how often to retest

Posted on: Mon, 10/07/2002 - 10:56am
momofjen's picture
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Hi everyone. I am not new to reading, but I am new to posting a question. My daughter is 5 years old and tested positive for PA, TNA, Sesame, and eggs when she was 12 months old. Her first and only reaction was a few hives on her face after eating a small piece of a peanut butter cookie at 12 months of age.Her skins tests at that age were positive for all of the above. At 3 and a half she had a Cap Rast for peanuts and was a 5. This is how we handle her allergy. All labels are read carefully. She never has amay contain product. She has never had store bought chocolate other than VNF. She has never has store bought baked goods, never shares her food. Up until last week when I read that many of you give your kids Ben and Jerry's, she had never had icecream. ( She had her first icecream , other tha my homemade and smiled for 3 days!!! ) We don't however call all kinds of companies. We eat in restuarants and trust that they are telling us what things are cooked in or around.Now you can understand our comfort level. My question is this. Since she has never reacted, do you think she should be retested periodically? Do you think that she is probably not touch or smell sensitive? How can it be that she has never come near anyone who has peanuts on their breath or peanut particles left on a grocery store cart? Maybe, I am just wishing this were the case. Has anyone ever heard of someone growing out of the allergy? I know someone who swears that her son outgrew it.Thanks in advance fo your imput.

Posted on: Mon, 10/07/2002 - 12:20pm
Chicago's picture
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Joined: 04/21/2001 - 09:00

Welcome!
There is a thread on this topic on the "Living with PA" board. It is on the top now, so you should be able to find it.
It will show you there are lots of different "answers" to your question. You'll get more info, but will still need to develop your plan - what is best for your child.

Posted on: Mon, 10/07/2002 - 12:59pm
momofjen's picture
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Joined: 10/07/2002 - 09:00

THANKS!!

Posted on: Tue, 10/08/2002 - 1:48pm
Melrose Mum's picture
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Joined: 01/23/2002 - 09:00

I just saw Dr. Michael Young speak tonight and he is all for the CAP RAST (aka Immno CAP) test, if a child will outgrow the allergy (about 20% do) the CAP RAST is a good way to chart progress. He personally does a test once a year until age 6 (chances to 'resolve' drop quite a bit after age six) then again at puberty. (the hormonal change can affect allergies either way) hope that helps, Diane

Posted on: Thu, 10/10/2002 - 2:20am
DebbieK's picture
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Joined: 03/05/2000 - 09:00

Dr. B. Zimmerman in Toronto has done some studies & has found that there is a certain sub-population of peanut allergic kids who are in hindsight more likely to outgrow their PA. (no asthma, eczema or other allergies). He has a great website which explains it all.
Debbie

Posted on: Thu, 10/10/2002 - 2:52am
momofjen's picture
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Joined: 10/07/2002 - 09:00

What is the website? I would like to read up on it. My daughter has TNA as well as sesame , but no signs of exzema or asthma.

Posted on: Thu, 10/10/2002 - 5:16am
Wolfmeis's picture
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Joined: 12/31/2001 - 09:00

Here is the link:
[url="http://www.drbarryzimmerman.com/foods/peanut_outgrow.htm"]http://www.drbarryzimmerman.com/foods/peanut_outgrow.htm[/url]
------------------
Lory
PA dd Graham
[url="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ChsFFAS/"]Charleston Family Food Allergy Support[/url]

Posted on: Fri, 10/11/2002 - 2:45am
BENSMOM's picture
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Joined: 05/20/2000 - 09:00

momofjen, it's possible your daughter has outgrown or will outgrow the allergy. But whether or not that is the case, it is likely she is not touch or smell sensitive. Despite what you read on these boards, most pa people are not touch or smell sensitive. It seems that way here because it is people with the more severely allergic and reactive children that need the support the most. Life is much more complicated when you have to deal with touch and smell sensitivity. My son for example, is not touch or smell sensitive and does not eat at a peanut-free table at school. If there's ever a problem, we'll change that. I can't remember where I read this, but I think the pa people that are touch and smell sensitive are the minority.

Posted on: Fri, 10/11/2002 - 2:51am
BENSMOM's picture
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Joined: 05/20/2000 - 09:00

momofjen, it's possible your daughter has outgrown or will outgrow the allergy. But whether or not that is the case, it is likely she is not touch or smell sensitive. Despite what you read on these boards, most pa people are not touch or smell sensitive. It seems that way here because it is people with the more severely allergic and reactive children that need the support the most. Life is much more complicated when you have to deal with touch and smell sensitivity. My son for example, is not touch or smell sensitive and does not eat at a peanut-free table at school. If there's ever a problem, we'll change that. I can't remember where I read this, but I think the pa people that are touch and smell sensitive are the minority.

Posted on: Fri, 10/11/2002 - 3:12am
Caterina2's picture
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Joined: 02/14/2001 - 09:00

My daughter also had a cap rast test and scored a 5. She also has never had a reaction to smell or touch, however, the allergist said that because of her high score, she is probably smell and touch sensitive. I too thought the same as you about possible exposures by being near someone with peanut on their breath or being in the grocery cart. We have her tested annually by skin prick test and cap rast. I was hoping that there might be a chance that she has outgrown her allergy this year since she has not had a reaction in 4 years. Because of her high score, the allergist won't even attempt to do an oral challenge - they will only conisder an oral challenge with a cap rast score of 3 or lower. I do think it is beneficial to test annually to monitor any changes.
[This message has been edited by Caterina2 (edited October 11, 2002).]

Posted on: Fri, 10/11/2002 - 4:40am
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Joined: 11/14/2001 - 09:00

momofjen,
Do you mean your daughter tested a 5.0 on the CapRast or a class 5?
Same question to you Caterina2.
Because my son is smell sensitive(he reacts by sneezing, itching eyes, coughing, and not feeling well) and his CapRast was a 9.43 which is classified I believe as class 3.
I wanted to say this because that is low compared to other's and just because one has a high score doesn't mean they will be smell or touch sensitive. In our case anyway, who knows how accurate these scores on the Cap are in relation to telling us anything other than they ARE ALLERGIC and always be on guard.

Posted on: Fri, 10/11/2002 - 7:22am
momofjen's picture
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Joined: 10/07/2002 - 09:00

To clarify, my daughter is a class 5, no reactions to PB since her initial reaction at 12 months of age.( a few hives on face )
I have been told the same thing by my allergist about touch and smell sensitivity.Only a small percentage will react to touch or smell. It may be wishful thinking on my part, but I find it hard to believe that she could possibly be sensitive to touch or smell. Altough we are diligent with what she eats, we take her to restuarants where theres plenty of peanut butter toppins and icecream. I just can't believe that she never would have accidentally smelled or touched it somewhere like a grocery store cart.We certainly don't know if someone in her class ate Reeses cerael for breakfast. It could be on someones breath. Also, I allow my 12 year old to buy PBJ at school. In a way I wish I could test it to find out because I think I would relax a lot about the thought of her going to 1st grade and eating n the cafeteria. Wht are your thoughts on this?

Posted on: Sat, 10/12/2002 - 10:49am
Caterina2's picture
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Joined: 02/14/2001 - 09:00

My daughter's rast was also a Class 5 -- I worded this incorrectly on my last post. Her score was .86 and I was told that's a Class 5. When I read the different scores on this board, it's quite confusing. For example, Smack, your son's score was a 9.43 which is classified as a Class 3. I wish I understood these scores. Why is mine decimal 86 - Class 5 and yours 9.43 - Class 3. Could there possibly be different ways that scores are measured?

Posted on: Sat, 10/12/2002 - 9:42pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

momofjen,
We had our son "touch tested" at our allergist's office before he started preschool. He is contact reactive.
If you really need to know, I suggest doing a touch and/or smell test at the allergist's office. If it isn't necessary to know right now, I wouldn't do it - it would be another exposure.
Good luck.

Posted on: Sun, 10/13/2002 - 3:21am
Melrose Mum's picture
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Joined: 01/23/2002 - 09:00

On the subject of smell, I just asked Dr. Young about this the other night! What we need to remember is that the SMELL can be present WITHOUT the PROTEIN being present. You can smell peanut butter from quite a distance BUT the chances of the protein actually being arisolized (sp?) are minimal. However, cooking with peanut oil or roasting peanuts WILL send the peanut protein into the air (it needs heat to be released) and THEN it can be ingested through inhilation. There may be NO PEANUT SMELL in the air when cooking with peanut oil, but the protein can still be airborn! He also made a point of saying that SMELL CAN TRIGGER SYMPTOMS of an attack, BUT that it may be psychosomatic, a panic attack can look exactly like an allergic reaction, without being one. If there is any question, of course treat a multi-symptom reaction with an epi-pen! But be aware that it could be a false alarm, perhaps the child is stressed? Obviously, we should not easily brush off symptoms or label them "hysterical" our children aren't 'faking it.' We must continue to help our kids cope with PA without unnecessary fear. I was happy to hear that the PROTEIN is not as prone to being airborn just because the smell of PB was in the air! Diane

Posted on: Sun, 10/13/2002 - 3:41am
momofjen's picture
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That is good information.We were at a hockey game yesterday and all of a sudden I smelled a very strog peanut smell. I looked around and there was a lady sitting about 4 rows in front of us eaing peanut m&m's. My friend also noticed the smell. My PA daughter was next to me and was not affected. I just think it would be easier to know if ahe reacted to touch/smell because when we are out and I see someone eating any peanut item, I know she won't ea it , but I can't relax wondering if maybe that person will touch her or she'll touch something that was touched by that person. That's probably crazy beceaue we are out all the time and I have no idea if the person who sat in the same seat as us just finished a peanut butter snadwich. Maybe the less you know the better, in some instances!!

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