Has Your PA Child Had An Anaphylactic Reaction?

Posted on: Tue, 11/19/2002 - 5:58am
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Anonymous (not verified)

Surprisingly, I thought I had already raised this question a couple of years ago. Did a search and it didn't come up with it. So....

How many of us posting have PA children that have had an anaphylactic reaction?

The reason I'm asking, aside from simply learning more about people's experiences with PA is to try to understand discussion currently underway in the Schools thread. I do believe whether your child has had an anaphylactic reaction factors into things (sometimes). Perhaps not. Let's see.

Yes, Jesse has had two anaphylactic reactions. His last one was at the age of 2-1/2 where he almost died.

Many thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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Posted on: Tue, 11/19/2002 - 7:33am
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My DS has had 3 reactions that qualify as "anaphylactic" - 2 before we knew about his allergy, and one totally unrelated to his food allergies.
Thought it may help to say that his first 2 were to ingestion of PB.
[This message has been edited by Lam (edited November 19, 2002).]

Posted on: Tue, 11/19/2002 - 9:10am
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Anonymous (not verified)

Lam, you know me with my dazed and confused [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img] memory - what was the other anaphylactic reaction to? Was it the Huggies Pull-Ups thread that was going before? Please forgive my memory. I am always interested in other things that do cause anaphylaxis. For example, it was interesting for me to learn that another member here had a child that was anaphylactic to cats. I had never heard of that before.
I understand why you felt the need to explain your answer further, because I did the same thing. It's okay if people just want to answer yes or no and it's okay if they want to explain further. Just exploring something.
Many thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Tue, 11/19/2002 - 10:35am
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Cindy,
Your memory is just fine! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] Yes, it was the Huggies Pull Ups. I don't know why, but I feel badly about bringing that up sometimes - I guess because it wasn't PA related.
Why I clarified my answer - I just wanted to differentiate between anaphylaxis to contact or airborne as opposed to ingestion.
You've been asking a lot of questions of late - what's up?? If you don't mind my asking - you know my straightforwardness. (Is that a word?!?!?)

Posted on: Tue, 11/19/2002 - 10:52am
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Anonymous (not verified)

Lam, thank-you [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] So, my memory isn't completely shot to heck. I don't know why you would be embarrassed to say it was the Huggies. I think it's almost essential for people to know that there can be anaphylactic reactions to other things than peanut products (or the other major food allergens or bee/wasp stings). Seriously.
I'm having difficulty with the school (it would seem, as usual [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] ) and that's why I've raised a few questions. Then, to compliment or co-relate with those, Sue re-raised some of my older school questions that I had raised. So, if you check under Schools I have quite a few threads running but I think 3 of them are oldies.
I also finally got around to raising my next question re MKRuby's Mission Statement and raising the question from [url="http://www.allergicchild.com"]www.allergicchild.com[/url] that Nicole has given me permission to post here as she raises it on her website.
These two, under Living with PA, are just further exploration of members' children's reaction histories and I also think, for me, tied into the whole school thing that I'm encountering.
I know that I haven't changed my comfort zone and I haven't changed my requirements of the school, but there have just been a couple of things happen lately that have me exploring my comfort zone and how things do change as your PA child gets older.
And you know I love your straightforwardness (hey, you're THE teacher, you *should* know if that's a word - it would be in Cindy-speak [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] ) so not a problem.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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[This message has been edited by Cindy Spowart Cook (edited November 19, 2002).]

Posted on: Tue, 11/19/2002 - 1:37pm
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We have not had an anaphylactic reaction. Sadly, it seems many family and friends think our dd's PA is not very serious because of this. I often get the Oh, but she has never... kind of response when they think I am over the top with my brand loyalties and label reading and not allowing ice cream, well you know. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] becca
[This message has been edited by becca (edited November 19, 2002).]

Posted on: Tue, 11/19/2002 - 11:42pm
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Anonymous (not verified)

becca, take the information you get from here (and other sources) and use this to let your family and others know why you are "over the top" (if you will).
Because your daughter is young, if she can avoid peanut products and an anaphylactic reaction, she does have a 20% chance of outgrowing the allergy. It is my understanding that as soon as you have an anaphylactic reaction, that all goes out the window. So, by protecting your daughter in the same ways that those of us do that do have children that have had anaphylactic reactions, she may actually outgrow the allergy.
Aside from that, the strange thing about their comment about her never having an anaphylactic reaction is does she have to have one for people to understand that you are doing what you are doing to prevent one and prevent seeing your child almost die?
I completely understand where you're coming from and I also understand the comments you're getting. Unfortunately (or fortunately), we stopped getting those over the top comments after Jesse almost died. Even after his first anaphylactic reaction, because his Father didn't witness it (he was in denial), I still got comments from both his Father and my MIL (and probably others).
But no, after he almost died, people tend not to question my comfort zone anymore. Great, eh? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
I would just say something to that effect when you hear comments - what, would you like my daughter to have an anaphylactic reaction so that YOU can take her allergy seriously?
And you can also use the 20% chance of outgrowing if you avoid one thing also.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Wed, 11/20/2002 - 12:24am
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My son had 1 anaphylactic reaction at 2.5 years old. He was reacting to his first try of PBJ. We have, thankfully, not had any reactions since the first one. Hope this helps.
Kelly

Posted on: Wed, 11/20/2002 - 2:50am
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My DD had two anaphylactic reactions - the first when she was 2 1/2, before we knew she was allergic to peanuts, the second when she was 5, also peanuts, accidentally in her mouth, but not swallowed. Now she's almost 13, reaction-free for almost 7 years!
Both times severe swelling of the tongue and lips, eyes swollen, coughing and choking, hive and finally threw up. No seizures, though, thank goodness. But definitely within the terms of anaphylaxis. She has never reacted to smell or touch.

Posted on: Wed, 11/20/2002 - 5:21am
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I feel like a terrible mother but.........dd has had about 30 ( I think ) anaphylactic reactions. She is contact and airborne sensitive so we are keeping her at home. Almost all the time. I am tired and very frusterated.
The reactions, she gets hives, gets very shaky, upset stomache, throat swells shut, blisters in her mouth, at times blisters on her body, feels like she has the flu, and loses control of her bowels, can not walk.
And 'some people' still think I am a 'excitable mother', I think 'some people' need a lobotomy (sp?)!

Posted on: Wed, 11/20/2002 - 5:23am
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My son has had 1 reaction to ingestion that was catergorized 'anaphylactic'. That was his first reaction at around 1 1/2 years old. His second reaction happened when he was just shy of 2 years old,(to touching the crust of a PB&J sandwich); it compromised his breathing somewhat, but fell just short of doctors calling it anaphylactic.
I am sorry to hear that you are having trouble with the school. I hope some of these answers will help you find a solution to the situation that your child will be safe with and you will be comfortable with. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] HUGS for you!!
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Little Man's Momma
a*k*a Kendra
[This message has been edited by LilMansMom (edited November 20, 2002).]

Posted on: Wed, 11/20/2002 - 5:45am
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Anonymous (not verified)

Lilman's Mom, thank-you for your support re the school thing [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I really appreciate it.
Connielynn, since your child is smell and airborne sensitive, I don't think that you should feel guilty about the number of reactions that she has had. My soul, how can you possibly control a situation that severe?
Jesse has only been exposed to peanuts (at a circus - DUH to Mom here) in an airborne situation once and he was okay. His parents definitely weren't and we left at intermission. But, I'm not clear if he would be airborne sensitive the next time he is exposed.
The thing is, with him a peanut/nut free home and in a peanut free classroom at school, he really has the amount of chances he would come into contact with peanut products greatly reduced. I also believe (and this was discussed extensively in another thread) that because he takes a daily antihistamine for his environmental allergies that this may have helped him to avoid any contact reactions.
No, Connielynn, definitely don't beat yourself up. I can't even imagine what you're going through. How old is your child?
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Wed, 11/20/2002 - 12:13pm
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She is 12, this started when she was ten months old. I made cookies and like a good mom, I bought items thru a food coop. Cause they were healthier. Well she ate one small cookie and had hives so bad we almost went to the ER. Carried Benadryl with us everywhere after that. But when she was 2 1/2 she ate a reeses peanut butter egg. That is when we found out that Benadryl wasn't working great. But it was just hives not a full blown reaction.
Now though............she had a major reaction in WalMart this summer. Someone threw trash into our cart. She didn't touch the trash, but the trash touched other items and she touched them. It was terrible.
We got through Oct and most of Nov now. One good thing is she doesn't mind staying home. She gets very lonely but likes her safe home.

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 2:54am
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Anonymous (not verified)

Connielynn, the stupidest question you may ever be asked - is your daughter home-schooled?
This must be such a difficult situation. Do you even know how you're going to be able to let her out into the *real* world in a few years? It must be terribly frightening and mind boggling. Again, I can't even begin to imagine what you're going through. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 5:12am
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Yes, we hs all three kids. My only regret is why didn't we do this sooner? With three kids with health problems, this is the only way to school them.
This year dd is taking a home ec. course designed for highschool youth. She is learning so much. Her way of taking care of herself is not to eat. Now she is learning why she needs to eat. She is 5'3" and weighs about 80#. She really needs to eat!
We stuggle. This fall has been very hard. Thanksgiving is a mess. ( my post is under main board ) I am having a very hard time taking care of everyone. I am barely coping. I find I am having more do nothing days than days we do school and housework. And the cooking that never ends!
I am hanging in there!

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 5:59am
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Anonymous (not verified)

Connielynn, you are the one with the strange family that wants an additional peanut oil fried turkey, aren't you? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] This infuriates me even more, given the circumstances in which you choose to live. Obviously, family members do or *should* know the severity of your daughter's allergy and her number of anaphylactic reactions. And they still want a peanut oil fried turkey? I would kill them! Sorry.
I can understand why you find things difficult. It must be very challenging. I know that I could never homeschool but I also know that there are many people posting here that do and a lot for the peace of mind reason.
Big hugs to you dear woman. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 11:02pm
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My son has had one anaphylactic reaction. He had two other reactions that may actually be considered anaph. but they went away with benadryl alone.
His anaph. reaction was this past Aug. when he ingested a tiny bite of a snicker bar. Bad mommy guilt felt here! I don't think he even swallowed any peanut, it was like acid burning in his mouth. I have to say another big thank you to those who post on this site. I know for sure I would not have given the epi in the first five minutes if I hadn't found this site. Now his dr. says don't even wait to see if two systems are involved, give epi if there is a known ingestion of peanut. It still scares me to think of how long I would have waited, probably until I saw breathing distress. THanks again everyone!
Jill

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 11:30pm
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Hi Cindy! Nope, when my family deep frys a turkey we use plain ole vegtable oil! Never been a problem there.
We may have Thanksgiving with my sister or with all my inlaws. Don't know which! Or if my sister can't come, I may say to heck with it. I do not have the energy to fix a scratch meal for 22+.
Whatever we do, I will have a great day.

Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 4:18am
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Anonymous (not verified)

Connielynn, I'm sorry (and also sorry to the other member I'm confusing you with). I'll have to look at the thread under Main Discussion to see who posted it.
I did find your Thanksgiving thread last night and I did post what we do for the holidays (any of them) and what I've basically done for the past twenty-three years, kids or no kids, PA or no PA. It has just worked really well for me and I've found it a lot less stressful.
I think we just found (that would be ex-DH and current DH) that what we do works really well for *us*. That doesn't mean that it would work for other families. I could tell you about one horrible Christmas Day I spent at my current DH's Mother's, but I don't want to go into the craziness of what goes on at Christmas there. Suffice to say that it's simply not worth it.
I'm trying to remember my childhood and I know that my parents were pretty well the same. We had dinner at our home. Now, I know that my Grandparents did come (my Mother's side, both of my Father's parents were dead) sometimes and I also know that my Aunt and Uncle that lived close came to our house with their children a couple of times. So, maybe that's where I got it from, I don't know, just realizing it for the first time now. It just always seemed to work.
Would I love to be surrounded by family at Christmas? Some of them, sure. I would love to see my Mother but she lives too far away for me to get to visit now. And, even when we did live close, I didn't see her on Christmas. My sister and seeing her is really a non-issue. My MIL knows that she is always welcome at our home for the holidays but again, she doesn't live close to us either. And both SIL's and their families, well, they wouldn't bother either. Perhaps we're a pretty dysfunctional lot, I don't know.
What I do know though is that we just had Thanksgiving in October month here (Canada) and we had just the four of us and we had a good time. There was no stress. And, we'll do the same thing for Christmas.
Connielynn, Happy Thanksgiving. I hope it goes well. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 7:14am
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My daughter has had two anaphylactic reactions. The first, I asked if the cookie had peanuts in it and I was told no, the second, a rice crispy treat had peanut butter in it. Needless to say after that I went and got an epi pen jr. to keep on hand and have changed the way I do things where food is concerned. Scared the heck outta me not to mention my daughter. Kyndall was age 3 when it happened, shes age 5 now almost 6. She hasn't had any since thank god!
Connielynn, Can you give me any info on home schooling, like cost, where to get the supplys and how it works and is it hard to do? Because if I keep feeling my daughters school is unsafe I am going to have to do something different. I have been doing some reading trying to find out what would be the best material for the teacher and the parents to read to try to help them understand and try to be more cautious like when the students went into the other classroom to get their pictures taken and I had to be the one to ask the teacher that taught that room if there had been peanut butter at the tables where my daughter was about to sit or why the aid worker wasn't told about the snicker bar in my daughters room or if they understand there could be cross contamination because no one sees that the kids wash their hands after eating their pbj's. And they wonder why I come to school everyday! hmmmm! Anyway any info would be greatly appreciated, thanks!
Lynn

Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 8:00am
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Thanks for the supoort everyone. Still waiting to hear from my siter, ;0) nothing new there!
Lynn, can I email you off the boards?

Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 10:16am
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connielynn,
Sure you can email me, Thanks!
Lynn

Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 11:50am
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Would you believe I'm not sure? His first reaction involved excessive salivation, itchy eyes, excessive nasal mucus, and perhaps minimal facial swelling (hard to tell because his face was pretty chubby at the time). No hives, no labor breathing, but do his symptoms count as involving more than one system? Further, when we took him to the ER (I could tell it was an allergic reaction of some sort, and figured out that peanut butter was the culprit), the staff there did nothing to treat him. They kept us waiting for about 15 minutes before they saw us, and then just checked his vitals, gave us a prescription for steroids (that couldn't be filled till the next day because of the late hour), and told us to buy some Benadryl on the way home to give him that night. His symptoms resolved while we were at the ER, which is one reason I'm not sure that the reaction was anaphylactic. Obviously, once I learned more about allergic reactions, I realized how poorly the ER staff responded. Within less than a week, I had a prescription for EpiPen Jrs and understood just how serious the situation was.
So, can anyone enlighten me as to whether or not this was an anaphylactic reaction? It just seems kind of borderline or fuzzy for me.
If it helps, he's had two more very mild reactions since then: the first was a contact reaction after playing with kids who'd recently eaten PB sandwiches, and the second was last weekend when he had a swollen lip after eating a hot dog that the manufacturer has assured me was safe. Still not 100% sure the hot dog was the reason, but it was the most likely candidate.
Thanks,
Nancy

Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 12:52pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Jacob has experienced many minor reactions prior to our knowledge of PA (though we suspected it). He then had one anaphylactic reaction to pb and several months later he had another one due to cashews. A year and half later he had a minor reaction to cross contamination. A short time ago he reacted to a food challenge with pb also.
We also homeschool him and will be the other two boys. PA is not the only reason we chose to homeschool but it does make my life slightly easier.

Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 3:23pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

lynn1999_2000, I know I asked you this question in one of your threads under Schools but if I ask you here I'll get notification if you answer for when I don't have time to navigate other threads on the board.
Are you Canadian or American? I do have a copy of my best friend's 504 Plan (American) that I could e-mail you and I also re-raised my son's school plan (Canadian) yesterday for you.
Or, heck, I could e-mail them both to you. My only difficulty, if you're American, is I know you write your 504 Plan up, but then I'm not clear what steps you go through to actually get it implemented. I do know what steps to go through in Canada (not clear if they're really that much different).
The other thing that should get a laugh from some people, but the week before the article on Jesse's PA ran in our local newspaper, there was an article about homeschooling. However, I didn't know that you could actually take your children to another parent's home where she teaches a group of children (I imagine quite small), not just her own children. It was very interesting and I found out a lot more about homeschooling. I just know that for me, I wouldn't be able to do it, too disorganized, and I am simply amazed by the people here who do do it, but it was encouraging for me to see that if I ever did feel I needed to choose that route, I didn't necessarily have to be the parent in charge of the homeschooling. Of course then, I'd have to put PA precautions into place with the actual homeschooler person.
To the person who asked if their child's reaction was anaphylactic, I'm not clear from what I read whether it was or not. I know that there is a thread that is older here about what the exact symptoms of an anphylactic reaction are and at this late hour I even forget how many of the systems have to be compromised (is it 3?). At any rate, you don't have to have ALL of the symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction to qualify as anaphylaxis, just a certain number of systems being compromised. Since I'm getting notification if anyone replies in this thread, if I remember, I'll try to search out the old thread that might be of help to you.
I have to say that in looking back at Jesse's first reaction, it *could* have been considered anaphylactic as well. But the next two definitely were without question.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sun, 11/24/2002 - 1:09am
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Cindy,
I live in America. Wow that would be great if you could email me your friends 504 plan. I am so lost and not sure how to even start writing one up. I have read so much info in the last three days my head is spinning, lol.
Lynn

Posted on: Sun, 11/24/2002 - 1:57am
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WOW ((((((((group hug to all)))))))! Do I feel lucky. Drew has never had an anaphlatic reaction.
He has gotten hives only three times that I know of. His doctor says that he tips the scale on the highest end of the blood testing that he had earlier this year.
I guess this is why I have always have felt at ease giving him certain foods that I know most of you do not allow your children to have like Ice cream. Drew would die if he knew that he couldn't eat it. I know that I have been very fortunate (Drew too) that even though we are on the high risk side that we have never had a strong reaction other than hives.
Drew usually knows if he can't eat certain things like any kind of beef or cake. His tongue burns when eats it.
Well God love you all, because you can't beat yourselves up because of your childs reaction. We live and learn and I'm sure you do everything in your power to keep your pa child safe.
God bless to you all,
Renee [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 11/24/2002 - 3:44am
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Renee,
My daughter started out with hives too. But they say each reaction is worse then the one before and boy do I believe it. She had a few or more incidents with hives in the beginning but it progressed into anaphylaxis. She had a six on the RAST test.
Lynn

Posted on: Tue, 12/10/2002 - 4:27am
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DD, now 3 1/2 has had two anaphylactic episodes- the first was ingestion of pb at 11 mo, and the second was a mystery exposure at 30 months old. We are assuming it was pn since nothing else is a likely culprit. Both resulted in ER treatment. Neither elicited asthma as a symptom, but both involved blood pressure. We have has MANY MANY reactions to aerosols and residue, but none that we consider this serious, although some have required Benadryl treatment for 24 hrs or so. Having seen a wide variety of different reaction symptoms and severity, trust me when I say that there is generally NO QUESTION in your mind as a parent when a reaction qualifies as "anaphylaxis." That is the situation for us, anyway- this is the situation when every fibre of your being is crying out in panic because your child needs help NOW NOW NOW. Milder reactions, no matter what the symptoms (I say- my child is not asthmatic, remember.) just don't elicit that for me, ever.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
BTW, yes, I am still "around".... just busy busy busy... working part-time and doing full-time mommying. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
-Shannon

Posted on: Tue, 12/10/2002 - 5:50am
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I just found this site and am not too sure how it works, but I'll just dive right in anyway. It seems like I've experienced everything most of you have. My son has had 2 anaphylactic reactions, the 2nd was the scariest thing that has ever happened to me. I thought I was watching him die. His dad missed seeing the severity and is still in a bit of dennial, but doesn't have the courage to argue with me anymore about precautions. At school, when he started he had never had an anaphylactic reaction and the principal did not want to step on any toes, so she called his classroom a peanut "safe" zone, suggesting parents not send peanut products. We got a new principal last year a month before his first reaction, and I told her after the reaction that I needed the whole school to be peanut free. She was very supportive, and after witnessing my sons second reaction, she's even more supportive and vocal about educating the students and parents. She has taken a lot of abuse from some ignorant parents, but she has stood by us and for that I am forever grateful. If you are having problems with a school administrator, I would going over their head to their boss. Good luck.
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Cynde Punch

Posted on: Tue, 12/10/2002 - 7:40am
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Corvallis Mom! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Just have to say how good it is to see you posting again. You have been missed!
And welcome to Cynde [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Tue, 12/10/2002 - 10:35am
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Corvallis Mom,
I swear, just this morning I was thinking, "Whatever happened to Corvallis Mom. We could really use her input." And here you are! Telepathy, or just coincidence? (Twilight Zone music in the background, LOL!)
Don't be a stranger, OK?
And welcome to Cynde!
Amy

Posted on: Wed, 06/22/2005 - 2:44pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

(doing a search of the board for one topic I knew I had raised and got a short-list back of 6 and thought, hey, some of these questions look okay still and perhaps new members might like to answer or old members add to it if there have been any changes, so.....)
Simply re-raising. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 06/22/2005 - 2:49pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Up-dating since my original answer. Jesse has had three anaphylactic reactions now.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 06/23/2005 - 7:08am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Shane has had:
(3) ingestion reactions - hives only (at day care, under a year old) Diagnosed on 3rd reaction.
(2) airborne reactions & (2) ingestion reactions with hives, running itching eyes and eye swelling. Treated with benadryl only.
(1) anaphylactic ingestion reaction and (1) anaphylactic airborne/contact reaction with hives, running itching eyes and extreme facial swelling. Treated with benadryl and ER visits with steroids and IV meds.
Each reaction has been progressively worse. We have been reaction free for almost 4 years now.
Have a blessed day,
Bridget

Posted on: Thu, 06/23/2005 - 7:36am
happycat's picture
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Joined: 08/31/2004 - 09:00

My PA child has never had an anaphylactic reaction (touch wood!).
He had maybe 5 - 10 exposures to peanut before we clued in to the fact that something might be going on.
His first taste, at about 14 mos, he ate 2 peanuts and nothing happened. A few weeks later he ate part of a PB sandwich, but didn't like it because it was "hot". He had tastes of peanut periodically after that, and either complained it was too hot to eat or just spat them out.
His reactions to peanut butter has always been stronger than his reaction to peanuts (more likely to complain of burning in the mouth, than to just spit it out).

Posted on: Tue, 06/28/2005 - 9:01pm
Cliok's picture
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Joined: 04/09/2004 - 09:00

Iseult had an anaphylactic reaction a few months ago - I think I'm only realising now that it was anaphylactic. She told us straight away that something was wrong, vomited and less than 5 minutes later was completely hoarse and pointing to her chin and neck and saying it was sore. It was a reaction to peas in a soup - we hadn't realised she was allergic to peas as well as all the other things she's allergic to. Very scary experience - I think now we should have used the anapen but we didn't and her symptoms died down of their own accord.

Posted on: Tue, 06/28/2005 - 11:31pm
samsmommy99's picture
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Joined: 06/07/2005 - 09:00

Luckily we have only had one ANA reaction, he was 8 months and had the tiniest amout of peanut butter.....the reaction was delayed, but had I not gone to get him in his crib when he was fussing I'd hate to think what could have happened, he had hives all over, vomiting, turned blue, and almost stopped breathing, the paramedics arrived within 3 minutes and he was given epinephrine, then taken to the hospital where he was diagnosed with PA. no other reactions have occured.
------------------
Mother to a 5YO PA, soy, gluten and wheat allergic child who is also autistic. ( non-speaking autistic child who can't tell anyone who he is or what he can eat or not eat!!! scary stuff!!)

Posted on: Fri, 07/08/2005 - 5:43am
leers's picture
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Joined: 07/09/2001 - 09:00

I am probably going to jinx myself by saying this but our son has never went into anphylactic shock. He has had the allergy for 5 years now and has only broke out into hives. I dread the day it does happen. Mind you listening to everyone's experiences has prepared me for anything.....
Pam

Posted on: Sat, 07/09/2005 - 4:50pm
solarflare's picture
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Joined: 02/07/2002 - 09:00

He's had anaphylactic reactions to peanuts (carried in dog saliva) and squid, but not to the point of anaphylactic shock. These reactions involved hives, facial swelling, runny nose, eczema flares and on one occasion, his tongue started to swell. He's never had breathing difficulties, wheezing or loss of conciousness during a reaction.
------------------
Cheryl, mom to Jason (7 MFA including peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish and egg),Joey (5 NKA) and Allison (2ish suspected milk and squash allergy)

Posted on: Sun, 07/10/2005 - 2:59am
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

My daughter had what I believe was an anaphylactic reaction to milk when she was 5 months old (as an infant and toddler she was also allergic to milk and eggs.) She did not go into shock, but she had flushing, hives, facial swelling, gums swelling, itching in her mouth (she scratched at her mouth and made her gums bleed!), abdominal pain (colic), and later eczema.
She recovered without treatment, and was later tested for food allergies. That is how she was diagnosed with peanut allergy. She has never eaten anything with peanut in it (knock on wood!) She has had minor reactions (hives) to traces of peanut in food, and contact reactions (hives) to peanut butter and peanut flour (in a granola bar).
------------------
Mom to 6 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 2 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Mon, 07/11/2005 - 12:21am
mommyofmatt's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2004 - 09:00

Re-raising for Livsmom [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
We haven't had any anaphylactic reaction yet. It's been 2 years since diagnosis. Meg

Posted on: Mon, 07/11/2005 - 12:43am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

yes. to peanut, [b]almonds, and lentils[/b]. Although all the reactions were impressive, something about the lentil reaction was duely so.

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