How To Not Worry....

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 3:42am
Maple Leaf's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/10/2006 - 09:00

Hi There [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

For those of you who have kids in school, how on earth do you get through your day without worrying yourself to death???

I am sending my DD to preschool this year and have the normal parent worries and then there is all of the allergy worries. DD is PA, MA and EA.

So how do you do it?

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 4:19am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

Hi there.
It gets easier.
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 4:33am
Maple Leaf's picture
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Joined: 02/10/2006 - 09:00

Thank you [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 4:38am
Christabelle's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/03/2004 - 09:00

If anyone knows the answer, let me know.
My first born child, who is my PA child, starts first grade in exactly one week.
They serve PB&J on the menu daily.
I am freaking out.

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 4:55am
Going Nuts's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

My son is entering 7th grade. Like Jason said, it really does get easier.
When they're young it's so hard, even if you are confident in their school environment. As they get older new challenges arise, but for me at least, the school part has become much less anxiety provoking.
Best of luck!
Amy

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 7:28am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I was lucky enough that our principle took PB&J off the school menu when I put my two children in this school. I had homeschooled my oldest PA until 2nd grade because of the fear, but when my second TNA child was ready for kindergarten I found this school. We were zoned for this elementary school anyway, and I went and talked with the principle and she was so understanding and willing to learn. (A lot of the educators are because of legal issues) Anyway, my oldest started 5th grade this year and my second child started 3rd and they are very protected. There also happens to be 3 other children with PA at this school as well. They thank me all the time for trailblazing the way with the allergies, but I have had an amazing experience with educating everyone. I could not be any more fortunate, I hope that maybe you can convince your school to do the same. I would be glad to help in anyway that you need.
------------------
Stacie

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 8:25am
Nutternomore's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/02/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by jtolpin:
[b]Hi there.
It gets easier.
Jason
[/b]
Maple Leaf,
It really does get easier. You may find it beneficial to read "Caring for Your Child With Severe Food Allergies" by Lisa Cipriano Collins. This book does a good job of dealing with the emotions surrounding management of this condition. A key takeway concept involves the neverending balance between "safety" and "social normalcy".
[url="http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/047134785X/ref=sib_dp_pt/103-7249396-3697461#reader-link"]http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/047134785X/ref=sib_dp_pt/103-7249396-3697461#reader-link[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 11:15am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

My post would be the same as Going Nuts'. My son is entering sixth grade this year. At the beginning of the year, not quite sure how long it lasts, I still wait for "the call" and it probably pops into my head off and on through the year, but it is a bit easier.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I would walk up to heaven and bring you back home with me.

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 12:34pm
joeybeth's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/01/2006 - 09:00

ditto what everyone else said about it getting easier over time. if you can get your school to take the pb&j off the menu (and even better, all peanut products), it will help you immensely.
our school finally took peanut products off the menu two years ago including the daily pb&j sandwiches they gave to children who were behind in lunch payments (now they get sunbutter sandwiches or cheese sandwiches only).
even though other students can still bring pb and peanut products in their lunchboxes, now my two PA girls can at least eat safely from the hot lunch trays AND can find a safe spot to sit away from all the lunchboxes. (in our school, my girls are allowed to sit on the side of the cafeteria that all the lunchtray kids are on even IF my girls bring their lunch that day. in this way, my girls are never near the pb&j sandwiches and other peanut items. it's not perfect but it's a huge cafeteria and they are quite far away from the lunchboxes. it sure helps me get through the day without so many concerns).
if you can have a discussion with your school about at least making the cafeteria's kitchen a safe haven, it would be a good start. of course, i'd be all for no peanuts period but that's not something i'll push for anytime soon since they've been so accommodating and since the girls are problem free so far. this could change if we began to experience problems/reactions in the cafeteria, of course.
another thought....one of my PA girls has been in school since kindergarten and is now in the 5th grade (first day of school TODAY). you would be surprised (at least in my experience) how many kids don't want to bring pb&j as they get older. it must have a connotation of being a "little kids' food" or something because we honestly don't see it nearly as much now that she's in intermediate. i guess it could be that we just have fantastic students and parents that show a lot of concern and don't bring pb, but i think it has more to do with it not being nearly as popular as they get older. whatever the reason, YEAH!!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
good luck.....you'll make it. i did and i was a total MESS at first. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 4:19am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

Hi there.
It gets easier.
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 4:33am
Maple Leaf's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/10/2006 - 09:00

Thank you [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 4:38am
Christabelle's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/03/2004 - 09:00

If anyone knows the answer, let me know.
My first born child, who is my PA child, starts first grade in exactly one week.
They serve PB&J on the menu daily.
I am freaking out.

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 4:55am
Going Nuts's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

My son is entering 7th grade. Like Jason said, it really does get easier.
When they're young it's so hard, even if you are confident in their school environment. As they get older new challenges arise, but for me at least, the school part has become much less anxiety provoking.
Best of luck!
Amy

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 7:28am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I was lucky enough that our principle took PB&J off the school menu when I put my two children in this school. I had homeschooled my oldest PA until 2nd grade because of the fear, but when my second TNA child was ready for kindergarten I found this school. We were zoned for this elementary school anyway, and I went and talked with the principle and she was so understanding and willing to learn. (A lot of the educators are because of legal issues) Anyway, my oldest started 5th grade this year and my second child started 3rd and they are very protected. There also happens to be 3 other children with PA at this school as well. They thank me all the time for trailblazing the way with the allergies, but I have had an amazing experience with educating everyone. I could not be any more fortunate, I hope that maybe you can convince your school to do the same. I would be glad to help in anyway that you need.
------------------
Stacie

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 8:25am
Nutternomore's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/02/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by jtolpin:
[b]Hi there.
It gets easier.
Jason
[/b]
Maple Leaf,
It really does get easier. You may find it beneficial to read "Caring for Your Child With Severe Food Allergies" by Lisa Cipriano Collins. This book does a good job of dealing with the emotions surrounding management of this condition. A key takeway concept involves the neverending balance between "safety" and "social normalcy".
[url="http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/047134785X/ref=sib_dp_pt/103-7249396-3697461#reader-link"]http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/047134785X/ref=sib_dp_pt/103-7249396-3697461#reader-link[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 11:15am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

My post would be the same as Going Nuts'. My son is entering sixth grade this year. At the beginning of the year, not quite sure how long it lasts, I still wait for "the call" and it probably pops into my head off and on through the year, but it is a bit easier.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I would walk up to heaven and bring you back home with me.

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 12:34pm
joeybeth's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/01/2006 - 09:00

ditto what everyone else said about it getting easier over time. if you can get your school to take the pb&j off the menu (and even better, all peanut products), it will help you immensely.
our school finally took peanut products off the menu two years ago including the daily pb&j sandwiches they gave to children who were behind in lunch payments (now they get sunbutter sandwiches or cheese sandwiches only).
even though other students can still bring pb and peanut products in their lunchboxes, now my two PA girls can at least eat safely from the hot lunch trays AND can find a safe spot to sit away from all the lunchboxes. (in our school, my girls are allowed to sit on the side of the cafeteria that all the lunchtray kids are on even IF my girls bring their lunch that day. in this way, my girls are never near the pb&j sandwiches and other peanut items. it's not perfect but it's a huge cafeteria and they are quite far away from the lunchboxes. it sure helps me get through the day without so many concerns).
if you can have a discussion with your school about at least making the cafeteria's kitchen a safe haven, it would be a good start. of course, i'd be all for no peanuts period but that's not something i'll push for anytime soon since they've been so accommodating and since the girls are problem free so far. this could change if we began to experience problems/reactions in the cafeteria, of course.
another thought....one of my PA girls has been in school since kindergarten and is now in the 5th grade (first day of school TODAY). you would be surprised (at least in my experience) how many kids don't want to bring pb&j as they get older. it must have a connotation of being a "little kids' food" or something because we honestly don't see it nearly as much now that she's in intermediate. i guess it could be that we just have fantastic students and parents that show a lot of concern and don't bring pb, but i think it has more to do with it not being nearly as popular as they get older. whatever the reason, YEAH!!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
good luck.....you'll make it. i did and i was a total MESS at first. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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