Having DS Retested for PA? Need some advice.

Posted on: Mon, 07/21/2003 - 12:21pm
e-mom's picture
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Joined: 04/23/2000 - 09:00

I just made an appointment for ds to be retested for pa.

His first and only test was at about 20 months and it was a skin test. He tested positive (the welt was the size of a quarter) to peanuts and tested negative to the other 8 (nuts and sesame).

I don't think I will have him skin tested as I am very nervous that I would be doing more harm than good. AND after doing a search on these boards about retesting for PA it seems like that is the right answer.

So, what to do Rast Test or Cap-Rast Test?

What's the difference?

Are there any false positives with these tests?

If the tests come back negative does that mean he is not allergic to peanuts anymore? (I can only hope)

Are there any other questions that I should ask the allergist?

I am also having ds #2 (age 3) tested for the first time (because he will be starting pre-school and I need to know if he will be safe to eat their snacks or should I pack his own).

Should I skip the skin test all together with him and just have Rast or Cap-Rast?

Posted on: Mon, 07/21/2003 - 6:35pm
wendysco's picture
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Joined: 05/03/2003 - 09:00

My 2 1/2 year old ds is PA, I just took my daughter in for what seem to be multiple food allergies and the allergist ordered RAST testing, did no skin testing. It sounds like she's going to use the skin testing to double check any negative results on the blood test(?). Or it was because my 17 mo old dd is VERY ucooperative for any medical exams. It's a hard call, perhaps do the blood test first, then maybe if negative do an oral challenge in the doctor's office. There is no right or wrong here,everyone is learning. As for false results I believe there is a thread on here about false negatives, perhaps that would give you some insight.If I can find it I'll raise it. Good luck with whatever you decide.

Posted on: Mon, 07/21/2003 - 10:57pm
e-mom's picture
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Joined: 04/23/2000 - 09:00

wendysco,
THANK YOU!!!!!
I thought that I just read something but I couldn't find it.
Now I'm even wondering if I should have any test done on pa ds at all?

Posted on: Tue, 07/22/2003 - 8:59am
nikky's picture
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Joined: 11/14/2000 - 09:00

My allergist said that the RAST test was conducted on a flat surface. The CAP-RAST was in the shape of a cap(hence the name). The CAP-RAST is supposed to be more sensitive because it covers more surface area of the blood vessels. She said its the newer of the two and does not even do RAST anymore. After my experience, however, I'm not sure we know enough about outgrowing this allergy yet. The 20% outgrowth study was just one study. I don't believe there was a long term aspect to it. Meaning, if you outgrow it and test negative, is there a chance later that you will resensitize? My allergist had this happen to one of her patients who outgrew her allegy. That's scary to me.

Posted on: Tue, 07/22/2003 - 9:10am
e-mom's picture
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Thank you Nikky. Your input definitely helps me.
I'm not expecting any miracles for ds to have outgrown his allergy. I'm not saying that he has it's just that he hasn't had any type of reaction, felt sick, etc., absolutely nothing since his first reaction at 17 months.
I know there are others on this board with the same scenario.
Anyone care to share their story?
Even if he tests negative with a blood test and tests negative to a skin test, I still wouldn't give him anything with peanuts in it. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] I would be too scared as well.
I think that I will only have the Cap-Rast test done on him as well as ds#2.
[This message has been edited by e-mom (edited July 22, 2003).]

Posted on: Tue, 07/22/2003 - 9:39am
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Joined: 05/06/2003 - 09:00

E-mom,
My dd was diagnosed at 18mos and was tested w/ a prick board. We just went back at 35mos, and they REFUSED to re-test her for peanuts, said you could have a challenge test done at big hospitals i.e. UNC or Duke, but the risks are so high, they don't recommend it. They will re-test her for pa at age 4. They said the odds are so slim that she'll outgrow it , EVEN THOUGH SHE'S BEEN TOTALLY PEANUT AVOIDANT since her first reaction at 18mos, not to think she'll outgrow it.
I would INSIST that they test your child for beans. My allergist didn't recommend it, I demanded it... my dd ended up having a Pinto Bean allergy too. Peanuts are beans afterall.
Angela

Posted on: Tue, 07/22/2003 - 11:07am
virginia mom's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2003 - 09:00

We've known about my daughter's PA for four years and have had three skin prick tests done in that time. The reaction on each successive test was significantly bigger - so much so that my allergist felt that the skin exposure may have been contributing to the severity. He said that he will not expose her again and to just assume that she will always have a severe allergy. Since the medical community still does not have all the facts about peanut allergy, I think my allergist felt that he inadvertently contributed to her higher scores. Who knows?

Posted on: Wed, 07/23/2003 - 12:56am
e-mom's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by angelahensley:
[b]I would INSIST that they test your child for beans. My allergist didn't recommend it, I demanded it... my dd ended up having a Pinto Bean allergy too. Peanuts are beans afterall.
Angela[/b]
Thank you Angela for your input. My ds (4 1/2) actually loves beans. He eats green beans, baked beans, and has eaten chili. He has absolutely no problems at all with these foods.
[This message has been edited by e-mom (edited July 23, 2003).]

Posted on: Wed, 07/23/2003 - 1:01am
e-mom's picture
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Joined: 04/23/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by virginia mom:
[b]We've known about my daughter's PA for four years and have had three skin prick tests done in that time. The reaction on each successive test was significantly bigger - so much so that my allergist felt that the skin exposure may have been contributing to the severity. He said that he will not expose her again and to just assume that she will always have a severe allergy. Since the medical community still does not have all the facts about peanut allergy, I think my allergist felt that he inadvertently contributed to her higher scores. Who knows?[/b]
Virginia Mom,
This is my biggest fear in having the skin tests done again. That's why I'm not going to have them done on pa ds#1.
I'm still not entirely sure for ds #2 (almost 3). He's never had any type of food reaction. I believe that I read that the skin tests were, in fact, the most accurate but I'm still not sure.

Posted on: Thu, 07/24/2003 - 7:26am
e-mom's picture
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Joined: 04/23/2000 - 09:00

Thank you all that have replied! Your input is greatly appreciated.

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