Hello there

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 6:14pm
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Tom
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Just wanted to introduce myself and tell a bit of my story. I'm Tom, and I've had PA all my life. Tomorrow is actually my birthday, and I'll be 34. I haven't had a reaction in about 5 years.

I can remember the day my mother figured it out clearly, even though I was about 3 years old. We had peas as part of our meal for dinner, and I had a mild reaction. This led us to the Dr who prick tested me and confirmed the allergies. Peanuts, peas, and generally legumes. I also had problems with exzema when I was younger, and some animal allergies. The doctors always suggested to my parents that it was something I might outgrow later in life, but I can testify that this theory never came true.

I've never had extensive testing done, so I don't know any numbers or degrees. But I can tell you that I don't usually react unless I ingest peanuts. But when I do I get immediate swelling, breathing problems, and stomach cramps. I don't have problems with residue or breathing, usually.

I have poked around on the site and it's heartbreaking to read some of the stories of parents with children who have PA. I always thought I had it bad, but to read the stories of children who get reactions from touch, or even the smell of peanuts, I see I didn't have it so bad.

My biggest pet peeve is with the public in general. Most people just don't get it when you say you're allergic to peanuts. And when you explain the consequences are death, they try to laugh it off. This really bothers me, and I'm constantly trying to educate people and explain the best I can about the allergy. It's an uphill battle, though, and it angers me that people are so callous about a medical condition that threatens my life.

I am here to tell you that you can live your life in a relatively normal fashion and stay reactionless. As I said before, I've been reaction free for about the last 5 years. It takes a bit of work, but having lived with this problem so long, it becomes 2nd nature. I figure the best offense is a good defense, and I'm constantly thinking defensively when it comes to food. Thankfully, i've developed a good sense of peanut smell and that comes in handy. But first and foremost I always ask when not sure. Read labels, pay attention to what you're eating. Most of the time I try to steer clear of baked goods, since you can never tell what is in there. I think most importantly, I know what the consequences are if I do get a reaction, and I take responsibility solely for protecting myself and keeping myself alive. And it's been that way since I can remember.

I also think it's important to realize that most people don't know, don't care, and aren't looking out for you. As I said, people aren't real sympathetic to the pa sitaution. So you've got to take control. Like it or not, I am in the minority and it's up to me to know my limits and be on the lookout at all times. I don't like pushing the allergy off on others and asking the majority to change their lives for me. So I try to take responsibility most occasions. There are some circumstances where I can't do it myself, though, and I've got no problem making my pa needs known to those that it affects. I like going to baseball and football games a lot. Unfortunately people like to eat peanuts at these events, and like to throw the shells everywhere. While it's dangerous to me, and because of this I can't always go to these games, I have never thought it was fair to ask the whole stadium to stop eating a food that doesn't bother them. I know my limits and avoiding that problem means staying alive, which is a lot more important than going to the games.

So anway, just wanted to say hi, give my story, and there it is. Thanks.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 8:12pm
williamsmummy's picture
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happy birthday tomorrow Tom, welcome to this site.
sarah

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 11:29pm
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Anonymous (not verified)

Hey Tom.... [url="http://www.ibiblio.org/team/fun/birthday/birthday.mid"]http://www.ibiblio.org/team/fun/birthday/birthday.mid[/url]
I'm an adult with peanut and sesame seed allergy. Developed them as an adult. I keep my home free of my allergens - although we do have *may contain* foods in the house, I don't eat them.
I think it's great that you took the time to post. For parents of kids with food allergies - it's always great to hear from an adult that grew up with it.
Make sure you check out the Manufacturer's Forum, and Peanut Free Businesses. You might find some companies that you didn't know about. And everybody deserves a little treat every now and then. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
Gotta ask you a question. Do you carry around an epi-pen? Those of us with son's that have allergies worry about when they are older - will they always carry their epi-pens.

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 12:13am
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Hi Tom, Welcome - and happy birthday! There are quite a few grown-ups here on the boards. Some, like you, have had it their entire lives and others, like Annamarie and me, are adult onset. I have a lot to learn so any tips you share on how you live with PA will be appreciated.
You might also check out FAAN's web site, [url="http://www.foodallergy.org."]www.foodallergy.org.[/url]
Cheers,
Adele

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 4:37am
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Tom
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I carry an epi pen, but not on me all the time. Usually it's either in my briefcase/bag, or in my vehicle. I've never had to use the pen, I thank God. The last reaction I had, I didn't happen to have one with me at the time, so I did the Benadryl thing which worked just as well. The worst reaction I ever had when I was a kid I had to go to a clinic and get an adrenlyn shot. Honestly, I feel comfortable enough with myself that I don't carry one on me, I try to rely on my self taught screening mostly. But I do like to keep one handy just in case.
Thanks everyone!

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 8:16am
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Hi Tom,
I am adult onset pa (6 years ago when I was 20). I just wanted to echo your comment about people not taking the 'medical condition' seriously. This is something that really bothers me, people making jokes about pa etc. I don't mind if it is someone close to me who I know takes it seriously making a joke or something, but when it is other people it really annoys me. If you had some other condition (eg some kind of heart condition) which could be potentially fatal, people wouldn't dare make jokes or make light of it, but for some reason food allergies are considered fair game.
Grrrr. Sometimes you just need to 'vent' [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Anyway, welcome. I better get back to work.
Michelle

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 10:39am
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b]I carry an epi pen, but not on me all the time. Usually it's either in my briefcase/bag, or in my vehicle. I've never had to use the pen, I thank God. The last reaction I had, I didn't happen to have one with me at the time, so I did the Benadryl thing which worked just as well. The worst reaction I ever had when I was a kid I had to go to a clinic and get an adrenlyn shot. Honestly, I feel comfortable enough with myself that I don't carry one on me, I try to rely on my self taught screening mostly. But I do like to keep one handy just in case.
[/b]
Welcome, but I have to say that I take my sons LTFA allergies [i]seriously[/i]. I want other people to as well. The epipen is always carried on my person and he carries his own. Always. I'm not offering advice as to at what age, just our own personal situation.
By "adrenlyn" do you mean epinephrine?

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 10:40am
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by the way, do you wear a medical alert identification?

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 12:41pm
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Tom
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
Welcome, but I have to say that I take my sons LTFA allergies [i]seriously[/i]. I want other people to as well. The epipen is always carried on my person and he carries his own. Always. I'm not offering advice as to at what age, just our own personal situation.
By "adrenlyn" do you mean epinephrine?
[/b]
What is LFTA, and no it was an adrenaline shot. Which is basically the same thing. And no to the medical alert bracelet. And as I said, I carry an epi pen both in my bag and vehicle, both of which I am never far away from.
And I too take my allergy seriously. Deathly serious.

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 4:58pm
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[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000505.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000505.html[/url]
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000402.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000402.html[/url]
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000467.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000467.html[/url]
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/001331.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/001331.html[/url]

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 5:15pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b] What is LFTA, and no it was an adrenaline shot. [/b]
Life Threatening Food Allergy.
Quote:[b]Which is basically the same thing. And no to the medical alert bracelet. And as I said, I carry an epi pen both in my bag and vehicle, both of which I am never far away from.
[/b]
"Far" when one is in the grip of a reaction, can be a relative term. If my child is incoherent, unconscious, unable to speak for himself, or impaired due to an allergic anaphylactic reaction, I want what may save his life accessible. To him. [i]Or to those who may save his life if he cannot.[/i] Currently, he is always in a situation where there is a [i]backup[/i] as well. Very soon, I am considering purchasing a device that would allow him to carry *two*.
May I ask why you do not wear a medical alert identification? In addition to other wording, my childs medical alert identification, which he wears in a conspicuous and among one of the expected places one might find one, states: "Carries Epinephrine".
By the way, his medic alert identification looks fantastic. I'm almost afraid it looks *too good*. He's never anywhere without it. It carries an obvious symbol.

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 1:03am
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Happy birthday, Tom!
I too want to urge you to always carry your Epi-pen. Even though your self-management system has worked all these years, it's been my observation that it's like Russian Roulette and it really only takes that one time out of all the times you have eaten these past 34 years where you don't have as much time to get to your rescue medication as you had before. It also appears that adults have had fatal food reactions when they were eating spicy food which probably masked their usual sense of smell that they'd been able to rely on all those years. I think you posted in the "In Memory" thread and many of those coincidentally(?) were after eating a curry.
Sorry - there are a lot of mothers on this board [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] and we just have a tendency to want what we think is best for those with food allergies!
Take care!
------------------
Jana
[url="http://www.seattlefoodallergy.org"]www.seattlefoodallergy.org[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 1:16am
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I wanted to pipe in here with a comment. Tom, I'm an adult PA who also grew up with it since age 2. I have the very sensitive type of PA allergy (along with a tree nut allergy)...no traces, cross-contamination, peanut odor allowed. I get minor mystery hives many times a year, which I attribute to peanut residue and crumbs in places. I'm 31 and haven't had an ingestion reaction in 15 years! Yay to your five! Eric, also on the board, hasn't had one in over 25 years!
My comfort zone and how I deal with the allergy has changed over time. Of course growing up we were careful, but there was a lot we didn't know...hence accidental reactions. In my late teens and early 20's I realize I took risks I shouldn't have and didn't treat the allergy seriously enough. I still read ingredients on everything that went in my stomache, but ate out a lot in places that may have been risky...and I didn't carry an epi at all for a while. In my late 20's I became more vigalent, after I heard about a PA death. I came here last year, and since I've become a lot more careful, some would say tight-butted about my allergy. Some of the perspectives of the parents on this board has been very positive and useful for me, some haven't, but mostly I've gotten good insights. For instance, I carry 2 epis on my person at all times now and have 2 back-ups (in my car or in my house). I've had the anaphylactic reactions in the past, so seconds matter. I've also gotten the RAST IgE blood test to gauge my sensitivity. I think that's really important and I would urge you to get the tests just to have the score. For me, it told me I was still extremely sensitive and all my efforts to stay PA/TNA free have been worth it. Friends would question if I was still allergic since I hadn't had a reaction in so long...I felt validated in a way when I got my test results! I also will start wearing a medic alert bracelet (or necklace) when I travel for work and go out to eat. All my friends though, know about my allergy and where my epis are.
So, there will be some on here who will urge you to carry epis on your person, wear a medic alert, not eat bakery or may contains, and have a peanut free household. I think that advice is very positive and you should take it into consideration, not to take any offense to it (not that you have at all...I'm just saying...) You'll see as you read old and new posts that everyone on here deals with the allergy different and everyone has a different comfort zone. Many of the adults with PA have different attitudes than parents with PA children...and those new to the allergy have different attitudes than those who have been dealing with it for 10 years. We all learn from each other, take every post with a grain of (thoughtful salt, and learn from each other. This is a great place, welcome!
Adrienne
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 2:52am
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Quote:Originally posted by Jana R:
[b]Happy birthday, Tom!
I too want to urge you to always carry your Epi-pen. Even though your self-management system has worked all these years, it's been my observation that it's like Russian Roulette and it really only takes that one time out of all the times you have eaten these past 34 years where you don't have as much time to get to your rescue medication as you had before. It also appears that adults have had fatal food reactions when they were eating spicy food which probably masked their usual sense of smell that they'd been able to rely on all those years. I think you posted in the "In Memory" thread and many of those coincidentally(?) were after eating a curry.
Sorry - there are a lot of mothers on this board [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] and we just have a tendency to want what we think is best for those with food allergies!
[/b]
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
(no need to apologize for me, that wouldn't be the first time I've been called a "mother". [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] )
I've probably been called the "that nurse" too. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] I mean, it's a dirty job, [i]but somebody's gotta do it[/i]. KWIM? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
anywhooooooooooo I've noticed and maybe it's just me, that in society, men are often done the [i]disservice[/i] of "getting a pass" on certain things.
No advice, just me. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
edit: dan# smilie bracket things.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 25, 2006).]

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 2:52pm
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Tom
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Well, I certainly appreciate the concerns. I probably should have a medical alert thingy, I am guilty of that. But it just isn't practical for me to carry an epipen ON my person at all times. I do physical work at times and the pen would get destroyed or be rendered ineffective pretty quickly. Like I said, it's always in my bag/briefcase or in my car. And neither one is very far from me in risky situations. When we go out to eat, my wife carries one in her purse. That's probably as close as I can get. Not to sound callous, but my reactions don't happen unless I ingest the peanut or legume, and I am incredibly careful to avoid that. I am not touch sensitive, and I known my limits with smell. And I am not as sensitive as some others around the board. I know my limitations, I stick to what I know, and I think I do a damn fine job of avoiding reactions. I would never dream of eating curry, or chinese food, or anything that hasn't proven safe in the past. I read labels, ask about ingredients, etc. When in doubt, I avoid the food. It's mostly about being smart.
I can appreciate the concerns of the mothers on this board. Frankly I think children probably need better monitoring than adults. Especially with problems that arise from other children and the greater chances of exposure from peanuts and pb at schools. If I had a child with the problem I think I'd be the same way. A child can't stand up for themselves, and aren't really capable of screening like an adult. I applaud and sympathize with parents on here that have to deal with pa.
But I'm here to tell you, that as you grow in adulthood, you learn to avoid exposures and gaurd yourself. Mom can't be there your whole life, and if you don't figure out how to function day to day safely, you're not going to be around. Which is why I take it so seriously, and why I think I've been successful in taming the situation. Even an epipen isn't a gaurantee that a reaction won't kill you. You're better off learning to avoid situations so you never have to use an epi pen to begin with.
I am by no means advocating that others should live the same way I do. Like I said, I am not as sensitive as others on here. And frankly I kinda feel a little guilty for it. You should do whatever you need to keep yourself and your child safe. But I am telling you that it is possible to live reaction free, and learn to avoid situations, and not be a prisoner to peanut allergies. After 34 years, I think I'm there, and I lead a relatively normal life where I don't have to fear going anywhere, eating out, and having reactions.
That's all.

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 9:34pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b]A child can't stand up for themselves, and aren't really capable of screening like an adult. [/b]
Although I wouldn't depend or rely on it as a [i]mother[/i] to protect the safety of my children, my children, now ages 6 and 10, have been doing this (as a redundancy and practice for adulthood) for quite some time. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] And at times with uncanny perception, accuracy, and [i]diplomacy[/i]. (Don't know where they get the "diplomacy" from..... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img])
Quote:[b]But I'm here to tell you, that as you grow in adulthood, you learn to avoid exposures and gaurd yourself. Mom can't be there your whole life, and if you don't figure out how to function day to day safely, you're not going to be around.[/b]
You're preaching to the choir. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] I work in Critical Care. [i]An [b]adult[/b] Critical Care[/i]. Mistakes and [i]misfortune[/i], despite the best intentions, aren't limited to children. Not as statistical advice, but just as a personal and possibly skewed observation...........I've seen things [i]adults do[/i] that just.....just...........[i]make you shake your head[/i]. (and cringe). And at times, situations that are frequently "WHOOPS! HOW DID THAT HAPPEN--PROBABLY NEVER SAW IT COMMING" things as well.
but still, some things that might be......apparently [i]intentional[/i]. Or possibly with absolute disregard for personal (or other's) safety.
go figure. It can be a *strange* world.
Quote:[b]Which is why I take it so seriously, and why I think I've been successful in taming the situation. Even an epipen isn't a gaurantee that a reaction won't kill you. You're better off learning to avoid situations so you never have to use an epi pen to begin with.[/b]
It's my impression epipens were devised to attempt to afford potential remedy for the [i]unforseen[/i], you know, [i]despite the best planning[/i] and [i]avoidance[/i]. But hey, I could be wrong.....
Quote:[b]I am by no means advocating that others should live the same way I do.[/b]
noted. understood.
Quote:[b]But I am telling you that it is possible to live reaction free, and learn to avoid situations, and not be a prisoner to peanut allergies. After 34 years, I think I'm there, and I lead a relatively normal life where I don't have to fear going anywhere, eating out, and having reactions.
[/b]
My oldest leads a similiar life. At age 10. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I mean, relatively speaking as far as "normal" 10 year olds. I don't think a food allergy makes him "abnormal". Although I think, for a 10 year old, he leads a pretty exciting and interesting lifestyle. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
That said, he wouldn't dream of entering a place, for example, like a restaurant that had (or purposely put)peanuts and peanut shells all over the floor (and maybe everything else). Even with me. I mean, just off the top of my head. For him, it's a no-brainer. (for me, too). And he's used to much finer dining, anywhoooooooooooo. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] (hmmmmmmmmmm. from a mother's perspective, there just might be a silver lining there......... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img])
General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing my own personal, highly individual and possibly unique situation. I might way off. and possibly lacking in tact. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 9:46pm
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b] When we go out to eat, my wife carries one in her purse. That's probably as close as I can get. [/b]
Speaking of which, have you seen the lines at the women's bathrooms in some restaurants???? [i]Sheesh[/i]. (speaking as a woman) How long does it take, ladies?????
Quote:[b]Not to sound callous, but my reactions don't happen unless I ingest the peanut or legume, and I am incredibly careful to avoid that.[/b]
I'm wondering and since we don't get an opportunity very often around here to talk to other people in your situation (hi erik and nancy!!!!) [i]Does your wife consciously eliminate what you are allergic to from her own diet? [/i] Just wondering.
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/001331.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/001331.html[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 9:51pm
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[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum24/HTML/000015.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum24/HTML/000015.html[/url]
(theme from the twilight zone)....

Posted on: Thu, 01/26/2006 - 12:31am
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Tom
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear: I'm wondering and since we don't get an opportunity very often around here to talk to other people in your situation (hi erik and nancy!!!!) [i]Does your wife consciously eliminate what you are allergic to from her own diet? [/i] Just wondering.
Yes. And every girlfriend I've ever had, as well. Like I said, I've been doing this successfully for 34 years.
Quote:It's my impression epipens were devised to attempt to afford potential remedy for the unforseen, you know, despite the best planning and avoidance. But hey, I could be wrong.....
Which is why I keep one close by. And I've never had to use one.
[This message has been edited by Tom (edited January 26, 2006).]

Posted on: Thu, 01/26/2006 - 1:14am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Hi again.
In case you ever get to the point where you decide you do want to carry around an epi-pen, there are a lot of good carriers available. My youngest wears an e-belt by zonii It can withstand up to 1000 lbs. of outside force. (Chances are no matter what your job is, you don't get hit by more then that. If you do - anaphylaxis is not your only concern. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ) There are other carriers that are probably more comfortable for adults. The protectube can hang from a belt or belt loop. I'm not sure exactly how strong it is, but an e-mail or call to the company and you could find out.
Not lecturing - just letting you know that there are safe options out there, if you ever want them. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 01/26/2006 - 3:36pm
Tom's picture
Tom
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Quote:Originally posted by AnnaMarie:
[b]Hi again.
In case you ever get to the point where you decide you do want to carry around an epi-pen, there are a lot of good carriers available. My youngest wears an e-belt by zonii It can withstand up to 1000 lbs. of outside force. (Chances are no matter what your job is, you don't get hit by more then that. If you do - anaphylaxis is not your only concern. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ) There are other carriers that are probably more comfortable for adults. The protectube can hang from a belt or belt loop. I'm not sure exactly how strong it is, but an e-mail or call to the company and you could find out.
Not lecturing - just letting you know that there are safe options out there, if you ever want them. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img][/b]
Thanks!
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Tue, 01/31/2006 - 4:14pm
Tom's picture
Tom
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Mommabear will be happy to learn I bought not one, but 2 medic alert dog tags to wear on a necklace and keep on my keychain. I also renewed my epi pen perscriptions this week and now have an epi pen in about 4 places around me at all times. Carrying one on my person isn't going to happen, though.
It would be nice if someone could come up with a watch or bracelet that had an injection in it instead of that pen. You could just hit the top of it or push a button and it would eject. There's only .3mls in there anyway. Something smaller that you could put in a secret bat-compartment on your utility belt, etc.

Posted on: Tue, 01/31/2006 - 4:56pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
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You're in MI, huh? You are REALLY a night owl, Tom!
I am usually the only one on the boards so late... west coastie here, so it isn't SOOOO late for me.
Glad to hear you're wearing ID... its the Mom in me... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 1:36am
Jana R's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b]
It would be nice if someone could come up with a watch or bracelet that had an injection in it instead of that pen. You could just hit the top of it or push a button and it would eject. There's only .3mls in there anyway. Something smaller that you could put in a secret bat-compartment on your utility belt, etc.[/b]
I'm anxiously awaiting the marketing of Intelliject's credit-card sized auto injector! Here's a discussion about it:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/005558.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/005558.html[/url]
A few years ago I heard about sub-lingual epinephrine but I haven't heard anything recently - I think that would have to be more convenient to carry at all times as well.
------------------
Jana
[url="http://www.seattlefoodallergy.org"]www.seattlefoodallergy.org[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 3:45am
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b]Mommabear will be happy to learn I bought not one, but 2 medic alert dog tags to wear on a necklace and keep on my keychain. [/b]
platinum? gold? any "bling"?? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] My oldest loves "cuban" curb chains.........I saw one in platinum and one in white gold this last holiday. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] I was also thinking "there might even be a way to make room for a small Asscher cut diamond somewhere on a medic alert portion".....
He likes "gold gold" and I thought, "OOO. if it's gold tone, a Assher cut diamond in a topaz hue." [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 6:47am
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b]Mommabear will be happy to learn I bought not one, but 2 medic alert dog tags to wear on a necklace and keep on my keychain. I also renewed my epi pen perscriptions this week and now have an epi pen in about 4 places around me at all times. Carrying one on my person isn't going to happen, though.
It would be nice if someone could come up with a watch or bracelet that had an injection in it instead of that pen. You could just hit the top of it or push a button and it would eject. There's only .3mls in there anyway. Something smaller that you could put in a secret bat-compartment on your utility belt, etc.[/b]
yay!
you might also want to consider putting some liquid benadryl with the epi...I have a puch thing that holds 2 epis and a small thing of benadryl liquid, then a handful of spare liquicaps, along with a card that has directions on how to use the epi, who I am, who my emergency contact is, and to call 911 and tell them that I'm having an anaphylactic reaction to a peanut/nut-food item.
Adrienne :-)
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 12:49pm
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Tom
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
platinum? gold? any "bling"?? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] My oldest loves "cuban" curb chains.........I saw one in platinum and one in white gold this last holiday. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] I was also thinking "there might even be a way to make room for a small Asscher cut diamond somewhere on a medic alert portion".....
He likes "gold gold" and I thought, "OOO. if it's gold tone, a Assher cut diamond in a topaz hue." [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img][/b]
Nah, they are just stainless steel dog tags. One for my keys, one for my necklace. They are very fashionable, though.
What is liquid benadryl? Is it different from benadryl capsules?

Posted on: Thu, 02/02/2006 - 5:06am
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Tom, you shouldn't leave your epi in the car. The epinephrine *and* the trigger mechanism are sensitive to temperature changes, especially extremes. That's why it's best carried with you.
ygg

Posted on: Thu, 02/02/2006 - 6:15am
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b]
Nah, they are just stainless steel dog tags. One for my keys, one for my necklace. They are very fashionable, though.
What is liquid benadryl? Is it different from benadryl capsules?[/b]
yup, it's different. There's no wait time for the sugary outer coating to dissolve and release the medicine.
here are my back-up liquidgels:
[url="http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=11388&catid=12203&trx=PLST-0-SRCH&trxp1=12203&trxp2=11388&trxp3=1&trxp4=0&btrx=BUY-PLST-0-SRCH"]http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.a...BUY-PLST-0-SRCH[/url]
then the liquid:
[url="http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=11073&catid=12203&trx=PLST-0-SRCH&trxp1=12203&trxp2=11073&trxp3=1&trxp4=0&btrx=BUY-PLST-0-SRCH"]http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.a...BUY-PLST-0-SRCH[/url]
and finally fast melts:
[url="http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=11386&catid=12203&trx=PLST-0-SRCH&trxp1=12203&trxp2=11386&trxp3=1&trxp4=0&btrx=BUY-PLST-0-SRCH"]http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.a...BUY-PLST-0-SRCH[/url]
since you have said that Benadryl usually works, these methods are much quicker, especially the liquid...
Adrienne :-)
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 8:12pm
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happy birthday tomorrow Tom, welcome to this site.
sarah

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 11:29pm
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Anonymous (not verified)

Hey Tom.... [url="http://www.ibiblio.org/team/fun/birthday/birthday.mid"]http://www.ibiblio.org/team/fun/birthday/birthday.mid[/url]
I'm an adult with peanut and sesame seed allergy. Developed them as an adult. I keep my home free of my allergens - although we do have *may contain* foods in the house, I don't eat them.
I think it's great that you took the time to post. For parents of kids with food allergies - it's always great to hear from an adult that grew up with it.
Make sure you check out the Manufacturer's Forum, and Peanut Free Businesses. You might find some companies that you didn't know about. And everybody deserves a little treat every now and then. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
Gotta ask you a question. Do you carry around an epi-pen? Those of us with son's that have allergies worry about when they are older - will they always carry their epi-pens.

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 12:13am
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Hi Tom, Welcome - and happy birthday! There are quite a few grown-ups here on the boards. Some, like you, have had it their entire lives and others, like Annamarie and me, are adult onset. I have a lot to learn so any tips you share on how you live with PA will be appreciated.
You might also check out FAAN's web site, [url="http://www.foodallergy.org."]www.foodallergy.org.[/url]
Cheers,
Adele

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 4:37am
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Tom
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I carry an epi pen, but not on me all the time. Usually it's either in my briefcase/bag, or in my vehicle. I've never had to use the pen, I thank God. The last reaction I had, I didn't happen to have one with me at the time, so I did the Benadryl thing which worked just as well. The worst reaction I ever had when I was a kid I had to go to a clinic and get an adrenlyn shot. Honestly, I feel comfortable enough with myself that I don't carry one on me, I try to rely on my self taught screening mostly. But I do like to keep one handy just in case.
Thanks everyone!

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 8:16am
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Hi Tom,
I am adult onset pa (6 years ago when I was 20). I just wanted to echo your comment about people not taking the 'medical condition' seriously. This is something that really bothers me, people making jokes about pa etc. I don't mind if it is someone close to me who I know takes it seriously making a joke or something, but when it is other people it really annoys me. If you had some other condition (eg some kind of heart condition) which could be potentially fatal, people wouldn't dare make jokes or make light of it, but for some reason food allergies are considered fair game.
Grrrr. Sometimes you just need to 'vent' [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Anyway, welcome. I better get back to work.
Michelle

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 10:39am
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b]I carry an epi pen, but not on me all the time. Usually it's either in my briefcase/bag, or in my vehicle. I've never had to use the pen, I thank God. The last reaction I had, I didn't happen to have one with me at the time, so I did the Benadryl thing which worked just as well. The worst reaction I ever had when I was a kid I had to go to a clinic and get an adrenlyn shot. Honestly, I feel comfortable enough with myself that I don't carry one on me, I try to rely on my self taught screening mostly. But I do like to keep one handy just in case.
[/b]
Welcome, but I have to say that I take my sons LTFA allergies [i]seriously[/i]. I want other people to as well. The epipen is always carried on my person and he carries his own. Always. I'm not offering advice as to at what age, just our own personal situation.
By "adrenlyn" do you mean epinephrine?

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 10:40am
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by the way, do you wear a medical alert identification?

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 12:41pm
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Tom
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
Welcome, but I have to say that I take my sons LTFA allergies [i]seriously[/i]. I want other people to as well. The epipen is always carried on my person and he carries his own. Always. I'm not offering advice as to at what age, just our own personal situation.
By "adrenlyn" do you mean epinephrine?
[/b]
What is LFTA, and no it was an adrenaline shot. Which is basically the same thing. And no to the medical alert bracelet. And as I said, I carry an epi pen both in my bag and vehicle, both of which I am never far away from.
And I too take my allergy seriously. Deathly serious.

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 4:58pm
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[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000505.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000505.html[/url]
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000402.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000402.html[/url]
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000467.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000467.html[/url]
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/001331.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/001331.html[/url]

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 5:15pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b] What is LFTA, and no it was an adrenaline shot. [/b]
Life Threatening Food Allergy.
Quote:[b]Which is basically the same thing. And no to the medical alert bracelet. And as I said, I carry an epi pen both in my bag and vehicle, both of which I am never far away from.
[/b]
"Far" when one is in the grip of a reaction, can be a relative term. If my child is incoherent, unconscious, unable to speak for himself, or impaired due to an allergic anaphylactic reaction, I want what may save his life accessible. To him. [i]Or to those who may save his life if he cannot.[/i] Currently, he is always in a situation where there is a [i]backup[/i] as well. Very soon, I am considering purchasing a device that would allow him to carry *two*.
May I ask why you do not wear a medical alert identification? In addition to other wording, my childs medical alert identification, which he wears in a conspicuous and among one of the expected places one might find one, states: "Carries Epinephrine".
By the way, his medic alert identification looks fantastic. I'm almost afraid it looks *too good*. He's never anywhere without it. It carries an obvious symbol.

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 1:03am
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Happy birthday, Tom!
I too want to urge you to always carry your Epi-pen. Even though your self-management system has worked all these years, it's been my observation that it's like Russian Roulette and it really only takes that one time out of all the times you have eaten these past 34 years where you don't have as much time to get to your rescue medication as you had before. It also appears that adults have had fatal food reactions when they were eating spicy food which probably masked their usual sense of smell that they'd been able to rely on all those years. I think you posted in the "In Memory" thread and many of those coincidentally(?) were after eating a curry.
Sorry - there are a lot of mothers on this board [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] and we just have a tendency to want what we think is best for those with food allergies!
Take care!
------------------
Jana
[url="http://www.seattlefoodallergy.org"]www.seattlefoodallergy.org[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 1:16am
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I wanted to pipe in here with a comment. Tom, I'm an adult PA who also grew up with it since age 2. I have the very sensitive type of PA allergy (along with a tree nut allergy)...no traces, cross-contamination, peanut odor allowed. I get minor mystery hives many times a year, which I attribute to peanut residue and crumbs in places. I'm 31 and haven't had an ingestion reaction in 15 years! Yay to your five! Eric, also on the board, hasn't had one in over 25 years!
My comfort zone and how I deal with the allergy has changed over time. Of course growing up we were careful, but there was a lot we didn't know...hence accidental reactions. In my late teens and early 20's I realize I took risks I shouldn't have and didn't treat the allergy seriously enough. I still read ingredients on everything that went in my stomache, but ate out a lot in places that may have been risky...and I didn't carry an epi at all for a while. In my late 20's I became more vigalent, after I heard about a PA death. I came here last year, and since I've become a lot more careful, some would say tight-butted about my allergy. Some of the perspectives of the parents on this board has been very positive and useful for me, some haven't, but mostly I've gotten good insights. For instance, I carry 2 epis on my person at all times now and have 2 back-ups (in my car or in my house). I've had the anaphylactic reactions in the past, so seconds matter. I've also gotten the RAST IgE blood test to gauge my sensitivity. I think that's really important and I would urge you to get the tests just to have the score. For me, it told me I was still extremely sensitive and all my efforts to stay PA/TNA free have been worth it. Friends would question if I was still allergic since I hadn't had a reaction in so long...I felt validated in a way when I got my test results! I also will start wearing a medic alert bracelet (or necklace) when I travel for work and go out to eat. All my friends though, know about my allergy and where my epis are.
So, there will be some on here who will urge you to carry epis on your person, wear a medic alert, not eat bakery or may contains, and have a peanut free household. I think that advice is very positive and you should take it into consideration, not to take any offense to it (not that you have at all...I'm just saying...) You'll see as you read old and new posts that everyone on here deals with the allergy different and everyone has a different comfort zone. Many of the adults with PA have different attitudes than parents with PA children...and those new to the allergy have different attitudes than those who have been dealing with it for 10 years. We all learn from each other, take every post with a grain of (thoughtful salt, and learn from each other. This is a great place, welcome!
Adrienne
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 2:52am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Jana R:
[b]Happy birthday, Tom!
I too want to urge you to always carry your Epi-pen. Even though your self-management system has worked all these years, it's been my observation that it's like Russian Roulette and it really only takes that one time out of all the times you have eaten these past 34 years where you don't have as much time to get to your rescue medication as you had before. It also appears that adults have had fatal food reactions when they were eating spicy food which probably masked their usual sense of smell that they'd been able to rely on all those years. I think you posted in the "In Memory" thread and many of those coincidentally(?) were after eating a curry.
Sorry - there are a lot of mothers on this board [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] and we just have a tendency to want what we think is best for those with food allergies!
[/b]
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
(no need to apologize for me, that wouldn't be the first time I've been called a "mother". [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] )
I've probably been called the "that nurse" too. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] I mean, it's a dirty job, [i]but somebody's gotta do it[/i]. KWIM? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
anywhooooooooooo I've noticed and maybe it's just me, that in society, men are often done the [i]disservice[/i] of "getting a pass" on certain things.
No advice, just me. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
edit: dan# smilie bracket things.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 25, 2006).]

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 2:52pm
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Tom
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Well, I certainly appreciate the concerns. I probably should have a medical alert thingy, I am guilty of that. But it just isn't practical for me to carry an epipen ON my person at all times. I do physical work at times and the pen would get destroyed or be rendered ineffective pretty quickly. Like I said, it's always in my bag/briefcase or in my car. And neither one is very far from me in risky situations. When we go out to eat, my wife carries one in her purse. That's probably as close as I can get. Not to sound callous, but my reactions don't happen unless I ingest the peanut or legume, and I am incredibly careful to avoid that. I am not touch sensitive, and I known my limits with smell. And I am not as sensitive as some others around the board. I know my limitations, I stick to what I know, and I think I do a damn fine job of avoiding reactions. I would never dream of eating curry, or chinese food, or anything that hasn't proven safe in the past. I read labels, ask about ingredients, etc. When in doubt, I avoid the food. It's mostly about being smart.
I can appreciate the concerns of the mothers on this board. Frankly I think children probably need better monitoring than adults. Especially with problems that arise from other children and the greater chances of exposure from peanuts and pb at schools. If I had a child with the problem I think I'd be the same way. A child can't stand up for themselves, and aren't really capable of screening like an adult. I applaud and sympathize with parents on here that have to deal with pa.
But I'm here to tell you, that as you grow in adulthood, you learn to avoid exposures and gaurd yourself. Mom can't be there your whole life, and if you don't figure out how to function day to day safely, you're not going to be around. Which is why I take it so seriously, and why I think I've been successful in taming the situation. Even an epipen isn't a gaurantee that a reaction won't kill you. You're better off learning to avoid situations so you never have to use an epi pen to begin with.
I am by no means advocating that others should live the same way I do. Like I said, I am not as sensitive as others on here. And frankly I kinda feel a little guilty for it. You should do whatever you need to keep yourself and your child safe. But I am telling you that it is possible to live reaction free, and learn to avoid situations, and not be a prisoner to peanut allergies. After 34 years, I think I'm there, and I lead a relatively normal life where I don't have to fear going anywhere, eating out, and having reactions.
That's all.

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 9:34pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b]A child can't stand up for themselves, and aren't really capable of screening like an adult. [/b]
Although I wouldn't depend or rely on it as a [i]mother[/i] to protect the safety of my children, my children, now ages 6 and 10, have been doing this (as a redundancy and practice for adulthood) for quite some time. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] And at times with uncanny perception, accuracy, and [i]diplomacy[/i]. (Don't know where they get the "diplomacy" from..... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img])
Quote:[b]But I'm here to tell you, that as you grow in adulthood, you learn to avoid exposures and gaurd yourself. Mom can't be there your whole life, and if you don't figure out how to function day to day safely, you're not going to be around.[/b]
You're preaching to the choir. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] I work in Critical Care. [i]An [b]adult[/b] Critical Care[/i]. Mistakes and [i]misfortune[/i], despite the best intentions, aren't limited to children. Not as statistical advice, but just as a personal and possibly skewed observation...........I've seen things [i]adults do[/i] that just.....just...........[i]make you shake your head[/i]. (and cringe). And at times, situations that are frequently "WHOOPS! HOW DID THAT HAPPEN--PROBABLY NEVER SAW IT COMMING" things as well.
but still, some things that might be......apparently [i]intentional[/i]. Or possibly with absolute disregard for personal (or other's) safety.
go figure. It can be a *strange* world.
Quote:[b]Which is why I take it so seriously, and why I think I've been successful in taming the situation. Even an epipen isn't a gaurantee that a reaction won't kill you. You're better off learning to avoid situations so you never have to use an epi pen to begin with.[/b]
It's my impression epipens were devised to attempt to afford potential remedy for the [i]unforseen[/i], you know, [i]despite the best planning[/i] and [i]avoidance[/i]. But hey, I could be wrong.....
Quote:[b]I am by no means advocating that others should live the same way I do.[/b]
noted. understood.
Quote:[b]But I am telling you that it is possible to live reaction free, and learn to avoid situations, and not be a prisoner to peanut allergies. After 34 years, I think I'm there, and I lead a relatively normal life where I don't have to fear going anywhere, eating out, and having reactions.
[/b]
My oldest leads a similiar life. At age 10. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I mean, relatively speaking as far as "normal" 10 year olds. I don't think a food allergy makes him "abnormal". Although I think, for a 10 year old, he leads a pretty exciting and interesting lifestyle. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
That said, he wouldn't dream of entering a place, for example, like a restaurant that had (or purposely put)peanuts and peanut shells all over the floor (and maybe everything else). Even with me. I mean, just off the top of my head. For him, it's a no-brainer. (for me, too). And he's used to much finer dining, anywhoooooooooooo. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] (hmmmmmmmmmm. from a mother's perspective, there just might be a silver lining there......... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img])
General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing my own personal, highly individual and possibly unique situation. I might way off. and possibly lacking in tact. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 9:46pm
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Tom:
[b] When we go out to eat, my wife carries one in her purse. That's probably as close as I can get. [/b]
Speaking of which, have you seen the lines at the women's bathrooms in some restaurants???? [i]Sheesh[/i]. (speaking as a woman) How long does it take, ladies?????
Quote:[b]Not to sound callous, but my reactions don't happen unless I ingest the peanut or legume, and I am incredibly careful to avoid that.[/b]
I'm wondering and since we don't get an opportunity very often around here to talk to other people in your situation (hi erik and nancy!!!!) [i]Does your wife consciously eliminate what you are allergic to from her own diet? [/i] Just wondering.
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/001331.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/001331.html[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 9:51pm
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[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum24/HTML/000015.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum24/HTML/000015.html[/url]
(theme from the twilight zone)....

Posted on: Thu, 01/26/2006 - 12:31am
Tom's picture
Tom
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear: I'm wondering and since we don't get an opportunity very often around here to talk to other people in your situation (hi erik and nancy!!!!) [i]Does your wife consciously eliminate what you are allergic to from her own diet? [/i] Just wondering.
Yes. And every girlfriend I've ever had, as well. Like I said, I've been doing this successfully for 34 years.
Quote:It's my impression epipens were devised to attempt to afford potential remedy for the unforseen, you know, despite the best planning and avoidance. But hey, I could be wrong.....
Which is why I keep one close by. And I've never had to use one.
[This message has been edited by Tom (edited January 26, 2006).]

Posted on: Thu, 01/26/2006 - 1:14am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Hi again.
In case you ever get to the point where you decide you do want to carry around an epi-pen, there are a lot of good carriers available. My youngest wears an e-belt by zonii It can withstand up to 1000 lbs. of outside force. (Chances are no matter what your job is, you don't get hit by more then that. If you do - anaphylaxis is not your only concern. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ) There are other carriers that are probably more comfortable for adults. The protectube can hang from a belt or belt loop. I'm not sure exactly how strong it is, but an e-mail or call to the company and you could find out.
Not lecturing - just letting you know that there are safe options out there, if you ever want them. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 01/26/2006 - 3:36pm
Tom's picture
Tom
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Joined: 01/22/2006 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by AnnaMarie:
[b]Hi again.
In case you ever get to the point where you decide you do want to carry around an epi-pen, there are a lot of good carriers available. My youngest wears an e-belt by zonii It can withstand up to 1000 lbs. of outside force. (Chances are no matter what your job is, you don't get hit by more then that. If you do - anaphylaxis is not your only concern. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ) There are other carriers that are probably more comfortable for adults. The protectube can hang from a belt or belt loop. I'm not sure exactly how strong it is, but an e-mail or call to the company and you could find out.
Not lecturing - just letting you know that there are safe options out there, if you ever want them. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img][/b]
Thanks!
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Tue, 01/31/2006 - 4:14pm
Tom's picture
Tom
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Joined: 01/22/2006 - 09:00

Mommabear will be happy to learn I bought not one, but 2 medic alert dog tags to wear on a necklace and keep on my keychain. I also renewed my epi pen perscriptions this week and now have an epi pen in about 4 places around me at all times. Carrying one on my person isn't going to happen, though.
It would be nice if someone could come up with a watch or bracelet that had an injection in it instead of that pen. You could just hit the top of it or push a button and it would eject. There's only .3mls in there anyway. Something smaller that you could put in a secret bat-compartment on your utility belt, etc.

Posted on: Tue, 01/31/2006 - 4:56pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

You're in MI, huh? You are REALLY a night owl, Tom!
I am usually the only one on the boards so late... west coastie here, so it isn't SOOOO late for me.
Glad to hear you're wearing ID... its the Mom in me... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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