Halloween Ideas?

Posted on: Fri, 10/12/2001 - 4:03am
CMartin's picture
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Joined: 02/18/2000 - 09:00

I'm relatively new to this discussion board so forgive me if this topic has been covered in depth...

My daughter is almost 3 and is really looking forward to Hallowen! Her peanut allergy has me really nervous about this holiday -- what ideas do others have about keeping their kids safe? My daughter knows "No nuts... they are not safe" but she wouldn't know a peanut if it bonked her on the head!

One idea I had was to distribute a little note and some safe candy to the houses on our street. Something to heighten awareness this year and for the coming years. This makes sure there is a safe choice at their doors -- and we can steer her toward those good choices.

But I am also nervous about the prevalence of peanuts -- on little hands, at friend's houses... What do people do???!! HELP!

Posted on: Fri, 10/12/2001 - 4:52am
Adrienne_J's picture
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Joined: 10/09/2001 - 09:00

hi Halloween-question [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
not sure if this will help at all...when I was little I never had a reaction associated with Halloween. The parents whose house/party I was going to would be informed by my mom about my severe allergy (basically had to say the words 'she could die' so they would understand the severity)...I'm sure you will be with your 3 year old when she is at parties/trick or treating, but when she is older she'll most likely have learned not to eat anything unless she herself can read a label or the parent in charge does...and if there are no ingredients (baked good) then don't eat it at all...that's how I grew up with the allergy...I never felt like I was left out...my mom would send me with a ziploc of my own baked goods to enjoy...
for the candy of Trick or Treat...in my family, I'd go trick-or-treating, come home with a huge bag of candy, and then we'd do "swaps" between my sister,father, mother, and self so I could purge my bag of unknowns or nut-filled candy...it worked great! I got to have all my favorite candy and not stuck with anything I couldn't eat! I think your idea of "stocking" neighbors with okay-treats is a great idea!
Also - for those with older kids, be sure to tell them not to do the "mystery feel" game that many parties do (unpeeled grape eyeballs, wet spaghetti) b/c most of the time they have something ooey-gooey filled with peanut butter! (me=week with hives on hands!)
Good luck!
Adrienne

Posted on: Fri, 10/12/2001 - 6:05am
GPMac's picture
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Joined: 10/02/2001 - 09:00

I have been thinking about the same stuff. My dd is only 2 and this will really be her first time out. I had planned to swap some forbidden stuff with the Nestles safe treats, some small toys and books. My friends told me at their house the kids leave some treats out to feed "the Great Pumpkin". And in exchange the leaves them gifts. Wink-wink Let's face it they really don't need all of that junk do they! ....Leave it to Mommy and Daddy they we'll take care of it..he-he! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
We are going to try and put the focus on other fun stuff for Halloween like funky pumpkin carving. I am trying to come up with a Dr Seuss pattern.
Check out these patterns:
[url="http://www.beanbagnewsflash.com/halloween/jacklaterns.html"]http://www.beanbagnewsflash.com/halloween/jacklaterns.html[/url]
Or maybe put her face on a pumpkin:
[url="http://www.jack-o-lantern.com/portrait/index.html"]http://www.jack-o-lantern.com/portrait/index.html[/url]
Or you can buy a program:
[url="http://www.meonapumpkin.com/freestuff/index.html"]http://www.meonapumpkin.com/freestuff/index.html[/url]
and visiting a real pumpkin patch to shop for a pumpkin!
A little off topic but.....I am surprised no one has mentioned putting the kybosh on Halloween this year in light of the resent events. Who knows it still might come up. When I was a kid Trudeau brought down the war measures act during the FLQ crisis and that was the end of our Halloween that year. While living in Europe during the Gulf War all of Europe canceled their idea of Halloween, Fashing(SP?).
That reminds me here is a unusual Halloween contest you Americans might get a kick out of(along with getting out your frustrations).
[url="http://www.meonapumpkin.com/freestuff/stencils/binindex.html"]http://www.meonapumpkin.com/freestuff/stencils/binindex.html[/url]
Gail

Posted on: Fri, 10/12/2001 - 11:31am
Chicago's picture
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Joined: 04/21/2001 - 09:00

One idea is to pick out all the unsafe candy - (trade it for safe candy or money) and then after 2 weeks or so, let the Sugar Witch take the rest away. I had heard of the Sugar Witch long before PA as a method of trading in uneaten candy after a resonable time. With PA, if you prefer she could come on Halloween night to do her removal ASAP - depends if you have other kids you want to save from a mid Nov. sugar rush. She leaves other gifts in exchange for the candy such as colder weather clothes, games, toys or coupons for movies etc...It is also an excellent way to get the candy away from MOM (my thighs don't need it).
Hope that idea helps.

Posted on: Sat, 10/13/2001 - 2:01am
SLICE's picture
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Joined: 07/20/2000 - 09:00

We're going to trade pennies for unsafe candies this year - my 6 yr old PA son is saving for a Nintendo.

Posted on: Mon, 10/15/2001 - 5:49am
julieb's picture
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Joined: 07/21/2001 - 09:00

My toddler will be 2 just before Halloween, so this will be his first trick-or-treating experience. I want it to be a good one and also had thought about giving neighbors a "safe" snack baggie of candy and a Hot Wheel car that they could give to my toddler when he came to their door. However, this idea met with opposition from some of my close friends in the neighborhood since they said they would have no problem with that, but that many of our neighbors are "whacked" and would have a holier-than-thou and a "you can't tell me what to do" attitude. So, nix for us on that idea.
So, I asked my six year old what he thought of the idea of going trick-or-treating with his brother (but not mentioning to the neighbors about his brother's allergies), coming home and handing over all his candy and all his brother's candy to their Daddy. Daddy would then take the candy into work so that there wouldn't be any unsafe candy to get into. I would then take both boys to Toys R Us and let them pick out a toy, video, book, or whatever (within reason) for the exchange of the candy to the their Daddy.
Let me tell ya, my six year old can't wait to "go shopping". And Daddy is looking forward to his "loot" to bring to work. The toddler is clueless, but I wanted to set up a precedent that we could follow every year. Plus, he's allergic to so many foods that he can only have Dum-Dums and American Smarties. So trading his "unsafe" candy for "safe" candy would put him into a sugar shock. Grin. I hope our exchange works and I hope you find a good solution for your situation. Warmly, Julie B.
UGH: Edit to fix typo.
[This message has been edited by julieb (edited October 15, 2001).]

Posted on: Mon, 10/15/2001 - 10:41am
Chicago's picture
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Joined: 04/21/2001 - 09:00

I think it is a great idea and the Food Allergy Network Kid Newsletter dd just got has a PA/TA child that trades the unsafe stuff for money - just like you said. DD was very interested, we may have a new tradition starting...

Posted on: Tue, 10/16/2001 - 6:45am
CMartin's picture
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Joined: 02/18/2000 - 09:00

Okay, one last question. Do any of you worry about your child touching the WRAPPED unsafe candy? Do we know if Reese's PB Cups (wrapped) can give a reaction? I'm just wondering - sounds like no, if everyone traditionally has brought their loot home and traded...

Posted on: Tue, 10/16/2001 - 9:25am
BENSMOM's picture
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Joined: 05/20/2000 - 09:00

Forget trading! I just have the kids dump their loot, and I REMOVE whatever they can't have. If they lose over half, all the better--they get way too much anyway. Hubby and I get to eat the rejects [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]. The only problem is that this leaves Ben with all the hard, colored candy and the dyes seem to aggravate his eczema. He's been eczema free since last spring so we'll hope for the best.
[This message has been edited by BENSMOM (edited October 16, 2001).]

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