Has Anyone Switched To or Tried TwinJect?

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Pardon me if I didn't do the spelling exactly correct. Has anyone switched to or tried TwinJect?

If you have, have you had to use it?

If you have had to use it, had you had to use an Epi-Pen in the past?

Any comments about the product?

I know that in the literature I received from my son's school, after Sabrina's Law came into effect here (and just received it recently), they do have both modes of rescue mentioned.

I have no intention of switching but I'm unclear why if that makes any sense. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img]

Many thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I would walk up to heaven and bring you back home with me.

On May 18, 2006

When I replaced DD's epi's in the winter, I asked about the Twinjects. The pharmacy let us look at one, and I had been on the website to see how to use it. I showed DD, asked her if she thought she'd want to get one - 2 shots of epi for the same price - but she said 'No' . She didn't like the idea of injecting the second dose herself with the syringe, even though we've never used the epi (yet!). DD is 19, and still at home, but employed P/T and social and mobile. The chances of the need for epi happening at home are far less than when she's out on her own, so I wanted her to be comfortable.

On May 19, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by csc: [b]I have no intention of switching but I'm unclear why if that makes any sense. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img] [/b]

For my son I'm sticking with the epi-pen (unless and until the insurance company decides they will only cover the twinject). The reason for this is, the school knows how to use it - it's what they are most comfortable with. The twinject is very similar. (keeping in mind, this school would only give the auto shot anyway, not the second dose) But, the big difference is - taking caps off both ends. It's a little thing, I know - but it's big in an emergency.

So, for him I stick with the epi.

For me, I would like to switch to the twinject, however - if I do I worry that will lead to the insurance company making a decision on which they will cover - and I want the epi-pen covered.

[i]I hope I don't sound shallow worrying so much about insurance. But, buying epinephrine for two people gets expensive.[/i]

On May 19, 2006

DH (and I) are self-employed. No insurance plan other than OHIP. I too, was thinking about cost - 2 doses for the same price as one Epi-Pen.

(What if you only need one of the twinject doses - is the other one viable at a later date?)

Anyway, DD wanted the Epi-Pen, she's the one who likely would be injecting it, so I went with her comfort level.

Not that I want her to have ever needed epi, but on some level, I can't help thinking, 'how many of these have we bought in the last 11 years at $100 each?'. Health over the cost, that's the decision.

On May 19, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by lmw: [b] (What if you only need one of the twinject doses - is the other one viable at a later date?) [/b]

No. The second dose is from the same syringe, same needle as the first. You take the syringe out of the autoinjector and remove a little collar from the plunger. This lets you push the plunger down the rest of the way to administer a second dose. It would have to be used within minutes of the first dose, I would think.

Cathy

------------------ Mom to 6 1/2 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

On May 19, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by Momcat: [b] No. The second dose is from the same syringe, same needle as the first. You take the syringe out of the autoinjector and remove a little collar from the plunger. This lets you push the plunger down the rest of the way to administer a second dose. It would have to be used within minutes of the first dose, I would think. [/b]

I have seen a model version of the Twinject and don;t like it. The second dose to me is a danger. You use the same needle & have to pull it out of the contraption. This is such a pressure filled few moments, I expect many many people to stick themselves with the needle.

On May 19, 2006

Our allergist showed us the Twinject at our last appointment. My DD is 5, so for us it makes sense to stick with the Epi-Pen. I also think more people, such as teachers, are familiar with the Epi. The second dose is from a syringe and would need to be thrown out if not used because only one dose was needed. This is unlike the Twin Pack Epis, where if you use one of the doses you don't have to discard the second dose. I think for that reason the Epis make sense.

On May 20, 2006

Last time we renewed our Epis, I asked for one Twinject just to check it out.

In my opinion, I would never give this to a lay person and expect them to feel comfortable using it. However, I am comfortable giving injections in the typical manner so for me it's actually a convenience as it packs much smaller. I keep it in my purse and it takes up less than half the space of two Epipens.

I think for a teen or adult that is comfortable giving self injections, it is a good, space saving alternative. But for small children who depend on others such as teachers or grandparents taking care of them, the standard Epipen is much easier to learn and use.

On May 20, 2006

Thank-you for the responses. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I'm sticking with the Epi-Pen. Jesse had actually read about Twinject here in the new ad that comes up. It is on our school's paperwork - the doctor has to check what we'll be using.

Anna Marie, you posted:-

I hope I don't sound shallow worrying so much about insurance. But, buying epinephrine for two people gets expensive.

I can well imagine. 4 Epi-Pens a year for us, or if we're lucky, every 16 - 18 months, and I do have insurance that covers them for which I am EXTREMELY thankful, but I still know, in my head, that that's $400.00 a year. I don't think that sounds shallow at all. It sounds, um, realistic.

lmw, sorry, I almost have to re-read your post, but if you don't have any insurance for drug coverage and are in Ontario (which yes, you are, you said OHIP), you can apply for Trillium insurance. Sorry, if you did say something in your post whereby you didn't need me to say a word.

I appreciate everyone's responses so far.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I would walk up to heaven and bring you back home with me.

On May 20, 2006

Thanks csc for the tip. So happens I have time tonight to wander around the internet! Trillium Insurance, here I come. (Hopefully they have a website.)

When we first started buying epi, DH was a GovCan employee. Now he's in business for himself, so we have just submitted the costs as medical receipts every April.

On May 21, 2006

I've seen it and got a trainer and was not too impressed. While I like the idea of only having one to carry (much easier for boys and men), it's just too complicated to do while one is under pressure. I can see someone with shaky hands just not being able to do it.

I'm sticking with the Epipen too. I'm still hoping for that Epicard to hit the market!

Amy

On May 22, 2006

lmw, hope this helps:

[url="http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/public/pub/drugs/trillium.html"]www.health.gov.on.ca/english/public/pub/drugs/trillium.html[/url]

On May 22, 2006

I've talked to someone at TJ IRT the way to use it et al...

Sure, it seems like a good product, and if epi pen weren't there, we'd WANT TJ.

But we've been re-buying epi's for YEARS now.

Do I want to change? Do I want to explain how to use it, to teachers (who've been trained w/epis...)?

If I were unhappy with the size, or the exposed needle after usage, than MAYBE I'd switch...

But you know what? I'm ok with what we have.

Jason

------------------ [b]* Obsessed * [/b]

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