How much exposure to peanuts before a reaction??

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 6:42am
MarkiesMom's picture
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Joined: 02/23/2006 - 09:00

Just curious, how many times was your child exposed to, or consumed peanut products before you saw a reaction?? And is there anyone here whose child is allergic to tree nuts, but symptomless with peanut consumption??

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 7:21am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

DD: never exposed prior to life-threatening anaphylaxis at 11 months.
Pistachio allergy is also life-threatening and the sensitizing event was putting a single found pistachio shell (not the nut) in her mouth briefly at 9 months old. We didn't know about that allergy until she was five and we skin tested for it. (One scary skin test)
Other TN: almonds... ate about ten almonds over three days... then broke out in hives. Filberts... ate them regularly for a few months, then noticed eczema flares, skin tested +. She also began testing + to the other tree nuts at around this time. We were feeding other TN based on negative SPT and RAST that our allergist felt meant she wasn't likely to be allergic (though we tried to point out that she really mightn't have been sensitized yet at four years old). *sigh* live and learn...
DH: walnut allergy, developed when he was very young (maybe two or three?). Life threatening, but higher threshold than DD's nut allergies. He can get away with the "taste and see" approach. He is not allergic to any other nuts, or to peanuts. He does have other minor FA.
I also know another adult who has got an ALMOND allergy like my DH's walnut allergy. She carries an AnaKit anyway for a beesting allergy.
So, anecdotally, I think TN allergies in isolation are more common that PA all by itself.

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 11:21am
SpudBerry's picture
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Joined: 07/23/2002 - 09:00

My PA son - well let's just say that we called him Wyatt - because he urped every time I nursed him. My doctors had told me that peanut butter was a great source of protien while nursing [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] The doctors were never concerned about the urping, because he was always bigger than his twin. The PB&J sandwich that I fed them at 13 months was the first "intentional" exposure to peanuts, he went into full blown anaphylaxis about 2 minutes after his first bite.
My son is PA only - still tests negative to all other nuts, but we still avoid all nuts.
------------------
Sherlyn
Mom to 6 year old twins Ben & Mike - one PA & the other not.
Stay Informed And Peanut Free!

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 2:01pm
lilpig99's picture
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Joined: 12/22/2005 - 09:00

Welcome Markie's Mom!
My 5 year old DD is severe TNA mostly to cashews but not PA.
As far as previous exposure to the offending nut (in her case, cashew) she was probably exposed only one time at 2 years old (she put her hand in a mixed nut jar at a christmas party...I never found out if she ate any or just put her fingers in her mouth...she got hives around her mouth after a minute or so). She was tested at the allergist and found to be zero for peanuts, and mildly 1+ for all tree nuts. We opted to continue giving her peanut butter which she'd been eating for about a year, but NO tree nuts. Unfortunately, the allergist didn't advise us to avoid may contains. And then she went on to eat granola bars daily! Granola bars without tree nuts, peanuts in them!!! No one ever told me about may contains...oh if had I known [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] ..but I firmly believe the may contains raised her allergy immensely. She ate 1/4 of a cashew the summer of 2004...because I remember the allergist said at 1+ levels...it wouldn't hurt her. (slapping my forehead) I can still hear myself thinking that after giving her a tiny piece... and BOOM...anaphylactic episode within one minute. Upon retesting, her cashew level rose to 4+ RAST...with only a 'maybe' exposure two years prior...but lots of may contains. Our story of exposure......sorry so long. And yes, live and learn!
------------------
Jill
DD, 5, TNA
DS, 18 mo. EA, MA

Posted on: Sat, 02/25/2006 - 3:51am
k9ruby's picture
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Joined: 03/25/2004 - 09:00

First ever reaction was anaphylatic at 7years, when my aunty got me some brazil nut cookies (she now feels extremly guilty!!) on my 7th birthday, and throat almost closed. I had a strong antihistimine, and it stablised...alligist said it will proubly never stablise again, more likely to be at least 3x worse.
2nd reaction was a moderate (not ana) to a milky way bar with traces of hazlenuts, when we manged to catch it in the VERY early stages of hives starting to brake out on my thighs.
3rd reaction was a severe contact (not ana) reaction with avon suncream, which made way face swell up a bit (not my throat, just my skin) and hives all over my body. We went to A&E to get checked out..docter was aksing if my thrioat was ok evry 10 secs lol!
4th reaction was from clinique again same reaction.(delayed...cant remember how long)
5th a tiny bit about the size of 50p peice touched my skin in the shower, same reaction (delayed by 7hours)
6th clinique..thought it was a different bar...got hives on my leg...then spread upwards. calms down.
7th.. 1 and a half years ago clinique again....whole body MASSIVE hives for 4 days.
I have had some mystery reactions aswell.
I'm 14

Posted on: Sat, 02/25/2006 - 3:52am
k9ruby's picture
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Joined: 03/25/2004 - 09:00

I forgot to mention im TNA not PA, but still aviod PN cus they give me the creeps

Posted on: Sat, 02/25/2006 - 6:48am
Darkmage's picture
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Joined: 10/01/2004 - 09:00

We started feeding pb&J to ds at about 15 months (on dr advice). He didn't really like it at first, but then started eating it just fine. He started reacting at 18 months (just hives). That's when we stopped feeding it to him. At just past 2 years old he got a bite of a little Ritz PB cracker before I took it away. No reaction. *whew* We got him tested for the first time at age 3. He is now 5, and has had no further contact or reactions to PN.
------------------
[i][b]Allergy Eliminator [/b][/i]

Posted on: Mon, 02/27/2006 - 1:01am
bethc's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

My DD ate peanut butter cookies 2 or 3 times as a 1YO with no apparent reaction. I suspect it was 3 times because that was the system I was following when introducing new foods to my babies, to watch for allergies. She may have had mouth tingling, because she didn't like the cookies. But no hives or anything. That made it hard to figure out her allergy when hives and swellling started happening; I thought I knew she wasn't allergic to peanuts.

Posted on: Mon, 02/27/2006 - 5:53am
momtotwokidz's picture
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Joined: 10/02/2005 - 09:00

We decided to wait until my son was 2 to try peanut butter. As I am vegetarian, I ate TONS of peanut butter while pg and almost daily while nursing (I was starving!), and at 13 weeks he started having 6-8 poops a day and then they turned bloody. I think now, it was the peanuts. He also developed ecezma by this time. So, first exposure IMHO, in utero, and then bfing.
At two, we gave him, or tried to give him peanut butter, he would not eat it, he would spit it out. We tried and tried the same reaction every time. SO we thought he did not like it. At 2.5 he developed ecezma on his face and we had him tested thinking it was something in our yard.
PA, came up and two months later, had him TN tested for things the we thought he has been exposed to, I think with the whole trace amounts thing in foods, well we should have had him tested for all, but he tested for almonds. Negative to some like walnuts.
He did not eat a lot of processed foods until he was closer to being 2 years old, so the trace amounts didn't hit him until then.
Therese

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 7:21am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

DD: never exposed prior to life-threatening anaphylaxis at 11 months.
Pistachio allergy is also life-threatening and the sensitizing event was putting a single found pistachio shell (not the nut) in her mouth briefly at 9 months old. We didn't know about that allergy until she was five and we skin tested for it. (One scary skin test)
Other TN: almonds... ate about ten almonds over three days... then broke out in hives. Filberts... ate them regularly for a few months, then noticed eczema flares, skin tested +. She also began testing + to the other tree nuts at around this time. We were feeding other TN based on negative SPT and RAST that our allergist felt meant she wasn't likely to be allergic (though we tried to point out that she really mightn't have been sensitized yet at four years old). *sigh* live and learn...
DH: walnut allergy, developed when he was very young (maybe two or three?). Life threatening, but higher threshold than DD's nut allergies. He can get away with the "taste and see" approach. He is not allergic to any other nuts, or to peanuts. He does have other minor FA.
I also know another adult who has got an ALMOND allergy like my DH's walnut allergy. She carries an AnaKit anyway for a beesting allergy.
So, anecdotally, I think TN allergies in isolation are more common that PA all by itself.

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 11:21am
SpudBerry's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/23/2002 - 09:00

My PA son - well let's just say that we called him Wyatt - because he urped every time I nursed him. My doctors had told me that peanut butter was a great source of protien while nursing [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] The doctors were never concerned about the urping, because he was always bigger than his twin. The PB&J sandwich that I fed them at 13 months was the first "intentional" exposure to peanuts, he went into full blown anaphylaxis about 2 minutes after his first bite.
My son is PA only - still tests negative to all other nuts, but we still avoid all nuts.
------------------
Sherlyn
Mom to 6 year old twins Ben & Mike - one PA & the other not.
Stay Informed And Peanut Free!

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 2:01pm
lilpig99's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/22/2005 - 09:00

Welcome Markie's Mom!
My 5 year old DD is severe TNA mostly to cashews but not PA.
As far as previous exposure to the offending nut (in her case, cashew) she was probably exposed only one time at 2 years old (she put her hand in a mixed nut jar at a christmas party...I never found out if she ate any or just put her fingers in her mouth...she got hives around her mouth after a minute or so). She was tested at the allergist and found to be zero for peanuts, and mildly 1+ for all tree nuts. We opted to continue giving her peanut butter which she'd been eating for about a year, but NO tree nuts. Unfortunately, the allergist didn't advise us to avoid may contains. And then she went on to eat granola bars daily! Granola bars without tree nuts, peanuts in them!!! No one ever told me about may contains...oh if had I known [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] ..but I firmly believe the may contains raised her allergy immensely. She ate 1/4 of a cashew the summer of 2004...because I remember the allergist said at 1+ levels...it wouldn't hurt her. (slapping my forehead) I can still hear myself thinking that after giving her a tiny piece... and BOOM...anaphylactic episode within one minute. Upon retesting, her cashew level rose to 4+ RAST...with only a 'maybe' exposure two years prior...but lots of may contains. Our story of exposure......sorry so long. And yes, live and learn!
------------------
Jill
DD, 5, TNA
DS, 18 mo. EA, MA

Posted on: Sat, 02/25/2006 - 3:51am
k9ruby's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/25/2004 - 09:00

First ever reaction was anaphylatic at 7years, when my aunty got me some brazil nut cookies (she now feels extremly guilty!!) on my 7th birthday, and throat almost closed. I had a strong antihistimine, and it stablised...alligist said it will proubly never stablise again, more likely to be at least 3x worse.
2nd reaction was a moderate (not ana) to a milky way bar with traces of hazlenuts, when we manged to catch it in the VERY early stages of hives starting to brake out on my thighs.
3rd reaction was a severe contact (not ana) reaction with avon suncream, which made way face swell up a bit (not my throat, just my skin) and hives all over my body. We went to A&E to get checked out..docter was aksing if my thrioat was ok evry 10 secs lol!
4th reaction was from clinique again same reaction.(delayed...cant remember how long)
5th a tiny bit about the size of 50p peice touched my skin in the shower, same reaction (delayed by 7hours)
6th clinique..thought it was a different bar...got hives on my leg...then spread upwards. calms down.
7th.. 1 and a half years ago clinique again....whole body MASSIVE hives for 4 days.
I have had some mystery reactions aswell.
I'm 14

Posted on: Sat, 02/25/2006 - 3:52am
k9ruby's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/25/2004 - 09:00

I forgot to mention im TNA not PA, but still aviod PN cus they give me the creeps

Posted on: Sat, 02/25/2006 - 6:48am
Darkmage's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/01/2004 - 09:00

We started feeding pb&J to ds at about 15 months (on dr advice). He didn't really like it at first, but then started eating it just fine. He started reacting at 18 months (just hives). That's when we stopped feeding it to him. At just past 2 years old he got a bite of a little Ritz PB cracker before I took it away. No reaction. *whew* We got him tested for the first time at age 3. He is now 5, and has had no further contact or reactions to PN.
------------------
[i][b]Allergy Eliminator [/b][/i]

Posted on: Mon, 02/27/2006 - 1:01am
bethc's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

My DD ate peanut butter cookies 2 or 3 times as a 1YO with no apparent reaction. I suspect it was 3 times because that was the system I was following when introducing new foods to my babies, to watch for allergies. She may have had mouth tingling, because she didn't like the cookies. But no hives or anything. That made it hard to figure out her allergy when hives and swellling started happening; I thought I knew she wasn't allergic to peanuts.

Posted on: Mon, 02/27/2006 - 5:53am
momtotwokidz's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/02/2005 - 09:00

We decided to wait until my son was 2 to try peanut butter. As I am vegetarian, I ate TONS of peanut butter while pg and almost daily while nursing (I was starving!), and at 13 weeks he started having 6-8 poops a day and then they turned bloody. I think now, it was the peanuts. He also developed ecezma by this time. So, first exposure IMHO, in utero, and then bfing.
At two, we gave him, or tried to give him peanut butter, he would not eat it, he would spit it out. We tried and tried the same reaction every time. SO we thought he did not like it. At 2.5 he developed ecezma on his face and we had him tested thinking it was something in our yard.
PA, came up and two months later, had him TN tested for things the we thought he has been exposed to, I think with the whole trace amounts thing in foods, well we should have had him tested for all, but he tested for almonds. Negative to some like walnuts.
He did not eat a lot of processed foods until he was closer to being 2 years old, so the trace amounts didn't hit him until then.
Therese

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