Homeschool son starting 3rd grade in a few weeks!

Posted on: Tue, 12/19/2006 - 11:39am
momfreed's picture
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Joined: 12/19/2006 - 09:00

My 9 yos will be starting 3rd grade in the local public school. He has been homeschooled since kindergarten because his kindergarten teacher told me she was "uncomfortable" with his peanut allergy. We have finally decided to try it again. But after searching these forums, I'm starting to have second thoughts again. I am interested in any topics of discussion my dh and I might have with the principal. We have a meeting scheduled on Thursday 12/21.

Also, if you had the option, would you keep your PA child home? I am still homeschooling my 1st grader and preschooler.

Posted on: Tue, 12/19/2006 - 12:08pm
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

Look into getting your son a 504 plan. You can read more here in the Schools forum, or go to [url="http://www.allergysupport.org"]www.allergysupport.org[/url] for good information on this topic.
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 4 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2006 - 12:34am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I guess I would need to know what your reasons were for:
1. HSing in the first place, and
2. deciding to try conventional schooling again.
I mean, it is really about the individual child. If your 3rd grader pines for "school" and you think this is attainable, then by all means work through accommodations with your school and pack him lunch every morning. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
If it is because you feel uneasy that you may be creating "gaps" in his education, then deal with that issue....
I mean, you probably weren't HSing purely out of fear for your PA child, right? Since you are HSing your other children as well...
Another option which exists in some states is a cybercharter. It is distance learning, conducted at home, with the full support of a certified teacher and IT IS FREE. It is technically "public school." This is the route we have gone since DD wanted so badly to have a "real school," but the accommodations she needs are really over the top (or would seem that way to administrators). Anyway, most cybercharters are administered by either Connections Academy or K-12. They run charters in many states. We're with CA and DD loves it.
I think that if you decide to send your child into the school system, however, you will want to get a 504 plan in place as soon as possible. And I might continue HSing until there is one.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2006 - 1:02am
kelly01's picture
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Joined: 03/19/2001 - 09:00

Hi momfreed:
I think that when you read this board you get the impression that many (if not most) folks have issues with sending their PA children to school, etc. That is probably a function of this being a support board...many posts are related to areas of concern, people asking for resources, and the like.
My son is in fourth grade and attends parochial school. The school is not peanut free, and there is not even a peanut free table in the lunchroom (not because it was refused, we never asked for it). We do ask that parents not send in nut or peanut containing snacks for a classroom event (but they can bring "may contains", in that case my son just gets his own treat out of a treat bag).
He has been navigating school for almost 5 years now with no incidences. The teachers are aware, he is very careful, (when he was younger I checked out "party" snacks ahead of time for him...now he does the checking and decision making himself), and he has emergency procedures in place.
This might not be for everyone, but I think (opinion only) based on the other children I know with PA who's parents are not even aware of this website...what we do is similar to how many of children with PA handle this allergy.
Just make the decision that is right for you, but for us, at least, homeschooling is not a necessity. Many folks on this board homeschool, but I think for most there are other reasons they make that choice.
Kelly

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2006 - 1:03am
momfreed's picture
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Joined: 12/19/2006 - 09:00

Those are great ideas. I'm going to look into cybercharter. I've never heard of that. You're right that the PA was not the only reason to homeschool. It was one of our initial reasons, but we enjoyed it, so we continued. Now, I have a new baby and the four of them together seem like too much for me right now.
My husband is a teacher in the SD. We are meeting with the principal tomorrow. We have written down a list of things to discuss with him, but my husband said (after I read to him from these forums) that if they seem in any way unwilling, we will just keep him home. Which, in a way, feels better to me. Maybe I'll just have to come up with a new game plan for school at home.
Thank you for your ideas.
Caryn

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2006 - 1:09am
caryn's picture
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Joined: 11/20/2002 - 09:00

hi I was reading this post out of interest only -- and just responded because you signed the last post with your name -- which happens to be my name -- I don't very often see it spelled the same [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] just thought i would say HI!!!
caryn

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2006 - 3:45am
Ohio's picture
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Joined: 05/23/2005 - 09:00

I just e-mailed you the "agenda" that we took to our initial meeting with the school. This was geared towards kindergarten, but thought it might help you.
Kevin

Posted on: Tue, 12/19/2006 - 12:08pm
Momcat's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

Look into getting your son a 504 plan. You can read more here in the Schools forum, or go to [url="http://www.allergysupport.org"]www.allergysupport.org[/url] for good information on this topic.
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 4 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2006 - 12:34am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I guess I would need to know what your reasons were for:
1. HSing in the first place, and
2. deciding to try conventional schooling again.
I mean, it is really about the individual child. If your 3rd grader pines for "school" and you think this is attainable, then by all means work through accommodations with your school and pack him lunch every morning. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
If it is because you feel uneasy that you may be creating "gaps" in his education, then deal with that issue....
I mean, you probably weren't HSing purely out of fear for your PA child, right? Since you are HSing your other children as well...
Another option which exists in some states is a cybercharter. It is distance learning, conducted at home, with the full support of a certified teacher and IT IS FREE. It is technically "public school." This is the route we have gone since DD wanted so badly to have a "real school," but the accommodations she needs are really over the top (or would seem that way to administrators). Anyway, most cybercharters are administered by either Connections Academy or K-12. They run charters in many states. We're with CA and DD loves it.
I think that if you decide to send your child into the school system, however, you will want to get a 504 plan in place as soon as possible. And I might continue HSing until there is one.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2006 - 1:02am
kelly01's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/19/2001 - 09:00

Hi momfreed:
I think that when you read this board you get the impression that many (if not most) folks have issues with sending their PA children to school, etc. That is probably a function of this being a support board...many posts are related to areas of concern, people asking for resources, and the like.
My son is in fourth grade and attends parochial school. The school is not peanut free, and there is not even a peanut free table in the lunchroom (not because it was refused, we never asked for it). We do ask that parents not send in nut or peanut containing snacks for a classroom event (but they can bring "may contains", in that case my son just gets his own treat out of a treat bag).
He has been navigating school for almost 5 years now with no incidences. The teachers are aware, he is very careful, (when he was younger I checked out "party" snacks ahead of time for him...now he does the checking and decision making himself), and he has emergency procedures in place.
This might not be for everyone, but I think (opinion only) based on the other children I know with PA who's parents are not even aware of this website...what we do is similar to how many of children with PA handle this allergy.
Just make the decision that is right for you, but for us, at least, homeschooling is not a necessity. Many folks on this board homeschool, but I think for most there are other reasons they make that choice.
Kelly

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2006 - 1:03am
momfreed's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/19/2006 - 09:00

Those are great ideas. I'm going to look into cybercharter. I've never heard of that. You're right that the PA was not the only reason to homeschool. It was one of our initial reasons, but we enjoyed it, so we continued. Now, I have a new baby and the four of them together seem like too much for me right now.
My husband is a teacher in the SD. We are meeting with the principal tomorrow. We have written down a list of things to discuss with him, but my husband said (after I read to him from these forums) that if they seem in any way unwilling, we will just keep him home. Which, in a way, feels better to me. Maybe I'll just have to come up with a new game plan for school at home.
Thank you for your ideas.
Caryn

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