How Many Have Had A Reaction To Something They Thought Was Safe?

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Generally, I place these questions under Living with PA, but I've thought about it and because there is a point, I'm placing it under Main Discussion.

How many of us have had children or ourselves react to something that we thought was safe for them/us to consume?

My son's first three reactions (two of which were anaphylactic), no, the food was not safe.

His fourth reaction, hive only, cross contamination to something we thought was safe.

His fifth reaction, anaphylactic, again, cross contamination, to something we thought was safe.

His sixth and seventh reactions, this past summer, were to something that the company would still maintain was safe.

Many thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ "That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

On Jan 5, 2006

I read this post.

But I can't answer it - in all honesty, really.

What do you 'want' me to say, kwim?

I mean -- define 'safe'.

'in what sense'?

Safe that it doesnt LIST the allergen.. it 'may contain...' the allergen.

Jason

------------------ [b]* Obsessed * [/b]

On Jan 5, 2006

Count us in:

1. Dd ate soy ice cream for years and then had a reaction. Turns out it was on shared equipment with peanuts and not stated.

2. Dd also allergic to milk ate Van De Kamps cinnamon rolls for nine months and then had a reaction. Turns out milk was an ingredient and when they changed their packaging they accidentally left it off the ingredient list.

On Jan 5, 2006

My 3-year-old ds had a reaction to Jett Puff Marshmallows made by Kraft. They do not contain peanuts but after the reaction I was told that all their equipment is made to be interchangable. I later found out that an item containing peanuts was run on the same machienary. I was so disappointed.

On Jan 5, 2006

Jason, you might want to ask that question separately - what does one consider "safe"?

When I raised the question, I meant something that looked as though it was labeled well, "safely", and was "safe" for our PA children to eat. I think that's KWIM-able.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ "That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

On Jan 5, 2006

Yep - Haagen Dazs ice cream that turned out to be made on shared equipment, and McVitie's cookies which were supposed to be safe. (Seems someone else on the board had a reaction to them as well, and it turned out that they were "soon changing the label to indicate shared equipment". Yeah. A little late, thanks very much.)

Incidents like these as well as the recalls we see weekly make me step back from criticizing anyone else's comfort zone, even if my first reaction is that they go overboard. KWIM?

Amy

On Jan 5, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by Going Nuts: [b]Incidents like these as well as the recalls we see weekly make me step back from criticizing anyone else's comfort zone, even if my first reaction is that they go overboard. KWIM?

Amy[/b]

Loved this part of your post, Going Nuts.

I was just thinking over the last day or so. I mean, my guy had the first reaction this summer to Boca Burgers but it must have been so NOTHING that I okayed him eating another burger within the week. What I mean, is, I didn't know what had happened the first time to him was a reaction, until he had eaten a burger from the same box within the week and something happened again.

So, if I can kinda go la dee dah, didn't even know there was a reaction happening (it was not anaphylactic and neither was the next reaction to the same burgers), and it was to something that we thought was safe, but it was something that we had never eaten before (so yes, I should beat myself up for not having my eyes on him like a hawk when he tried a new food), I just kinda think it's possible.....

It's possible for anything..... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

But yes, when you have experienced the queer things that you have personally experienced, and you, yourself find them strange (especially when the company goes out of their way to say that "no way no how" could this have happened and yet you know it did), then yes, it does make it difficult to question other people's comfort zones.

I mean, all of those things that Jess ate that I thought were "safe" were labeled safely and when I contacted the manufacturers in 2 out of the 3 circumstances, they all maintained that there was no possible way that it was a PA reaction. I know it was.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ "That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

On Jan 5, 2006

Yes, Timmy has had reactions to things that according to the label "should" have been safe... Anaphalactic reaction to Chips Ahoy cookie and to Kellogg's Frosted Rice Krispies cereal. Both swear that there was no way they could be contaminated but when questioned further both were made on shared equipment.

Valerie

On Jan 5, 2006

Valerie, good to see you! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ "That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

On Jan 6, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by csc: [b]

It's possible for anything..... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

[/b]

I mean if whole leaf tea from Starbuck's could be contaminated... Who would have ever thought of that?

Amy

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