How Did You Find Out You/Your Child Was PA?

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 1:54pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

How did you find out you were PA or find out your child was PA?

This stems from a thread running under Media.

I found out my son was PA when I gave him a bite of my Eatmore bar (peanuts in it) and he had a reaction. He was 18 months old.

Many thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 2:04pm
teacher's picture
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Joined: 11/02/2000 - 09:00

He was 22 months and we were at Dairy Queen. He put his spoon into my Peanut Buster Parfait and had a lick of (what looked like) just plain vanilla ice cream.
By the time we got home he was covered in hives, so I turned right around and took him to the E.R. I have no idea why I knew to do that, but I did.
The doc in the E.R. suspected peanuts right away, even though he hadn't eaten a peanut. (He clearly only had a trace of it from peanut-laden vanilla ice cream.) We saw his pediatrician who agreed and then we were sent to a pediatric allergist, who gave him the pinprick test. He tested 4+++ for peanuts.

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 2:12pm
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Joined: 09/20/2000 - 09:00

my son had terrible eczema, head to toe from the time he was about 2 weeks old. he was totally breastfed, so by the time he was 4 months old, the dr. thought we should do some testing for food allergies. He tested positive for about 3/4 of the foods , and his peanut was very high. I had eaten a lot of peanutbutter while pregnant and nursing...had no idea. He is six and has never had a reaction to peanuts that we are aware of, but still tests pretty high on both his cap rast and skin test. He outgrw all other food allergies except some tree nuts,and bananas. he has a ton of environmental allergies now and asthma, and just started allergy shots last month. Jen

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 2:59pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

The short version? THE HARD WAY.
The long version?
Our pediatrician thought we needed to give our 11 month old daughter more fat since she was at that point suspected to be dairy sensitive and was weaning herself.
He suggested egg... even [i]we[/i] knew THAT was a bad idea... we countered by asking about PB, which he thought was fine. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img] [note... too bad we didn't know how bad an idea [i]that[/i] would turn out to be]
(This was a baby with chronic eczema, intermittent wheeze and a strong family history of severe allergies and asthma.... DUH.)
Anyway, my DH one glorious May morning gave our daughter a single cheerio smeared with a very thin coating of creamy peanut butter. I walked into our kitchen, saw her chewing, turned to get a cup of coffee, and had enough time for my husband and I to have the following conversation;
"I gave her a taste of peanut butter on a cheerio."
"Oh? So how's she like it?"
"She Loves-"
(But he didn't even finish the sentence because she had begun SCREAMING like I have never ever [b]ever[/b] heard a baby scream in my life.) Bone chilling.
I dropped my coffee cup in the sink where it shattered.
I turned around to see my daughter had, IN LESS THAN A MINUTE after her first exposure, swelled up.
DH was having trouble getting her out of her seat and the elastic on her clothes was cutting into her arms. She was so covered with hives she was simply red and misshapen and puffy.
We had gotten in trouble with our HMO once before for taking our daughter to urgent care at the local hospital without calling their helpline first for a referral... so that is what my DH did.
The nurse could hear my daughter's choked screams and as soon as she heard the word "peanut" she SCREAMED at my husband to call 9-1-1. I heard this from across the room and in between DD's screams. My DH explained that we were two blocks from the ER and she again screamed at him to drive her ourselves. NOW.
We raced out of our driveway still pulling clothes on, and drove the two blocks to the emergency room, where there was no doctor present and the nursing staff didn't even examine her for the first thirty minutes. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/mad.gif[/img]
By the time we got to the ER less than ten minutes after the cheerio, the screaming had stopped and my daughter was floppy and unresponsive as I held her in my arms. She was still covered in hives and puffy, however. Just.... ominously pale and only semi-conscious. She looked like she was made of wax.
Six years later, I can still hear those screams in my mind. I still shake with horror when I remember holding my baby in that hospital room and wondering why nobody was trying to help her. I don't recall bargaining or anything else-- just thinking that I could not bear to live if she died. Total recall. It's as if my body even remembers.
[This message has been edited by Corvallis Mom (edited February 14, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 4:42pm
forJacob's picture
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Corvallis Mom, I am soooo sorry you had to go through that. How absolutely horrifying! I also live 2 blocks from an ER, but I think we both learned the hard way that it's better to just call 9-1-1.
My story is more similar to one of the posts above. My son was breastfed exclusively except for the times I gave him free samples of milk and soy formula "for fun" cuz I get a strange thrill out of freebies. My son had horrible eczema all from the age of 3 weeks, and I was eating PB&J for the first 2 months I was B/Fing because I used to be a PB lover. I went through 3 jars! When I finally did research and learned that eczema could be triggered by food allergies, I KNEW my son would be allergic to Peanut (and milk and soy and everything else). I eliminated PB from my diet for the most part, and then one time, at 6 months, there was a FREE donut with peanuts on it, and I said, "what the heck, maybe he's not allergic to peanuts." Then I ate the donut and I breastfed him and he was covered with head to toe hives immediately. I then avoided PB until he was 1 year when he was CAP rasted. He was allergic to many things, but his RAST score to peanut was 42, and I cried and cried on the phone the day I got the news from the allergist. I had never cried so suddenly and so hard at any news before that day. The next two years, his CAP for peanut were off the charts. We have since had an asthmatic airborne reaction, and a hivey manufactured-on reaction but last October, 4.5 years after the initial diagnosis, he had his first anaphylactic reaction to peanut in contaminated soymilk, and I've been visiting this board almost daily ever since then.

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 4:43pm
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Joined: 10/16/2001 - 09:00

Corvallis Mom, I am soooo sorry you had to go through that. How absolutely horrifying! I also live 2 blocks from an ER, but I think we both learned the hard way that it's better to just call 9-1-1.
My story is more similar to one of the posts above. My son was breastfed exclusively except for the times I gave him free samples of milk and soy formula "for fun" cuz I get a strange thrill out of freebies. My son had horrible eczema all from the age of 3 weeks, and I was eating PB&J for the first 2 months I was B/Fing because I used to be a PB lover. I went through 3 jars! When I finally did research and learned that eczema could be triggered by food allergies, I KNEW my son would be allergic to Peanut (and milk and soy and everything else). I eliminated PB from my diet for the most part, and then one time, at 6 months, there was a FREE donut with peanuts on it, and I said, "what the heck, maybe he's not allergic to peanuts." Then I ate the donut and I breastfed him and he was covered with head to toe hives immediately. I then avoided PB until he was 1 year when he was CAP rasted. He was allergic to many things, but his RAST score to peanut was 42, and I cried and cried on the phone the day I got the news from the allergist. I had never cried so suddenly and so hard at any news before that day. The next two years, his CAP for peanut were off the charts. We have since had an asthmatic airborne reaction, and a hivey manufactured-on reaction but last October, 4.5 years after the initial diagnosis, he had his first anaphylactic reaction to peanut in contaminated soymilk, and I've been visiting this board almost daily ever since then.

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 11:23pm
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Joined: 06/12/2002 - 09:00

My son had a tiny bite of pb ice cream at nine months old. Our pediatrician told us to let him taste peanut butter then. He immediately broke out in hives.

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 11:54pm
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Joined: 09/06/2005 - 09:00

We went to the peditrician in the morning for his 18 month checkup. I asked him about trying peanut butter, since noone in either family had food allergies. He said it should be no problem. We went home and I gave him a cracker with peanut butter on it, he took a small bite and immediately broke out in hives from his neck up. The doctor's office is only blocks away, so I called and the nurse told me to give him benadryl and bring him to the office immediately. There he was watched for 2 hours where there were no serious complications. Not the way I would have like to have found out. So we tested my younger son, before giving him peanuts, and found out he's allergic to wheat, go figure.
Kathy

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 1:24am
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Joined: 10/28/2005 - 09:00

My son had recently begun saying "Apple", so when we asked what he wanted for a snack he said "apple" and I cut up an apple and gave it to him. He was 16 months old. He wasn't impressed with the apple, so I though -- what if I put a little peanut butter on it? I stood over him saying -- I hope you're not allergic to peanut butter -- ha, ha. He ate it up and loved the peanut butter -- probably had about a teaspoon of it total. We all went into the living room afterwards and he was crying and his eyes were all red -- I thought, well maybe he got some apple or peanut butter in his eyes. I got a wash cloth and wiped him off and he sat in my lap facing away from me. The teletubbies came on TV and he got up and was laughing and clapping. Then he turned around and I saw that his eyes had swollen almost completely shut and his lips were huge! My husband called the doctor's office while I called 911 -- they kept telling us to give him Benadryl which we didn't have -- I ran to a neighbor's house to try and get some, but by then the ambulance was there. They came in and checked his oxygen which was fine and the swelling was starting to go down -- they didn't give epinephrine or benadryl at our house. We took him in the ambulance to the hospital (which I recommend b/c they got us right in) -- There they gave him benadryl and a steroid -- the swelling went down pretty quickly and he watched Blues Clues for a couple of hours and then they sent us home with instructions to take him to an allergist that week ASAP. It's amazing how I remember every detail of that day... he has had no reactions since then, but it's only been 4 months. He did test positive by RAST and skin test to peanuts -- and skin tested slightly and maybe falsely positive to walnuts and pistachios. We are very diligent in keeping him away from all nuts and may contains -- he had a very low RAST score (.83), but based on his reaction -- we're extremely careful.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 1:33am
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Joined: 07/23/2002 - 09:00

I was happily chatting on the phone with my husband - we was working. I was telling him all about how I was feeding the boys their first ever PB&J. He was announcing the big news to all of his co-workers. Needless to say, the happy chatty thing didn't last long. At first I just got off the phone because PA son was rubbing his eye wildly - I was sure he must have gotten some pb in it - they were only 13 months old & stuff like that happens - right?
Well, after lots of panic and phone calls back & forth, most of us ended up at the hospital together - me & PA son via ambulance, hubby met us there - non PA twin got sent over to the next door neighbors.
Full blown anaphylaxis - and yes, I had been told it was OK to introduce peanuts at 12 months by Denver's top pediatric group.
------------------
Sherlyn
Mom to 6 year old twins Ben & Mike - one PA & the other not.
Stay Informed And Peanut Free!

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 1:41am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Thanks, everyone. Obviously, DH and I both have PTSD over that day. I would also agree that calling 9-1-1 is best.
HOWEVER, I still would have taken her ourselves. We lived then and live now in a place where she can literally be IN the emergency room well BEFORE an ambulance can reach us. Given the speed of [i]all[/i] my daughter's reactions these are minutes we (personally) cannot afford to lose, even with epi. If she had a major reaction somewhere other than our home, of course I would call for an ambulance transport. I also would know enough to be a huge, loud PITA to ER staff until they begin treating her. (This at two allergists' insistence, since neither hospital admit resulted in BP checks during anaphylaxis and both should have.) If we had been more obnoxious, the little community hospital could have stabilized her and transported her to Mankato and the real emergency room there. (We lived in a still tornado-ravaged MN town twenty minutes away at the time.)
Anyway. The reason I shared that story in all its glory is that you don't always have time to think about what to do. Our story is why keeping an epipen out in a car or locked in an office is [i]simply unacceptable[/i] and I think it can graphically illustrate the point for someone else. And perhaps save someone's life because epinephrine wasn't delayed by even a minute or two.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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