Halloween

Posted on: Mon, 09/15/2003 - 6:32pm
toomanynuts's picture
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Does anyone know if the Halloween Trick or Treat Mini Size candies such as Skittles/Starburst, Nerds, Wonka candies are still safe if they come in the large bags filled only with those candies just mini sizes? We just bought two large bags of nerds - strawberry and grape mini size boxes and one of Skittles and starburst in mini size bags. Hope someone knows. Thank You.

Posted on: Mon, 09/15/2003 - 11:35pm
erik's picture
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Hi toomanynuts,
Yes... Nerds and Skittles and Starburst are all safe in all sizes. Always check labels in case manufacturing conditions change in the future.
I raised a thread called "Halloween safe candy" to assist you as it has more info in it [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 09/22/2006 - 1:01pm
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i love it! so smart on so many different levels and the fact that it's good for your child is just icing on the cake (the one that's not going to be there...haha). [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 09/15/2006 - 3:11am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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A warm welcome, Neptune!
There is a thread running on the main forum right now that deals with this very issue.
Linking:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/008282.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/008282.html[/url]
As you can see, there are many ways of handling it.
For information on which manufacturers tend to produce safe candy, etc. it is best to check the Manufacturer's forum regularly over the next several weeks as others begin stocking up and calling about holiday items.
Good to see you are learning to plan ahead-- waaaaaaay ahead. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] It is a great management tool.
[This message has been edited by Corvallis Mom (edited September 15, 2006).]

Posted on: Fri, 09/15/2006 - 5:50am
joeybeth's picture
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i usually give out packets of hot chocolate (goes over very well....and different too) and i also re-gift peanut products and may contains that my children recieve in their bags (though i have noticed this was not a popular idea among some folks at pa.com - no big deal - i'll keep doing it anyhow. it gets the stuff out of my house without me having to just throw it away). i buy "replacement" candy and items for my chidlren (not much...just a few of their very, very favorite things to help them get over the trauma of losing all their goodies). [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 09/15/2006 - 8:44am
Alyssasmom's picture
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individually wrapped bags of pretzels from BJ's

Posted on: Sat, 09/16/2006 - 6:26am
ceross's picture
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Joined: 01/27/2004 - 09:00

The following are usually safe but check the labels every year:
Milk Duds
Tootsie Rolls
Twizzlers
Sweettarts
Dum-Dum lollipops
Nerds
Whoppers

Posted on: Sat, 09/16/2006 - 11:10am
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

Junior Mints

Posted on: Sat, 09/16/2006 - 1:27pm
HaroldsMom's picture
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Smarties

Posted on: Mon, 09/18/2006 - 12:35am
MimiM's picture
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Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

Joeybeth,
Don't feel bad. I do the exact same thing. I hand out whatever came in my son's bag that's not safe. He knows ahead of time that he won't be able to keep everything.
On the other hand, the candy that I actually buy to hand out is all safe so that my son always gets to eat whatever is left over. The more unsafe treats we hand back out, the more of the safe stuff we still have!

Posted on: Fri, 09/22/2006 - 1:01pm
joeybeth's picture
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Joined: 09/01/2006 - 09:00

i love it! so smart on so many different levels and the fact that it's good for your child is just icing on the cake (the one that's not going to be there...haha). [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 09/15/2006 - 3:11am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

A warm welcome, Neptune!
There is a thread running on the main forum right now that deals with this very issue.
Linking:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/008282.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/008282.html[/url]
As you can see, there are many ways of handling it.
For information on which manufacturers tend to produce safe candy, etc. it is best to check the Manufacturer's forum regularly over the next several weeks as others begin stocking up and calling about holiday items.
Good to see you are learning to plan ahead-- waaaaaaay ahead. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] It is a great management tool.
[This message has been edited by Corvallis Mom (edited September 15, 2006).]

Posted on: Fri, 09/15/2006 - 5:50am
joeybeth's picture
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Joined: 09/01/2006 - 09:00

i usually give out packets of hot chocolate (goes over very well....and different too) and i also re-gift peanut products and may contains that my children recieve in their bags (though i have noticed this was not a popular idea among some folks at pa.com - no big deal - i'll keep doing it anyhow. it gets the stuff out of my house without me having to just throw it away). i buy "replacement" candy and items for my chidlren (not much...just a few of their very, very favorite things to help them get over the trauma of losing all their goodies). [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 09/15/2006 - 8:44am
Alyssasmom's picture
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Joined: 10/09/2005 - 09:00

individually wrapped bags of pretzels from BJ's

Posted on: Sat, 09/16/2006 - 6:26am
ceross's picture
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Joined: 01/27/2004 - 09:00

The following are usually safe but check the labels every year:
Milk Duds
Tootsie Rolls
Twizzlers
Sweettarts
Dum-Dum lollipops
Nerds
Whoppers

Posted on: Sat, 09/16/2006 - 11:10am
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

Junior Mints

Posted on: Sat, 09/16/2006 - 1:27pm
HaroldsMom's picture
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Joined: 11/15/2005 - 09:00

Smarties

Posted on: Mon, 09/18/2006 - 12:35am
MimiM's picture
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Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

Joeybeth,
Don't feel bad. I do the exact same thing. I hand out whatever came in my son's bag that's not safe. He knows ahead of time that he won't be able to keep everything.
On the other hand, the candy that I actually buy to hand out is all safe so that my son always gets to eat whatever is left over. The more unsafe treats we hand back out, the more of the safe stuff we still have!

Posted on: Wed, 09/19/2007 - 6:02am
hollya's picture
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Joined: 05/10/2007 - 09:00

What a cute idea! I will check it out.

Posted on: Wed, 09/19/2007 - 8:46am
Kelly H's picture
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Joined: 09/11/2007 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Kelly H:
[b]I just made some new shirts that say
Trick Or Treat, Smell My Feet, Peanut-Free Candy Is What I Eat" and "This Pumpkin Is Peanut Free" if anyone is interested you can go to my store at [URL=http://www.cafepress.com/bjortandcompany[/url] I have already ordered 5 of them for my son, niece and their PA friends. I hope you like them.
[/b]
Okay, I fixed the link

Posted on: Wed, 09/19/2007 - 8:50am
Kelly H's picture
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Joined: 09/11/2007 - 09:00

If this link doesn't work then after you click it where it says more stuff from bjortandcompanyinc just click there.
[url="http://www.cafepress.com/bjortandcompany"]www.cafepress.com/bjortandcompany[/url]
------------------
Kelly H

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 3:08am
lj's picture
lj
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Joined: 01/26/2006 - 09:00

We have successfully handled trick or treating for the last few years. My son will be 6 this year.
First of all, my husband or I (or both) go with him and his brother along w/ a large group of neighborhood kids and parents.
No candy is allowed to be eaten while out.
All candy is searched when returned at home and safe (i.e. wrapped, labeled) pieces are kept.
Hands are washed, "bad" candy is discarded and pumpkin used for trick or treating is washed in hot, soapy water.
We have plenty of safe candy on hand to trade. I am embarrassed to say that we STILL have Halloween candy in the "pumpkin" in our laundry room. They forget about it in a day or two and we have never had a shortage.
Now, this will be his first year of school so I know that will bring different challenges. His preschool has been wonderful.
Just letting you know, it can be handled safely and in a fun way. I haven't felt that he's missed out on anything.
I feel that there are plenty of "nut-free" options available in stores now. You will find that this board will post many helpful hints during October.
LJ

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 3:16am
Greenlady's picture
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Joined: 06/30/2004 - 09:00

Another option is to have the children leave out their candy for the "Halloween Fairy" who will trade a really cool non-food present for it. Here's a book about her:
[url="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0977309606/qid=1130771846/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-9127588-5443858?v=glance&s=books"]http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/det...=glance&s=books[/url]

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 4:11am
infraread's picture
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Joined: 06/11/2007 - 09:00

We use the "Candy Fairy" idea with great success. DS is 5, and last year was the first year we needed to, because we got by with "this is safe, this is not..." Last year, we made a big production out of picking out the safe candies, and all the unsafe went back into the pumpkin to be set for the Candy Fairy. She doesn't come when you're awake, y'know... So when he went to sleep, I packaged all the stuff he couldn't have and sent it overseas to his daddy (Deployed at the time), washed out the pumpkin, and filled it with stickers and markers and other small fun stuff.
Also, no eating anything at all until I've looked it over, no sharing or trading unless I'm ok with it, but we don't wipe down the safe candy. I will toss anything that is gooey or has melted anything on it, but those are my comfort zone.

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 4:18am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

amazingly, with all our reactions, we've never had problems on Halloween(although I am a basket case!!!)
I let my kids do the usual trick or treating, they fill their bags with...yes...things they are allergic to. Once home, *I* go through ALL candy and sort out all chocolate. Since I have choc and milk allergies, it's just easier to ditch it right there(not even worrying about nuts at this point). So basically were left with gum, suckers, nerds, skittles and taffy stuff. Anything NOT labeled, goes in the trash. Then the rest of it, is just the *usual* stuff we end up with every year which goes into a family bowl that I let them pick stuff form now and then(they never get free reign of their candy, no way)!!! But it's worked for us, with the multiple allergies, so far we've never had any problems. Good luck!!
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 1/2(beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig, hamster & asthma)
Jake-6 1/2(peanut, all tree nuts, seeds(all-sesame, sunflower, poppy, pine nut) beef, chicken, eggs, coconut(also avoiding legumes), trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-4 (peanut, tree nuts, milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig, hamster, grass, mold, dust mite and EE)
Savannah-1 1/2 (milk, beef and egg, dog(avoiding peanuts, tree nuts, strawberries, seeds, legumes and corn)

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 4:46am
Sarahfran1's picture
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Joined: 12/01/2006 - 09:00

We've always done the candy-trading thing--kids go trick or treating and collect as much loot as possible, then when they get back home I go through it all, separating out the safe and unsafe stuff, then I trade their unsafe stuff for safe stuff from our own stash. It's easy and I've never gotten a word of complaint from the kids.
You know what is safe from experience--it doesn't take long to get familiar with what's out there and what they're likely to get in their trick or treat bags. If anything is questionable, I treat it as if it's unsafe. I only leave the things that I *know* are safe.
I don't worry about the possibility that a rogue piece of unwrapped candy might accidentally contaminate a piece of safe candy. Partly that's because candy wrappings have gotten much better in recent years so coming across something unwrapped almost never happens, and the chances against that one rare piece of unwrapped unsafe stuff touching a safe piece that then contaminates my child's hands and is then transferred to her mouth are astronomical. And partly it's because I just don't worry about stuff like that happening, like I don't worry about the odd bit of PB smear that might be on playground equipment or the kid who had a PB bagel for breakfast coming to school with unwashed hands. Once you start worrying about stuff like that, you'll drive yourself crazy and find yourself worrying about every possible source of allergen, however unlikely the possibility might be. I control what I can, I stay reasonable, I balance the need to stay safe with the need to live a full life, and I keep our epi-pens and benadryl nearby. So far it's working for us, although I might take a more hard line if my DD had multiple food allergies or were more sensitive.
Sarah

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 6:26am
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I like the Halloween fairy! Don't know if my 5 year old will buy it though. LOL Verygood suggestions. Wasn't sure about the possibility of contamination... just something I thought of.
Man this year will be stressful. Oh and either dh or I always go with the boys and we've never let them eat anything till we get home and inspect each piece.
I figure dh can take the candy to work, or give it to my friends kids next door.

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 6:26am
smudgesgarden's picture
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Joined: 02/26/2006 - 09:00

we let them keep the safe candy and have the great candy trade in for the unsafe candy.
we purchace all the safe candy and they trade in peice for peice. they are happy and we give away the unsafe stuff.
there is a list on this board of safe candy. but im not good at doing searches and i dont know how to link stuff.
erin

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 6:28am
Jen224's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2006 - 09:00

DS was two last year--so it was easy and early enough to set the stage for "this is the way it is done."
I let him go trick-or-treating. Some neighbors who are accutely aware of his allergy, gave him stickers or little balls/toys. I was pretty nervous about him getting candy--even handling it through the wrapper, but we washed hands immediatley when we got home (even had wet wipes to wash hands after going to a house with Reeses--that's probably extreme, but it was my first year). Since he was only 2, I exchanged the whole loot for some plastic jungle animals and made a big deal about "OH WOW, look at all your animals!" He was thrilled--still played with to this day. DH took the candy to work. This year, I'll probably do something similar (love the Halloween Fairy book idea!) and get a couple safe treats too for an exchange.
I've heard incorporating gloves into your child's costume could be another measure of protection too.
------------------
Jen
DS#1--3 years old: allergic to peanuts & fish
DS#2--5 months old: NKA

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 8:35am
Spoedig's picture
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Joined: 09/17/2004 - 09:00

For the 1st few years (my son was diagnosed at 12 months), he would dress up and WE would take small bags of goodies to our adult neighbors -- accepting nothing. (Of course, with my first he wasn't allowed to have sugar until he was over 3 lol - ate an apple slice for his first birthday!).
He is now almost 11 and has "safely" trick-or-treated for many years. Happily, many people in our area let the child select and offer non-chocolate choices (skittles, starburst, swedish fish) so he accepts those -- for years I did swap the candy out (not as the fairy however)but now he just has the few "safe" items and it really is no big deal....I would suggest not trying the candy swapping first -- if no big deal, they will be eating much less sugar!!
Of course, I always try to be a good example to the neighborhood kids -- for young ones no candy -- stickers,perhaps goldfish, even small books; we offer no chocolate to older ones.

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 8:43am
lilysmom's picture
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Joined: 07/20/2007 - 09:00

We have trick or treated in our neighborhood, no candy is to be eaten until home. Safe candy stays. All other nonsafe candy gets sent to the troops in Iraq. Just a thought, why throw it away when it can put a smile on somebody elses face. We top off the night with her favorite meal. Since we do go out we leave safe candy on our doorstep for the other neighborhood kids. I tried the Halloween fairy last year she didn't buy it she wanted to go with the other kids.

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 9:38am
McCobbre's picture
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Joined: 04/16/2005 - 09:00

Basically we've done what others have, but instead of the fairy we have a candy buy back progam--not with money but for cool stuff like a DVD or this past year a double stomp rocket toy that set me back $30. He gets to pick from the leftover safe candy but I basically throw away his candy bag at Xmas almos untouched. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Hang on, hang on to the vine. Stay on. Soon you'll be divine.

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 10:53am
solarflare's picture
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Joined: 02/07/2002 - 09:00

We've always let them go trick or treating, sorted out unsafe candy afterwards (peanut, treenut and coconut stuff goes to work with DH) and supplement with safe candy as necessary.
Even with DH and I helping eat the candy, they never finish it all.
------------------
Cheryl, mom to Jason (9 MFA including peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, coconut, sesame, squid)
Joey (7 NKA)
Allison (4 milk allergic, suspect shellfish, avoiding PN/TN for now)
Ryan (1) nka *knock on wood*

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 11:57am
pitterpat's picture
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Joined: 02/04/2006 - 09:00

We trick-or-treat with our girls, and ALL candy received is gone when we get home. No eating until we get home and no touching candy -- hold the basket open for the person to drop in. Daddy takes the candy with him to work. Then we offer a small amount of safe candy (usually something really good and a rare treat) and a small toy or money for the piggy bank in exchange. After seeing those unwrapped PN M&Ms and Baby Ruth Bars, NOTHING IN A TRICK OR TREAT BAG CAN BE SAFE.
Oh....and I have no worries. I know my girls are safe.
Good luck.
Patty

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 12:11pm
SFMom's picture
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Joined: 11/27/2006 - 09:00

Here's what we've been doing for years:
1. Buy them a bunch of treats from Vermont Nut Free Chocolates and (more recently since I discovered them) Panhandle Premium in Candada.
2. When we go Trick-or-Treating, my kids try to choose candy that they know they can eat. Mainly sugar candies such as Starburst or certain lollipops or Pixie Stix, etc. Sometimes of course they don't have a choice so they take what they're given.
3. When we get home, we discard what they can't eat, and I give them the nut-free treats that I bought for them. Along with any sugar-based candies they got, this is usually enough.
4. Also, I never buy Trick-or-Treat candy (to give out at our door) that my kids can't eat. So, they get to keep whatever is left from that!

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 3:16pm
jw's picture
jw
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Joined: 06/29/2003 - 09:00

I also check out the Halloween candy packs a few weeks early at the store. Our preschool teachers asked for ideas and that way I could be prepared for their questions and know what our options were even if the little packages weren't labeled. Be really careful if they are multiple sizes/packages though to read each one. DD (no allergies) is 9 and DS is 5 with milk, egg, peanut and tree nut allergies. Adding in the milk really limits his candy choices so the list I can OK in the store isn't too big. A few neighbors will provide a non-candy treat for DS, but we don't make a fuss although he might start making requests this year if he sees something is OK from the house and other items aren't. DD did that for him sometimes last year. Once they are home, I sort the safe and unsafe piles. DD gets to take only a few safe treats and all other safe candy is his. She gets most of the rest. I also usually pick up a box of the pumpkin Peeps for him and a couple Pez dispensers to round out his choices.

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 9:11pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

My kids have always gone trick or treating on Halloween. Ryan wears gloves and *tries* to pick out safe candy. If there isn't any, it's a thanks, but no thanks kind of thing.
We throw virtually everything out when we get home. It's swapped with safe candy from stores, VNF, Kellie's Candies, and other nut-free companies.
This is the way we've always done it and it keeps everyone happy.

Posted on: Mon, 08/13/2007 - 10:50pm
lilysmom's picture
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Joined: 07/20/2007 - 09:00

There's alot of throwing away of candy. I know in Vegas there is a dentist that when you bring your halloween candy to him he swaps it out for gift certificates to other places, bookstores etc based on how many pieces. I put all non-safe candy in a separate bag, box it and give it to my DD pre-school teacher who ships it to Iraq. We all need to be safe, I don't let the non-safe candy into my daughters candy bag, I take it put it into the non-safe bag tell her to say thank you and move on to the next house. If asked why at a particular house I tell them about her peanut allergy and what we are doing. It raises awareness to other parents and teaches my daughter the art of giving.

Posted on: Tue, 08/14/2007 - 12:36am
2BusyBoys's picture
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Joined: 09/03/2004 - 09:00

We allow the boys to go trick or treating (one w/ mfa, the other with nka). No touching/eating allowed while out.
We swap their bags for a small amount of safe candy and a toy when we get home.
All candy collected while trick or treating is sent to work with DH.
I don't trust that the "safe" candy in the bag isn't contaminated by the unsafe candy so we just eliminate the risk.
[This message has been edited by 2BusyBoys (edited August 14, 2007).]

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 10:16am
jmarcustry's picture
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Joined: 10/09/2000 - 09:00

dd loves trick or treating. although p.a. i let her collect the candy and it goes right in the bag. never touched by her or eaten..then dh and i go thru the candy and offer her money for it.(we have a big spare change jar and use that money to buy it back from her) and then when we have bought back the candy(5,10,15,25 cents worth each piece) she adds up her cash(great math lesson too! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]) and then we let her go to a store and buy a small item (ie..toy or a book) and that way she isnt really missing out on the trick or treat( secretly though she said she just likes getting dressed up..me too i love seeing her get all excited to dress up). and we get rid of all the candy we bought from her either throwing it away or dh brings it to work...
------------------
september 3,2006 ~september 3,2007..poohbear..its been almost a year since my heart was broken into a million pieces..i miss you so much... rest in peace...

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 11:02am
booandbrimom's picture
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Joined: 08/23/2000 - 09:00

In addition to the candy swap/present thing, we've always made a big deal out of the costume so the candy didn't seem like the biggest part of Halloween. (My son is allergic to milk as well as peanut - that's pretty much everything in the basket.)
When he was 4, I made a train out of his wagon, complete with control board and whistle. He enjoyed getting pulled around the neighborhood as much as collecting the candy.
Next year, it was a spaceship. That one was a trick!
Years 8 and 9, we did the money for FAAN thing.
He's 12 now and done with Halloween, and honestly I'm glad.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 11:47am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

FAAN is running a halloween fundraiser this year -- if you visit their website they will send you collection boxes for "Trick or Treat for Food Allergy Education." My son really wants to do this. I requested 5 boxes.
------------------
mom to Ari(7) - severe nut allergies, asthma, you name it - and Maya (10), mild excema

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 12:10am
mom2boys1975's picture
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Joined: 07/19/2007 - 09:00

I hope FAAN continues to do the collecting $ thing. I'm afraid at 2 and 5 my children would think I needed a mental institution if I suggested they not collect candy and should get money for someone else instead.
In 1-2 years when they understand they collect money and what for and I give them candy then I think it would be great!
I'm loving all the suggestions though! You all are the best!

Posted on: Sun, 08/19/2007 - 12:56am
SafeMomNow's picture
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Joined: 05/17/2007 - 09:00

In past years we would let the kids go trick or treating and then take them in their costumes to the children's hospital. After the nurses checked out their candy they would tell us what rooms the candy could be delivered to. We would go to each room and "visit" and give out the candy. They kids had a blast, and they really felt good about the experience. We discovered peanutfreeplanet a few months ago that has chocolate bars, granola bars, candy from Canada so this year we will probably get candy from there and do the "exchange" idea as well as delivering the candy to the hospitalized children.

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You might have wondered if small amounts of an ingredient can be added to a food product without being declared on the food’s label. The FDA...

Is it possible to eat your way to a food allergy cure? Scientists think it’s...

There are many reasons why you may want to substitute almond flour for wheat flour in recipes. Of course, if you have a...

Not all oils are created equal. Some oils are high in saturated fats or in trans-fatty acids – not good for general health. Some are partially...

It may never be safe to begin feeding peanut butter to your baby or toddler if you have peanut allergies in your family. If either parent or one...

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What is a peanut allergy? It is a reaction that occurs in the body after eating peanuts or peanut...

For those with severe food allergies, flying can be a stressful process. Here are...

Approximately one out of 13 children under age 18 are allergic to at least one food, though many of them will outgrow their allergy by the age of...

Fact 1: Over a third of food allergy reactions happen after the first known oral...

The reason why some people are affected by allergies while others are not begins in their genes. Allergies are passed down from generation to...

Here’s a tip that might someday save your life, or that of a loved one: two to four times a year, review the proper way to use your epinephrine...

Lactose intolerance is the inability to process lactose, a sugar found in milk, caused by the lack of a needed enzyme. Those with lactose...

Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA)

An important part of peanut allergy awareness was enacted on January 1, 2006...

Tomato allergies are very rare. They are a "type 1 allergy," which means a contact allergy. When a person with this type of allergy touches a...

Milk allergies are becoming more common, especially in babies and small children. There is some confusion about what is an allergic reaction and...

Recognizing food allergy in babies or toddlers is not always easy, but there are specific risk factors and signs that parents and other caregivers...

Burlap bags are often used to store and ship coffee beans, potatoes, rice, seeds, nuts, and peanuts. They can be one of the disguised...

People with pollen allergies need to stay away from some foods. If you have allergic rhinitis in the spring or fall, you may not realize that you...

Of course, everyone knows that if you have a peanut allergy that you should avoid peanuts, peanut butter, peanut butter cookies and foods that...

Eating at a nut-free lunch table in school is a safety precaution that causes some students to feel isolated from their peers. Unfortunately,...