved, but no reactions) so far ONLY because the teachers were highly co-operative and in-the-know and "take charge" (meaning no parents buffaloed them).
[i]
I suspect that how you approached the principal, combined with possibly the principal's naturally receptive nature was instrumental in getting his/her support.[/i]
More and more, in the USA in general, the principal is under such pressure no meet the NCLB (No Child LEft Behind) benchmarks and to "bring up" their school's test scores that they could give a mouse's behind when it comes to dealing with special needs situations. There is also an "executive privilege" (negative) mentality growing among many school administrators & principals in our country. A "Don't _____ with Me" mentality as to his/her domain, if you will. It is sickening, because many of them have lost sight of the fact that this is supposed to be
all
about
the
CHILDREN.
~Elizabeth, needing coffee
[This message has been edited by ajas_folks (edited August 13, 2007).]

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