How many allergic to Sesame seeds??? - Peanut Allergy Information

How many allergic to Sesame seeds???

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My dd Cap RAST came back and she was very high to sesame- Is sesame considered a nut?? I looked at a chinese sauce that eats frequently and it has sesame oil in it? Is oil different than the actual seeds??

Thanks, Gwen

On Jul 25, 2003

Sesame oil does contain sesame protein. My son is allergic to sesame. It is a big problem when we try to buy bread--most bread contains a warning about seeds.

Sesame is not a nut. It's a seed. You need to find out about foods and cuisines that contain sesame so you will be able to avoid them. Chinese food, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Middle Eastern, all contain sesame. Tahini is a paste made of sesame seeds. All the Middle Eastern dips and spreads that are so popular (Hummos, Baba Ghanoush, etc.) contain tahini.

Interesting that your child has been eating sesame and not reacting. My son sometimes seemed to be reacting to sesame so I had him tested. His reactions were not as severe as the reactions to peanuts, but he is allergic and sesame is a dangerous allergy and is known to cause anaphylactic reactions. There are several threads about sesame allergy because a lot of people with PA also have sesame allergy. I will try to find some of the discussions and pull them up.

On Jul 25, 2003

Dear Gwen:

My DD is also allergic to sesame, as well as sunflower, safflower, mustard and poppyseed. The allergist indicated we should avoid all seeds, as the allergy may shift from one seed to another. From the research I did sesame oil is one of the few oils in North America wich is cold pressed. Apparently this process does not remove all the protein matter, versus the other method (can't remember the name) which destroys the protein matter. Does anyone know what the chances are of outgrowing it?

On Jul 25, 2003

HI!

I am severely allergic to peanut, tnx, sesame and poppyseeds. I know I have a contact allergy to sesame b/c I took off a 1 sesame seed off a bagel (I know very stupid) and it caused my entire face to swell but did not require epi.

Allison

On Jul 25, 2003

After years of eating sesame without incident, my son became allergic to sesame about 4 years ago. His allergist's advice was to "tread carefully" with all seeds. For whatever reason, PA and Sesame allergy often go together, although the two are not botanically related.

Amy

On Jul 25, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by chuser: [b]From the research I did sesame oil is one of the few oils in North America wich is cold pressed. Apparently this process does not remove all the protein matter, versus the other method (can't remember the name) which destroys the protein matter.[/b]

The other methods are heat/expeller and solvent extraction. (Cold pressing may also use an expeller type system, but without the heat) Most oils are hot pressed. Some exceptions are any olive oil with the word "virgin" on the label, walnut oil, a couple others. Some oils can only be reasonably obtained through solvent extraction, like grapeseed oil. Most of the oils we consume are produced through solvent extraction, which involves separating the oil from the seed/nut with a toxic, explosive solvent and then evaporating the solvent away. In a lot of cases, this is done to recover oil from the meal that is left after a first pressing or expelling run, then the recovered oil is just added to the original pressed oil. I was always under the impression that most sesame oil was hot pressed and used in snacks, margarine, and asian cooking (except for cold pressed boutique/organic/etc oils).

Cold pressed oils retain a lot of character of the original nut/seed/fruit because they are not exposed to excessive heat or industrial-grade solvents. (Note that "cold" in this case just means room temperature) Hot pressing and solvent extraction destroy this and give a more consistent, but sterile, product.

I could be wrong, but it's not likely.

On Jul 27, 2003

I scored fairly high on the RAST test for sesame seeds, but I never remember having a problem with them in the past.

Actually I just had a burger with them on the other day and I was ok. I guess I should talk to my allergist more about this, eh?

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