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Posted on: Thu, 05/08/2003 - 3:02am
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

I haven`t been on these boards in awhile. It is so interesting to me how Girl Scouts ALWAYS seems to come up as far as not accomodating pa. People who have been on these boards for awhile probably remember my threads about Girl Scouts. I personally think that the Girl Scout promise is a bunch of meaningless words, and their policies on disabilities should state "we accomodate disabilities unless it is a little bit inconvenient", because that is the truth.
But back to the school thing, I question whether this girl is truly hypoglycemic. If so, the treatment for a low blood sugar is SUGAR such as orange juice. When a diabetic has an insulin reaction (which means a low blood sugar due to the insulin), do they give peanut butter? No, they give orange juice. I agree that you should not have to fight it out with this woman who is willing to risk your child`s life so that she doesn`t have to spend a minute or two cutting up apples. This is not a rational human being. If I were in your shoes, I would take it to the school nurse. She is required by law to accomodate the pa, and having hypoglycemic child in the class doesn`t make it okay to break the law. There are many solutions to the hypoglycemic problem where both children can be accomodated. Peanut butter is the only one that doesn`t accomodate both children. At our school, we only have a nurse for five hours a week, but I am sure that if I went to her with something like this she would not allow it. If nothing else, it is a liability for the school. If they don`t care about your child`s safety, they might care that they are putting themselves at risk if your child has a reaction due to the peanut butter that could have been substituted for another snack where the hypoglycemic child would have been just as safe. If I were you I would take it to the school nurse. If that doesn`t work, I would write a letter to the principal. If that doesn`t work I would get your allergist to write a letter.
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited May 08, 2003).]

Posted on: Thu, 05/08/2003 - 3:39am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Thanks, Carefulmom- I couldn't figure out how to express that niggling doubt without sounding offensive... But my experience in dealing with diabetes has been that the term "hypoglycemic" is not one which is very often used. It just isn't possible for most people to experience "hypoglycemia" without an underlying problem with bloodsugar regulation (ie- "diabetes" or at least leanings into Type II)... it also seems to me very odd that peanut butter would be used as a rescue food- I've never seen this done, personally, by ANY of the diabetics I have ever known. Some of them DO use it as a management food, and it is very valuable in terms of regulating blood sugar over many hours. (But for the record, it isn't clear to me that soynut butter wouldn't be.) I was wondering if there is a reason why the term "hypoglycemic" was used instead of the medically preferred term "diabetes".
(I was once told by a diabetes educator that "hypoglycemic" just plain doesn't exist outside of "diabetes" and that most of the people who use it are those who are trying to be manipulative using a health problem they don't really have.... I was moderately offended by the statement at the time, but it came to mind right away as I read the original post.)
Maybe I am wrong about this- it has been about five years since I had to really think very hard or update my own education about blood glucose management, and certainly a lot can change in that time.m Maybe the term is back in vogue.

Posted on: Thu, 05/08/2003 - 4:33am
darthcleo's picture
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Joined: 11/08/2000 - 09:00

I am not an expert on any of this, but I do know my sister was medically diagnosed as hypoglycemic, and she is not diabetic of any kind.

Posted on: Thu, 05/08/2003 - 11:46am
Carefulmom's picture
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I`m with Corvallis Mom on this. That is exactly what I think. And the thing about going to the school nurse is I wonder if this child has any medical documentation of being hypoglycemic. The school nurse should know. Maybe the school nurse doesn`t even know about this. We happened to be at the pediatrician today, and I brought this up. He said hypoglycemia in children as a medical diagnosis (not associated with diabetes and insulin reactions) is somewhere between extrememly rare and non-existent. I just wonder if this child has any documentation of being "hypoglycemic".

Posted on: Fri, 05/09/2003 - 6:00am
virginia mom's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2003 - 09:00

Believe me, the school nurse knows all about the other girl's low blood sugar. The mother had all sorts of tests run and her daughter does not have diabetes, just low blood sugar. This mother is VERY vocal and does not want her daughter to be sent to the clinic when eating her peanut butter snack because of my daughter's allergy. Her attitude is "since this is your daughter's "problem" why should my daughter be separated from the class during snack time? As for the Girl Scouts, I think that their position of allowing the other troop to be insensitive to the needs of these two girls with the PA is wrong. I've emailed the GS council, asking what their position will be with regard to future events. Will this happen again that our troop will not be able to do things if peanut products are in use? It does fly in the face of the GS Law, and if that is the case, then the Girl Scouts are more of a sorority that can exclude girls because of things beyond their control. I'm also wondering if the Girl Scouts receive any federal funding for their organization. If that is so, then wouldn't they be going against the Americans with Disabilities Act that prohibits discriminations to individuals with medical conditions that can not be controlled? At this point, I just don't know. As for my Daisy troop, I have found a beautiful park with a bridge, where they will do their bridging. I might even call the newspaper to come and take a picture - I'm going to try and make lemonade out of a lemon situation.

Posted on: Fri, 05/09/2003 - 6:23am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I am sorry for the horrible situation she's placing you in.... it sounds like she wants her daughter to have a problem that she doesn't really... (JMO) and so the child's physicians have finally told her *something* that is relatively harmless...
or at least it would be if it weren't for YOUR child's very real problem and this other parents' general demeanor! (Arrrghhhh)
Good for you! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Happy brownie-ing to your lovely little girl!

Posted on: Fri, 05/09/2003 - 9:41am
Yonit's picture
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Joined: 06/24/2002 - 09:00

Would Sunbutter serve the same purpose for stabalizing low blood sugar? If so, order a jar for her! IMHO it is soooo much like PB in taste and texture, that perhaps she'd be satisfied using it.

Posted on: Fri, 05/09/2003 - 10:33am
virginia mom's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2003 - 09:00

At this point, I think the mother would throw the jar of Sunbutter at me! Thank you for the suggestion though - It's nice to know that there are other products that will give her the same boost in blood sugar and yet keep my daughter safe. Maybe if I can compile a list of alternative snacks and give it to the school nurse - an impartial third party - the mother will be more open to the other options.

Posted on: Fri, 05/09/2003 - 10:45am
virginia mom's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2003 - 09:00

I just saw "Chicago's" questions about why the school is not getting more involved with the low blood sugar vs. PA problem. The school has been very clear about no peanuts in the classroom and, until now, the low blood sugar mother was fine with it. The problem is that the low blood sugar issue did not come up until March of this year. Since that time, this mother has been getting more and more sensitive about the restrictions put on her daughter's peanut butter snacks at school (i.e. being in the clinic). It was when I brought up the no peanuts during the GS meeting that she blew up. She was willing to play the "no peanut" game with the school, but when it comes to extracurricular activities such as GS where she is a "leader" then she feels that as an authority figure she can refuse to accommodate my daughter - after all, who's going to stop her? The GS council has backed off the issue.

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