how often to retest

Posted on: Mon, 10/07/2002 - 10:56am
momofjen's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/07/2002 - 09:00

Hi everyone. I am not new to reading, but I am new to posting a question. My daughter is 5 years old and tested positive for PA, TNA, Sesame, and eggs when she was 12 months old. Her first and only reaction was a few hives on her face after eating a small piece of a peanut butter cookie at 12 months of age.Her skins tests at that age were positive for all of the above. At 3 and a half she had a Cap Rast for peanuts and was a 5. This is how we handle her allergy. All labels are read carefully. She never has amay contain product. She has never had store bought chocolate other than VNF. She has never has store bought baked goods, never shares her food. Up until last week when I read that many of you give your kids Ben and Jerry's, she had never had icecream. ( She had her first icecream , other tha my homemade and smiled for 3 days!!! ) We don't however call all kinds of companies. We eat in restuarants and trust that they are telling us what things are cooked in or around.Now you can understand our comfort level. My question is this. Since she has never reacted, do you think she should be retested periodically? Do you think that she is probably not touch or smell sensitive? How can it be that she has never come near anyone who has peanuts on their breath or peanut particles left on a grocery store cart? Maybe, I am just wishing this were the case. Has anyone ever heard of someone growing out of the allergy? I know someone who swears that her son outgrew it.Thanks in advance fo your imput.

Posted on: Mon, 10/07/2002 - 12:20pm
Chicago's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/21/2001 - 09:00

Welcome!
There is a thread on this topic on the "Living with PA" board. It is on the top now, so you should be able to find it.
It will show you there are lots of different "answers" to your question. You'll get more info, but will still need to develop your plan - what is best for your child.

Posted on: Mon, 10/07/2002 - 12:59pm
momofjen's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/07/2002 - 09:00

THANKS!!

Posted on: Tue, 10/08/2002 - 1:48pm
Melrose Mum's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/23/2002 - 09:00

I just saw Dr. Michael Young speak tonight and he is all for the CAP RAST (aka Immno CAP) test, if a child will outgrow the allergy (about 20% do) the CAP RAST is a good way to chart progress. He personally does a test once a year until age 6 (chances to 'resolve' drop quite a bit after age six) then again at puberty. (the hormonal change can affect allergies either way) hope that helps, Diane

Posted on: Thu, 10/10/2002 - 2:20am
DebbieK's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/05/2000 - 09:00

Dr. B. Zimmerman in Toronto has done some studies & has found that there is a certain sub-population of peanut allergic kids who are in hindsight more likely to outgrow their PA. (no asthma, eczema or other allergies). He has a great website which explains it all.
Debbie

Posted on: Thu, 10/10/2002 - 2:52am
momofjen's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/07/2002 - 09:00

What is the website? I would like to read up on it. My daughter has TNA as well as sesame , but no signs of exzema or asthma.

Posted on: Thu, 10/10/2002 - 5:16am
Wolfmeis's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/2001 - 09:00

Here is the link:
[url="http://www.drbarryzimmerman.com/foods/peanut_outgrow.htm"]http://www.drbarryzimmerman.com/foods/peanut_outgrow.htm[/url]
------------------
Lory
PA dd Graham
[url="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ChsFFAS/"]Charleston Family Food Allergy Support[/url]

Posted on: Fri, 10/11/2002 - 2:45am
BENSMOM's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/20/2000 - 09:00

momofjen, it's possible your daughter has outgrown or will outgrow the allergy. But whether or not that is the case, it is likely she is not touch or smell sensitive. Despite what you read on these boards, most pa people are not touch or smell sensitive. It seems that way here because it is people with the more severely allergic and reactive children that need the support the most. Life is much more complicated when you have to deal with touch and smell sensitivity. My son for example, is not touch or smell sensitive and does not eat at a peanut-free table at school. If there's ever a problem, we'll change that. I can't remember where I read this, but I think the pa people that are touch and smell sensitive are the minority.

Posted on: Fri, 10/11/2002 - 2:51am
BENSMOM's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/20/2000 - 09:00

momofjen, it's possible your daughter has outgrown or will outgrow the allergy. But whether or not that is the case, it is likely she is not touch or smell sensitive. Despite what you read on these boards, most pa people are not touch or smell sensitive. It seems that way here because it is people with the more severely allergic and reactive children that need the support the most. Life is much more complicated when you have to deal with touch and smell sensitivity. My son for example, is not touch or smell sensitive and does not eat at a peanut-free table at school. If there's ever a problem, we'll change that. I can't remember where I read this, but I think the pa people that are touch and smell sensitive are the minority.

Posted on: Fri, 10/11/2002 - 3:12am
Caterina2's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/14/2001 - 09:00

My daughter also had a cap rast test and scored a 5. She also has never had a reaction to smell or touch, however, the allergist said that because of her high score, she is probably smell and touch sensitive. I too thought the same as you about possible exposures by being near someone with peanut on their breath or being in the grocery cart. We have her tested annually by skin prick test and cap rast. I was hoping that there might be a chance that she has outgrown her allergy this year since she has not had a reaction in 4 years. Because of her high score, the allergist won't even attempt to do an oral challenge - they will only conisder an oral challenge with a cap rast score of 3 or lower. I do think it is beneficial to test annually to monitor any changes.
[This message has been edited by Caterina2 (edited October 11, 2002).]

Posted on: Fri, 10/11/2002 - 4:40am
smack's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/14/2001 - 09:00

momofjen,
Do you mean your daughter tested a 5.0 on the CapRast or a class 5?
Same question to you Caterina2.
Because my son is smell sensitive(he reacts by sneezing, itching eyes, coughing, and not feeling well) and his CapRast was a 9.43 which is classified I believe as class 3.
I wanted to say this because that is low compared to other's and just because one has a high score doesn't mean they will be smell or touch sensitive. In our case anyway, who knows how accurate these scores on the Cap are in relation to telling us anything other than they ARE ALLERGIC and always be on guard.

Pages

Peanut Free and Nut Free Community

Click on one of the categories below to see all topics and discussions.

Latest Discussions

Latest Post by krisztina Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:49pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by chicken Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:45pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by lexy Tue, 01/28/2020 - 12:21am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Sun, 01/26/2020 - 11:15am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Sun, 01/26/2020 - 11:11am
Comments: 5
Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 11:03am
Comments: 10
Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 10:52am
Comments: 2
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 01/14/2020 - 1:03pm
Comments: 1

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

If children begin to eat many different foods at a young age, there is much more of a chance that by the time they are in school, they will eat...

Those with peanut allergies often find that they are unable to enjoy dessert since there's always the...

If you've ever tried to find...

For those with peanut allergies, baked goods present a serious risk. Many baked goods do not appear to contain peanuts, yet were baked in a...

Those who have peanut allergies know to avoid peanut butter cookies, of course – but what about other...

Which candy bars are safe for those with peanut allergies? Those without allergies are accustomed to...

Are you looking for peanut-free candies as a special treat for a child with...

For those who have wondered whether airport x-ray machines negatively affect epinephrine auto-injectors, the folks at Food Allergy Research &...

Molecular allergy component testing identifies the specific food or environmental proteins triggering a person’s allergic reactions. Component...

An epinephrine auto-injector provides an emergency dose of epinephrine (adrenaline) to treat life-threatening allergic reactions. Those who have...

Misunderstanding the significance of food allergy test results can lead to unnecessary anxiety and dietary changes. The three tests used most...

It can be easy to overlook the presence of nut allergens in non-food items because the allergens are often listed by their Latin or scientific...

Tree nuts and peanuts are distinctly different. An allergy to one does not guarantee an allergy to the other. Peanuts are considered legumes and...

Welcome to the complex world of being a Peanut Allergy Parent. Get ready to proofread food labels, get creative with meals, and constantly hold an...

Take control of your food allergies! Get results in ten days and change your life forever! If you are tempted to use a home testing kit...

What can you eat if you can't eat peanut butter? Fortunately for people with a peanut allergy, there...

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, one out of five people in the U.S. has an allergy. Because there is a...

Eliminating peanut butter is the best way to handle a rash caused by this food

If your baby or toddler develops a rash caused by peanut...

Nearly all infants are fussy at times. But how do you know when your baby's crying means something wrong? Some babies are excessively fussy...

For those who don't have experience with peanut allergies, going 'peanut-free' often seems as easy as avoiding peanut butter sandwiches and bags...