Hi, new here

Posted on: Sat, 07/13/2002 - 7:10am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

pHi! Just wanted to introduce myself. My 3 1/2 year old DD is peanut allergic. We found out last fourth of July when she ate a peanut cookie and broke out in hives around her mouth. It is great to have found this site and read that other moms (and dads!) are going through the same thing as me. I try to be very very very careful with what she eats, but it is an allergy that consumes me at times and can be depressing! I also have a 2 year old DD that we don't know y et if she is allergic - our allergist said to have her tested at 3 years of age. Well, just wanted to say hello and look forward to chatting with everyone. Wish none of us had to be here, but what can we do!/p
pDiane/p

Posted on: Mon, 07/15/2002 - 9:13am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

welcome diane and you right we wish we dident have to be here but in our situation it is a god thing to have somany people sharing the same proplems and give eatch ohter so mutch help and advice i think in our situation it is the best place to be chek out all the ohter boards we are having here they could come in handy some times so all the best to you and again wellcome
Thomas and Marina

Posted on: Mon, 07/15/2002 - 9:34am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Thanks for the welcome Thomas and Marina! I don't know what people did 15 or 20 years ago before we had the internet to be connected with and find out all the wonderful and valuable information! I have surfed so many of the boards already and it is wonderful to have so much information and communications so readily at hand!!!
Best of luck to all of us!
Diane

Posted on: Tue, 02/07/2006 - 8:01pm
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Joined: 03/26/2002 - 09:00

Hi, good news that your son can eat well cooked eggs.
There is a good chance your son will grow out of his egg allergy when he is older.
As for the egg reactions, sometimes the frosting has a lot of egg white (for e.g) or a cake that is soft and not well cooked, as this is enough to cause a reaction to someoen who is sensitive to egg.
Plain sponge cake , well cooked, are the best things to aim for.
hope this helps,
sarah

Posted on: Tue, 02/07/2006 - 10:22pm
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Joined: 03/15/2004 - 09:00

Welcome...I, too, am from Minnesota. I understand the fear that you are feeling. My son was 2 when he was officially diagnosed with soy and peanut allergy. Keep educating yourself as much as possible. I have found that you will find your comfort level with food, but it does take time. I am not familiar with the egg allergy, but there are lots of people on this Board who are so keep reading and asking questions.
Also keep educating your husband. My husband did not understand the seriousness of the allergy in the beginning. He did not know better. After a few trips to the ER, we both quickly understood that we must always be on guard, especially when visiting friends and relatives.
Dealing with the allergy gets easier, because it becames part of your routine. However, I still worry, still get upset, and still have days that are difficult. That is why I use this Board...to get support and information.
Good luck and take care,
Donna

Posted on: Wed, 02/08/2006 - 1:22am
bethc's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

I, too, have been obsessed. Okay, I'm still pretty obsessed after 10 months of understanding how serious this is. But it has gotten better, and people say it continues to get better. And my husband took a while to understand it. He thought I was kind of overly worried at first, but I kept telling him things I learned, like how many people die of this annually, and one night he said, "It's really that serious?" And after that he understood and has been a good ally in this. That's great that you get to meet with a dietician, especially since you're dealing with an egg allergy.

Posted on: Tue, 02/07/2006 - 8:01pm
williamsmummy's picture
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Joined: 03/26/2002 - 09:00

Hi, good news that your son can eat well cooked eggs.
There is a good chance your son will grow out of his egg allergy when he is older.
As for the egg reactions, sometimes the frosting has a lot of egg white (for e.g) or a cake that is soft and not well cooked, as this is enough to cause a reaction to someoen who is sensitive to egg.
Plain sponge cake , well cooked, are the best things to aim for.
hope this helps,
sarah

Posted on: Tue, 02/07/2006 - 10:22pm
notnutty's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2004 - 09:00

Welcome...I, too, am from Minnesota. I understand the fear that you are feeling. My son was 2 when he was officially diagnosed with soy and peanut allergy. Keep educating yourself as much as possible. I have found that you will find your comfort level with food, but it does take time. I am not familiar with the egg allergy, but there are lots of people on this Board who are so keep reading and asking questions.
Also keep educating your husband. My husband did not understand the seriousness of the allergy in the beginning. He did not know better. After a few trips to the ER, we both quickly understood that we must always be on guard, especially when visiting friends and relatives.
Dealing with the allergy gets easier, because it becames part of your routine. However, I still worry, still get upset, and still have days that are difficult. That is why I use this Board...to get support and information.
Good luck and take care,
Donna

Posted on: Wed, 02/08/2006 - 1:22am
bethc's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

I, too, have been obsessed. Okay, I'm still pretty obsessed after 10 months of understanding how serious this is. But it has gotten better, and people say it continues to get better. And my husband took a while to understand it. He thought I was kind of overly worried at first, but I kept telling him things I learned, like how many people die of this annually, and one night he said, "It's really that serious?" And after that he understood and has been a good ally in this. That's great that you get to meet with a dietician, especially since you're dealing with an egg allergy.

Posted on: Mon, 02/09/2009 - 11:26pm
scmom24's picture
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Joined: 02/04/2009 - 06:05

I'm thinking that if he tested positive on both the scratch test and the RAST that he is probably allergic to the peanuts. I'm finding out little by little as I go that just because my son hasn't reacted to something doesn't mean he wont. We had our first reaction around Christmas when he ate a half a cookie. I too have older children and my oldest daughter, 9, lived on PB&J too. He never showed a sign of a reaction. Now, since the reaction at Christmas we finally got a PA confirmation about a week ago and I was shocked. Since I'm only a week into this I don't have a lot of answers, but I would think from what you are saying that he is indead allergic. Also, though the reaction to the cake was most likely the eggs peanuts could play into it. I've been reading about a lot of xcontamination with bakery items. Needless to say I'm going to be baking my own cakes from now on. :) Sorry I don't have more advice, but I do understand and hope you find the answers you need.

Posted on: Fri, 03/13/2009 - 5:44am
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Joined: 02/04/2009 - 12:38

My son sees Dr. Li from Mt. Sinai and I talked to her about false positives in February. She said it's true that kids can have false positives on the RAST test but usually only if the levels are pretty low. Food challenges are the most accurate, she said, but also the most dangerous.
And to make things more confusing, just because a kid is allergic to a food doesn't mean they will have a reaction. I certainly would not test it out with a high level, but my son was allergic to Sesame seeds in addition to peanuts and some tree nuts. He never reacted to Sesame seeds. He's had hummus since he was a year old. But, his RAST level was low on sesame seeds.
I understand your fears which is why we travel across the U.S. to see Dr. Li in NY. She has created an herbal formula that blocks anaphylaxis associated with peanut allergy. She is doing human trials right now at Mt. Sinai. The formula is called FAHF-2. It is VERY promising. Since we've started to see her, my son's allergy levels have dropped dramatically. You can see her research and article about her on the Web. Her name is Dr. Xui-Min Li.

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