Homeschooling in Minnesota

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 4:37am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I know this subject has been posted many times, but I wanted an answer from some current families who are homeschooling their child or children. My son is 3 and a half and has PA, so far that is all we know of. My husband thinks I should think of homeschooling him. I currently do daycare at my home, so he is always with me. I just want to know, if I plan to do this, how you got started, what kind of education do you have to have to homeschool, do you work, do you and your child have to take a test, etc? I know the requirements must be different for each state. I am from Minnesota, so if anyone from my state could help me with my questions I would appreciate it. Reading about all the stuff that happens in the schools really scares me. He tests 4 out of 6, so I know it wouldn't take much for a reaction. The schools really don't seem that concerned, from what I have read. I just don't think they realize how serious it is. Even my own mother didn't believe how deadly it was until I had to prove it to her by showing her stats on PA. Anyway, any answers would be appreciated. Thanks!

Jan

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 5:55am
darthcleo's picture
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Joined: 11/08/2000 - 09:00

I'm not from Minnesota, but no state will require a diploma to homeschool your own children.
I'll check a few books I have here, that describes the law per state and will post again tonight. Hopefully, you'll have a Minnesotan answering too.

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 6:06am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Thank you for taking the time to look it up. I was told by a relative that it was a requirement to have a 4 year college degree, of which I do not.
Jan

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 6:18am
momjd's picture
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Joined: 02/24/2002 - 09:00

I didn't read the actual statute, just the linked summary but it appears that you CAN homeschool without a degree. My read of the statement is that if you don't have a degree then you have to submit more paperwork. Of course, you'd want to contact your state or school district 'authority' on the matter to confirm.
If you do a search on 'Minnesota homeschool law' you will find links to the exact text of the statute as well as your state's dept. of education contact to find out the specifics.
Here's the link I looked at:
[url="http://www.nhen.org/leginfo/detail.asp?StateCode=Minnesota"]http://www.nhen.org/leginfo/detail.asp?StateCode=Minnesota[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 7:59am
darthcleo's picture
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Joined: 11/08/2000 - 09:00

From the HSLDA.org website
[url="http://www.hslda.org/laws/default.asp?State=MN"]http://www.hslda.org/laws/default.asp?State=MN[/url]
Legal Option:
Establish and operate a qualified home school
Attendance:
None
Subjects:
Reading, writing, literature, fine arts, math, science, history, geography, government, health, and physical education
Qualifications:
None
Notice:
File a "Non-Public Education Compulsory Instructions Report" with the local superintendent by October 1 of each school
Recordkeeping:
If only teacher qualification is to be child's parent, submit a quarterly report to the local superintendent showing the achievement of each child in the required subjects
Testing:
Administer an annual standardized test as agreed to by the local superintendent
=====
So basically you have to submit a portfolio on a quaterly basis. Bit of a hassle, but doable nonetheless. Definitely, you don't need a teacher's certificate, nor a college degree.
Local organisation:
[url="http://www.hslda.org/orgs/default.asp?State=MN"]http://www.hslda.org/orgs/default.asp?State=MN[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 8:05am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Thanks for all your help.
Jan

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 8:59am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I guess what I also should have asked is do you enjoy teaching them from home and are they happy to be at home? Also, do you have them do extra curricular activities such as football or volleyball through your schools? Thanks!
Jan

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 11:00am
darthcleo's picture
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Joined: 11/08/2000 - 09:00

I *totally* enjoy teaching them. My eldest is in a mix of first/second/third and fourth grade ;-)
He writes like a first grader, his math is second grade, his history & geography are 3rd and 4th. And his science is all over the place.
My daughter is too young - she turned 3 last weekend, although she does "school" with us. She draws, knows her numbers up to 16 (16 steps on our staircase) and all her letters. She can spell her name. So she's ahead too.
What I really like is the synergy we can get, that no single school can. Example that happened recently. We're doing Ancient Egyptian mythology. When we went grocery shopping, there was a product from Egypt that had the name of a god. Well, since I'm the teacher, (rather the guide, I let him teach himself) I *knew* he knew about it, so I pointed it out. We played hide and seek, I see an Egyptian God, can you find it ?
We went walking in the forest this week, looking for branches to build arrows, and we played the prehistory game. We're hunters, and there are warriors from another tribe (anyone we would meet) and we'd have to hide. It fits with a story we read this week. Again, if the story had been read at school, it would have been much harder for me to play this game.
Take a look at this study that was done in Canada. It bases most of its conclusion on US data, so it's relevant for you too.
[url="http://fraserinstitute.org/shared/readmore.asp?sNav=pb&id=253"]http://fraserinstitute.org/shared/readmore.asp?sNav=pb&id=253[/url]
The Fraser Institute is a leading market researcher in Canada, influencing policy-making. In short, it's trustworthy. They studied homeschooling to see if it should be regulated, allowed/disallowed, etc.. and the answer is that homeschooling is *way* ahead of anything that standard schooling can give. INCLUDING socialisation!!!
[b]Executive Summary: This paper establishes that home schooling is a thriving educational movement both in Canada and the United States. It also empirically demonstrates that the academic and socialization outcomes for the average home schooled child are superior to those experienced by the average public school student.
[/b]

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 11:04am
darthcleo's picture
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Joined: 11/08/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by ryan'smom:
[b]Also, do you have them do extra curricular activities such as football or volleyball through your schools?
Jan[/b]
Forgot this question. We are underground homeschoolers. This means that the local school board doesn't know about us. No hassle, but no services. We're still above the law because our child is long-distance schooled from France. He has a student ID in France, just as if he was attending a private school.

Posted on: Thu, 09/11/2003 - 11:16am
darthcleo's picture
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Joined: 11/08/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by ryan'smom:
[b]are they happy to be at home?
Jan[/b]
Another important question that I forgot to address.
They both love being home. My son is not very social in general, my daughter is. My daughter's too young to know better yet, so I won't discuss her.
My son however dislikes big groups. If we walk in front of a school that is in recess, he'll want to walk on the other side of the street. Imagine if he was with the kids!
That said, there are plenty of advantages, like getting up when they feel like it, no rushing for the school bus. Our neighbour has a son the same age who started kindergarden this year. The mom says her life is now controlled by the clock. Get him to school, get him back for lunch, back to school, back home. She has no freedom anymore. We can leave for a whole day to pick apples if we want to. And we can pick the day with the best weather!
My two kids have learned to play together very well. They love each other. I am told by homeschooling families with older children that this bond just becomes stronger. I would be a bit worried about a single kid, but not too worried. I know many families with just one kid. It's just more important to get out. My son starts boy scout next week, for example. (it's peanut free) He has swimming lessons, attends day camp in the summer, has music lessons. So he does see boys his age. Plus we go to the park almost every day because there's no homework. Ever.

Posted on: Fri, 09/12/2003 - 12:39am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Darthcleo-Wow, thanks for all the input on homeschooling. I also have another son who turned one in July, so Ryan would not be alone all day without anyone to play with. Ryan also knows his numbers from 0-20, knows all his letters, shapes, colors, etc. So I think he would get very bored in a general school setting. I have heard of a couple people that do field trips with other homeschooled parents. I think it is just the neatest thing to be able to teach your kids at home. I know I hated school and I would be crushed if they ended up hating school as much as I did. Especially if Ryan would get picked on because of his PA, that would really stink. He is a very outgoing person, however, so I would have to get him involved in some activities outside the home, but that would be fine with me. Thanks again for all your help.
Jan

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