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Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 10:26am
Jana R's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] It's also so [i]backwards[/i] to publish a mission statement unless it's the [i]status quo[/i] already. Not needing [i]infiltration[/i]....depending on the luck of getting a [i]volunteer[/i] who's willing to back it up.
Backwards, I tell ya.
[/b]
Wouldn't that be great if that were the case in reality? [i]in a perfect world . . . .[/i]
I've also seen issues in churches and PTSA (just two that come to the top of my head) that have written verbiage that needs someone to step to the plate to make it true for a particular situation. Scouts, churches, PTSA programs coordinated by time strapped volunteers - maybe with agendas of their own maybe not (but then when I volunteer for something, don't I have an agenda? Sure, I try to be fair . . . ) When someone says to a volunteer leader, you should be doing it this way yet doesn't volunteer to make so just sounds like whiners. I'm sure it's happened to all of us in our various leadership roles forced on us when someone else wanted you to take on their agenda yet didn't want to step to the plate in a leadership role. Doesn't go over well. Nobody else will fight your battle. Right or wrong.
I'm just sayin' . . . .

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 11:46am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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I hear ya, Jana. And I agree-- to a point. I have tried to "volunteer" our way into inclusion in a few cases. AND been thoroughly rebuffed. I might have even had my feelings deeply hurt if I hadn't (as MB evidently has [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ) learned that particular lesson early on. It is a very painful lesson to learn as a child, I know. But the nice thing is that resiliance is a more useful trait as an adult than conformity. (Baaaaa-aaaa.)
Some people just don't like being told ANYTHING by an "outsider." Even one who wants to volunteer.
But I understand that there are cases where your other social opportunities may be so limited that GS offers one of the few options. In that case, I guess you have to fight for it.
I personally wouldn't. But that is my hang-up about cookie sales. In our area, you are obligated to sell, and I will not have it. I know some of the local leaders, and they [i]are[/i] good people... but GS isn't a public institution. In other words, you can't FORCE them to do it.

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 12:36pm
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It will go well or it will not. I will not be fighting hard to make GS the right thing for my dd. Either it is, or it isn't. She has enough interests as it is. She wanted to do it, and we have given her the opportunity. In our community, it does not seem huge, not at our school, anyway. This one troop of 12 is it for the moment, out of 3 classes at our grade level. So there are around 48 gals declining to join.
Dd will not be an outcast. At least not because of GS, anyway, LOL! becca

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 12:48pm
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guess i'm lucky that girlscouts are not a big deal in our area. i don't know a single one of my two PA girls' friends who belong.

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 12:50pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Jana R:
[b] Wouldn't that be great if that were the case in reality? [i]in a perfect world . . . .[/i]
I've also seen issues in churches and PTSA (just two that come to the top of my head) that have written verbiage that needs someone to step to the plate to make it true for a particular situation. Scouts, churches, PTSA programs coordinated by time strapped volunteers - maybe with agendas of their own maybe not (but then when I volunteer for something, don't I have an agenda? Sure, I try to be fair . . . ) When someone says to a volunteer leader, you should be doing it this way yet doesn't volunteer to make so just sounds like whiners. I'm sure it's happened to all of us in our various leadership roles forced on us when someone else wanted you to take on their agenda yet didn't want to step to the plate in a leadership role. Doesn't go over well. Nobody else will fight your battle. Right or wrong.
I'm just sayin' . . . .
[/b]
Hey, sure as **** it can be reality [i]and[/i] backwards. Completely agree......the world is littered with examples. Just because someone doesn't give a round of applause condoning them, doesn't mean they are whiners. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 1:00pm
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krc
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Girl Scouts are not a big deal around here either. My dd not being a part of this organization will never make her an "Outcast". Please....
What are we feeding our children that they feel they have to part of this to be accepted?
I'm sorry...don't mean to seem angry but the NUMBER ONE thing I try to teach my child is to be her own person. She has already learned this lesson...the first time she couldn't eat the cake, or the cupcake. We don't all have to be the same. KWIM? And that is ok.

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 1:14pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Corvallis Mom:
[b]I hear ya, Jana. And I agree-- to a point. I have tried to "volunteer" our way into inclusion in a few cases. AND been thoroughly rebuffed.[/b]
WRT: "volunteering"
oddly enough, I spoke with a parent at my child's school recently regarding a bi-monthly school function I am (or was) supposed to be contacted about in order to help plan and make "safe". Apparently this person jumped the gun, and planned it anyway, begging forgiveness after the fact. ie: "Can't you just keep him home on those days??" when I informed them the selections would have to change if they were found to be "unsafe".
I'd still be p***** off if I didn't realize people can't help their character flaws. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
Anyway, once again, the choice of establishments picked to service these bi-monthly functions are very [i]cliquey[/i] and lean heavily on those establishments run by families in the district. (actually two different functions for a total of 4 days a month). Is it any wonder, despite the IEP considerations directly involving me, were [i]overlooked[/i].
This person made the mistake of asking me why I hadn't [i]volunteered[/i] to help plan. I had, they just [i]overlooked[/i] me. I volunteered to give an "educational" talk on LTFA (actually was asked by the principal). They never followed up despite my reminders. Maybe they expected me to forget.
I volunteered for the "Local Wellness Policy" committees in our district (and at the cooperative level). I volunteered with the Co-op Coordinator, the district super, and the principal of my child's school last year for this "Local Wellness Policy". I am an RN, a parent of two special needs children, a parent of a children with LTFA, and a member of the district community. Despite what I saw as obvious qualifications, and numerous attempts to volunteer on these projects, [i]I wasn't chosen[/i]. No followup whatsoever.
The list could go on, but I just gotta laugh at the idea that "volunteering" automatically gives you consideration for [i]anything[/i].
Our district is advertising for substitute RN's. I'd be one lonely snowball if I thought for [i]a second[/i] any resume or application I submitted would receive any consideration. I mean, I'm not even a member of the softball league! (again, dripping in sarcasm)
[i]I might apply just for kicks.[/i]
and keep calling and calling and calling. leave oodles of messages.
and then wait for them to send home those notices "Substitue RN's needed" once again. (evil grin).
I might make it my pet project. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
Say "volunteer" again. I need the laugh. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
Oh, and I have "volunteered" on numerous occassions to come in and scrub down and disinfect my child's classroom (this year his homeroom) each year. (I use FA as an [i]excuse[/i]).
I mean, the condition of the desks just makes my skin crawl. Last year, there were smears on everyone. So gross. Apparently there have been cutbacks on custodial availability. Daily routine cleaning is no longer "the standard".
I wasn't taken up on that offer either. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
But thanks for the smile. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 1:27pm
MommaBear's picture
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I still don't get it. If "Scouts" in general are supposed to be of such moral temperance, this discussion shouldn't even be happening. It seems to happen a lot.

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 2:10pm
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krc
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MB- seriously!!
It's too much to include those who actually need the accommodations and look at you or whoever else w/credentials. But- we are all willing to educate and offer so much and I really feel like most people just do not want to deal with any of it. In my opinion- no matter what I put in place- no one wants to accommodate due to allergies. Something they already know and recognize as a disability YES, an allergy... well....I'm having a hard time. And no...I've never cared if I "fit" into the clique or not. People really don't enjoy that either actually.
[This message has been edited by krc (edited October 09, 2006).]
[This message has been edited by krc (edited October 09, 2006).]

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 5:02pm
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[b]I mean, I'm not even a member of the softball league! (again, dripping in sarcasm)[/b]
Was reading along, doing my silent nods and agreements here and there, but I got to this and I just nearly came out of my seat! No &*%&ing sh$^!!!!! I tell ya, sometimes I think we are living in the same neighborhood! AMEN sista!

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 6:00pm
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It's too bad that Girl Scouts are such a problem. My son has had such a positive experience with Cub Scouts. They asked that no one bring peanut products to the Pack meetings and they even gave him his own refrigerator space and let him use the microwave so my husband could make his food separately at overnight camp.
My husband was den leader (until this year), and think that did make a big difference in accomplishing the needed accommodations.

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 10:21pm
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I feel terrible that Scouts is seen as such a negative. My son just earned his Eagle Scout and my daughter just earned her Bronze award and is now a Cadette. Both have been in since Tiger Cubs and Daisies.It has been a tremendous experience for both.They are BIG on volunteering and helping others always.They are both EXCELLENT public speakers. They are both VERY confident.I attribute this directly to their scout experiences.It is not just them -I see it in the others in their troops. Their scout friends have been solid friends.Those of you with middle school girls will appreciate how wonderful this is. There are several girls with food allergies in her troop but this was explained and embraced and dealt with.I help when I can (not a lot) with the girls troop, but now that they are older it is girl driven.I am going to see if they want me to help with the PAL Patch Program.It has been my experience that when it seems others are running the show their way, in reality if I get in there, they are really greatful for help and suggestions and for the break.I just want others to realize that many wonderful lifelong skills can be gained from Scouts.

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 10:41pm
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b] AMEN sista! [/b]
[url="http://members.aol.com/nonstopny/easter/messiah.htm"]http://members.aol.com/nonstopny/easter/messiah.htm[/url]

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 11:00pm
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Mimom, yes, it seems you have found a good thing. As I have stated, it really seems to vary widely. Quite alot of inconsistency.
Again, my rant was because it was bluntly told to my leaders they would not be accomodating nut allergies at the function, yes there were nuts in the trail mix, and allergic girls "were welcome to pack their own food." Duh! Like we need a welcome mat to bring food that won't kill us. It is the fact that this is the snack for the entire event and will be all over the place. No thanks. No effort put forth and no desire to put forth any effort to try to come up with a safer snack or trail mix. None. Just an attitude.
Oh, then they banned Santa and decided against any Winter events because of all the mixed cultures in our community and someone being offended by anything they could think of. Cultural fair was nixed. They sound pretty rigid and inflexible to me. Here, anyway.
My dd gains loads of self confidence in Piano lessons, and recitals, doing watercolor classes, playing soccer, and various other group activites. I hear martial arts are wonderful too. Might give it a try one of these days, but she is so busy already. Its just good to be a kid sometimes too. becca

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 11:03pm
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Quote:Originally posted by nancy023:
[b]
My husband was den leader (until this year), and think that did make a big difference in accomplishing the needed accommodations. [/b]
In kindergarten when we first moved in, they came around from the park district signing children up for [i]soccer[/i]. My first child, I thought, "Oh, alright."
My husband, visionary that he is, volunteered to be assistant coach in order to.........[i]run interference[/i] for our son. (Not too coordinated, slower physically, very unstreetwise, and um......we are all outcasts by nature. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img])
Anywhooo, my husband, who had never been in sports of any kind as a child or adult, never had been to *any* kind of sporting event, and who was very independent and [i]self reliant[/i] [b]volunteered[/b].
I sat there on the sidelines that year cringing as other parents heckled my son (who wasn't the worlds fastest runner) and other less athletically endowed five and six year olds that season. The offenders didn't take kindly to gentle reprimands from the assistant coach to [i]lay off[/i] the children. I always spent the remainder of the afternoon restoring my son's self esteem. It was a disaster.
I thought my husband coached with a level head, and with fairness to a [i]fault[/i]. Bless him, he called the last game off when it started to downpour on a frigid afternoon. Called it a draw.
You'd think he gave Texas back. The parents were rabid.
You know, we kinda new what we were in for, but we didn't want to force our children to live by our experiences. Pay for our sins.
That was our first mistake. Now, we just fill their days with things [i]they really want to do[/i], instead of things they [i]think[/i] they [i]should[/i] want to do. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]
To call it rewarding would be an understatement.
And I can't think of even *one* activity my children are taken with that involves [i]competitiveness[/i].
Oh, and for anyone interested, the "band" thing seems to be working out.
I mean, I think it's rather statistically flawed to think *every* child should want to, or even will excell, at something like soccer or any other highly over-rated activity. [i]Let alone enjoy it.[/i]
OOO. time to reraise a thread.

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2006 - 11:08pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Mimom:
[b]They are BIG on volunteering and helping others always.They are both EXCELLENT public speakers. They are both VERY confident.I attribute this directly to their scout experiences........[/b]
my children are too. except it's not from Scouts. it's just who they are. especially the "EXCELLENT public speakers" part. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]
These things are not something limited to "Scouts". To some, it is a natural happenstance.
Quote:[b]....I just want others to realize that many wonderful lifelong skills can be gained from Scouts.[/b]
again, some just come equipped that way, and if not, I don't for one minute believe "Scouts" is the [i]only[/i] route to honing these skills. Or even a guarantee. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Maybe Scouts just attracts those who are already there...
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited October 09, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 10/09/2006 - 12:55am
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KRC
I want my child to be her own person too...
but, in my child's private Catholic school, *every* little girl grades 4 and under belong to a troop. The father daughter dance held at the school that all of the little girls attend every fall is ONLY open to girl scouts. They all wear their vests on scout meeting day every month, etc. It is a huge deal at the school.
It is not coming from ME that it's outcast status not to be in GS, it's the way it's set up at our school. I am not big on conformity and there are other things to do, but scouting at our school is practically another class at school the way it is so indoctrinated into all of the social events.
I will never make a social point on my child's back. Never. I might have when I was younger but I've gotten more practical in my old age.
She wants to do this and all of the little girls do it. It's the main way those grades make friends at the school. It's basically overrated, but not harmful. If it was drinking and drugs we are talking about, that would be different. But this kind of conformity smoothes the way for my child - and I am ok with that.

Posted on: Mon, 10/09/2006 - 1:15am
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Whether or not it is harmful depends on the troop and the leaders. When dd was in Girl Scouts, they had Saint Patricks Day party in a BAR. Yes, you read that correctly, it was a bar, actually an Irish pub. And of course it had peanut bowls and residue everywhere, so dd was excluded, but come on, what are they doing having an event for 7 year old girls in a bar?
About the outcast thing, at our school, almost every girl in first grade was wearing a brownie uniform on Wednesdays. That was why I even made the effort to put dd in. Because of the uniform, it was very clear who was in and who wasn`t.
About the self confidence and speaking skills, again it depends on the troop and the leaders. All I saw was a bunch of out of control, poorly behaved girls, overpowering a few well behaved ones (mine was one of the well behaved ones). Dd got far more self confidence and speaking skills from her acting and modeling than she ever did from Girl Scouts. There are many ways to acquire those skills other than scouts.
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited October 09, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 10/09/2006 - 1:50am
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]About the outcast thing, at our school, almost every girl in first grade was wearing a brownie uniform on Wednesdays. That was why I even made the effort to put dd in. Because of the uniform, it was very clear who was in and who wasn`t.
[/b]
our school district [i]outlaws[/i] identifying group "uniforms".
They consider it a [i]distraction[/i].
The dress code is strictly [i]enforced[/i]. For example: No wearing of any hats inside the building, including [i]hoodies[/i].
This is a [i]public school[/i]. Shorts can be no more than just above the knee. No mini skirts, no sleeveless shirts (we have air conditioning). They also reserve the right to send someone home for wearing anything they deem [i]age inappropriate[/i] clothing. Including stuff people obviously have [i]grown out of[/i].
I'm all for it. The girl next to my son in class doesn't need to wear [i]fishnets[/i], anymore than he needs to wear chaps and a cowboy hat. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
I'm bracing myself for an all out ban on camo soon......my youngest son has amassed an entire closet full of the stuff.

Posted on: Mon, 10/09/2006 - 9:15am
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] In kindergarten when we first moved in, they came around from the park district signing children up for [i]soccer[/i]. My first child, I thought, "Oh, alright."
My husband, visionary that he is, volunteered to be assistant coach in order to.........[i]run interference[/i] for our son. (Not too coordinated, slower physically, very unstreetwise, and um......we are all outcasts by nature. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img])
Anywhooo, my husband, who had never been in sports of any kind as a child or adult, never had been to *any* kind of sporting event, and who was very independent and [i]self reliant[/i] [b]volunteered[/b].
I sat there on the sidelines that year cringing as other parents heckled my son (who wasn't the worlds fastest runner) and other less athletically endowed five and six year olds that season. The offenders didn't take kindly to gentle reprimands from the assistant coach to [i]lay off[/i] the children. I always spent the remainder of the afternoon restoring my son's self esteem. It was a disaster.
[/b]
I've seen nothing but understanding and kindness by parents and coaches of kids that age in our soccer club. They even suspended the use of a whistle for one under 6 team that had a child with an autism spectrum disorder who was bothered by the loud sound.
Now, the older kids' parents can be vicious. My eight year old had a run-in with some awful moms on travel soccer last year, but he somehow survived and has really improved this year.
I agree, the "popular" activities aren't for every kid. My mother in law has often lamented that one grandson didn't play any sports and his parents dressed him so nerdy. He's now an accomplished violist and just received notification that he is being recognized as a National Merit Scholar. I do think it helps with the peanut allergy issue to volunteer in most cases.

Posted on: Fri, 10/13/2006 - 12:36pm
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In support of girlscouts... My dd is one and loves it. It has been great socially for her. Her leaders try very hard to accomodate her allergy. They asked about how to use the epipen and what to look for. Its the leaders that make the difference- don't knock the entire organization. Education is the key. We need to help educate others.

Posted on: Fri, 10/13/2006 - 10:36pm
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also in suport of girl scouts. my daughter just joined this past week. im going to be the second parent in the room. a co-leader of sorts,
before i signed krisin up and volentiered, i had to know if it was going to be peanut free because im going to have to bring my son sometimes...
she emmedatily said no problem.
so we will see..
i was a girl scout for 9 years, i missed my 10 year pin by one year. went to church camp that last year and discovered boys!!!
i was so happy when i found out they were starting a daisy troop i our school district.
however i do find it disturbing that the council is so unacomadating for a ltfa. and that the leaders of certin troops are acting in such a manor that will affect the health and safty of there members.
i would bring this to the attention of the council leaders in your aera and if that dosnt work go with someone over there heads.
because quite frankly i think its BULL DOOKIE that you or any one else has to take that kind of garbage. and that a cupple of bad seeds will spoil the whole girl scout experance for you and your daughter.
this turned out to be much longer than i expected.
just my 2 cents
erin

Posted on: Fri, 10/13/2006 - 11:02pm
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As far as today goes, my leaders were sympathetic, and it may be only their two girls even going. It was last minute, and there is a conflicting school event which sounds like a blast.
Two schools buddied up(ours and the other school is one I love) and have faculty-parent rock bands, and games and such. It is super fun for the kids to see the principle rockin' out in a band, LOL!
That is if we even make it as dh just came in on the red-eye after a week away, showered and is off to soccer! We may all just crash for the afternoon!
I am going to keep a log of these events, and I do have a buddy mom, whose dd is in the troop with PA, and very proactive on the allergy issues. So, together, perhaps we can do something if it is an ongoing issue at council level. becca

Posted on: Fri, 10/13/2006 - 11:42pm
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Quote:Originally posted by smudgesgarden:
[b]
however i do find it disturbing that the council is so unacomadating for a ltfa. and that the leaders of certin troops are acting in such a manor that will affect the health and safty of there members.
i would bring this to the attention of the council leaders in your aera and if that dosnt work go with someone over there heads.
because quite frankly i think its BULL DOOKIE that you or any one else has to take that kind of garbage. and that a cupple of bad seeds will spoil the whole girl scout experance for you and your daughter.
[/b]
Here's the problem with the [i]chain of command[/i] (ie, what you are recommending: "go with someone over their heads"). In [i]volunteer[/i] organizations that depend heavily upon the gratuitous service of their membership, the chain of command often works in [i]the wrong direction[/i]. Too many people "in charge". [i]A conflict of interest[/i].
It's really difficult, if not near impossible, to enforce or bring to fruition, [i]a mission statement[/i] without everyone being "on board".
I've got to ask myself: Do I want to support an organization and invest myself in it with not only *my* time and energy [i]and hope[/i] but my [i]child's[/i] as well?" This is where, in my parenting crossroads, [i]anticipatory guidance[/i] comes in handy. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] Good judgement, I mean.
My plate is already full wading through the "volunteer" organizations coagulated by "involved" parents enmasse throughout my children's schools. Unpoliced and rampant throughout my children's schools weaving their tentacles "up the chain of command" under the guise of "fundraising". [i](urge to vomit)[/i]
Honestly? It's to the point my school smirks at my requests to enforce a [b]Federally Promulgated[/b] Law meant to protect my child. It's almost as if I need a lawyer and a Due Process hearing to get [i]the simplest[/i] of accommodations delivered. Some good all that fundraising is going to do them if [i]lawyers[/i] are involved...
But honestly? I don't think the fundraising is the payoff. For the school or the parents.
In our district, I'll be willing to guess most, if not all families could just afford to donate a small amount each year to the district without all the exchange of material goods and [i]time[/i].Material goods mostly being [i]food[/i]. Junk food. Probably less money delivered that way would go alot further than requiring I spend "x" amount of dollars (usually an overinflated amount) on an item I don't need and surely my school doesn't need. You know, no "middle man", less money leaving my pocket, but more for the school.
The school administration, I think, just doesn't have the wherewithal (in addition to the high turnover rate of staff) to deal with the social networks such "volunteer" organizations choke....I mean, [i]embrace[/i] the school with.
Lately, I'm having trouble remembering if my child is leaving for a [i]carnival[/i] each day, or school. Considering the amount of [i]non-essential[/i] food items present on school grounds each day.
I'm waiting for the cotton candy spinner replace the front desk soon....

Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2006 - 2:47am
Jana R's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
But honestly? I don't think the fundraising is the payoff. For the school or the parents.
In our district, I'll be willing to guess most, if not all families could just afford to donate a small amount each year to the district without all the exchange of material goods and [i]time[/i].Material goods mostly being [i]food[/i]. Junk food. Probably less money delivered that way would go alot further than requiring I spend "x" amount of dollars (usually an overinflated amount) on an item I don't need and surely my school doesn't need. You know, no "middle man", less money leaving my pocket, but more for the school.
[/b]
The high school my son went to did a "pass the hat" at "Back to School" night instead of any other fundraising and it was widely embraced! I was so excited when my daughter's elementary school announced they were going to do this but I guess it wasn't as successful in part (IMHO) because they didn't believe folks would kick in enough and already had other fundraising (running alongside the "pass the hat" night). So we're back to being saddled with other time consuming fund raising [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2006 - 4:11am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by nancy023:
[b] I've seen nothing but understanding and kindness by parents and coaches of kids that age in our soccer club. They even suspended the use of a whistle for one under 6 team that had a child with an autism spectrum disorder who was bothered by the loud sound.
Now, the older kids' parents can be vicious. My eight year old had a run-in with some awful moms on travel soccer last year, but he somehow survived and has really improved this year.
[/b]
[b]Uniontown, PA[/b]:
[url="http://www.wral.com/sports/10068922/detail.html"]http://www.wral.com/sports/10068922/detail.html[/url]
[i]Disgusting.[/i]
edit to add disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. I do not guarantee the accuracy, currentness, content, or applicability of the link in this post. While individual mileage may vary, I remember [i]vividly[/i] the gym teacher just standing by while as the opening whistle blew during Dodge Ball and every ball hurled at me simultaneously. What an asinine game to organize as part of "Physical Education". Dorks.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited October 14, 2006).]

Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2006 - 2:36pm
nancy023's picture
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Joined: 12/12/2002 - 09:00

That story about the evil coach of the autistic boy has been big news, here. I don't think it's the norm, and will stick by my guns in saying that volunteering can usually help. I agree that dodge ball can be a frightening experience (flashbacks of manly girls hurling kickballs that have gone half flat are going through my head).

Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2006 - 10:04pm
Christabelle's picture
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Joined: 10/03/2004 - 09:00

We don't do soccer, either. I think it's insane when parents scream at the kids who are 6 or 7. That doesn't happen much in my community, just a tad, but I've seen it go on in the teams that they play.
My daughter and son are in tennis, swimming, she is in ballet, they are both in martial arts, she is in Girl Scouts, and riding and violin start in the Spring for her (he is too young still for Boy Scouts, or music or riding.)
No one screams at the tennis players...LOL. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Also, it's indoors and doesn't involve long travel times and the tennis outfits are cute (LOL!) And there's this: they can play it their whole lives. I see the gamut at our club - 4 year olds to 80 year olds.
I will get them invovled in golf, too.

Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2006 - 11:45pm
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Those of you who have had a good experience with your GS troop making accommodations, do you also have a pretty good experience with your school making PA accommodations? Or similarly, those who have been involved in non-accommodating GS troops, was your experience the same at your school?
Since (volunteer) troop leaders are usually parents from the [i]school community[/i], I wonder if there's any relationship. . . .
Mariah was a GS for 3 years, but I was never a leader or any type of volunteer with the troop because I didn't feel the need. The parents were already very knowledgeable about LTFAs because the school (via [i]us[/i]) had begun educating the students and parents. The girls and troop leader were already trained/accommodating.
I'm currently a "co" troop leader for my younger non-PA daughter. She likes GS because she thinks it's [i]fun.[/i] IMO, 'scouting' is a very tiny aspect of our group. . . it's just a monthly 'activity club' where the girls do fun crafts or sports and get to collect cool looking badges. Very little to do with 'scouting' at all. Looking at our schedule this year: going to "Flicka" at the movie theater, ice skating, 'math fun' (badge), bowling, bike riding, 'Science in Action' (badge), 'careers' (badge), "friends are fun' (badge), the April Showers collection and cookie sales. IMO, none of this really has much at all to do with 'scouting' or 'camping'. Just a girl's club, IMO. <> Nothing one couldn't do without.

Posted on: Sun, 10/15/2006 - 11:42am
smudgesgarden's picture
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Joined: 02/26/2006 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
Honestly? It's to the point my school smirks at my requests to enforce a [b]Federally Promulgated[/b] Law meant to protect my child. [/b]
mb
why does this not suprise me!!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
no tone intended!!
you dont strike me as the kind of person who will let someone walk all over you. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
girl scouts for me was such a positive experance and i realy want my daughter to have fun and make the kind of friends i had. now remember my daughter isnt pa....
i am worried about the time when they start selling cookies, and from what i understand they now sell nuts, but i will cross that bridge when i come to it.
when its time for my son to join cub scouts that might be a diffrent can of worms!!!!
i am going to call the "leader" of our local girl scout council on monday morning to find out about there policy with ltfa.
ill post her reply... hopefully its a good responce.
ps this post is kinda rambling ( i had a few beers, husband is away for the weekend and so are the kids!!) woo hoo
party at my house!
oh another thing, my sister brought up a question i want to post for responce...
sould i deny my non food allergy child from after school activites ie: girl scouts, just because my son is allergic to something??

Posted on: Sun, 10/15/2006 - 12:16pm
krc's picture
krc
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Joined: 01/16/2007 - 09:00

Smudgesgarden: To answer your sisters question- Of course not
We just have to make sure they are safe while they are there. Sometimes depending on who is running the after school activity-this can be an incredibly hard task. I do choose to try and educate and speak to whomever the after school program director is before I make a decision to send or not send dd. I do prefer activities where food is not involved!

Posted on: Mon, 10/16/2006 - 12:50am
smudgesgarden's picture
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Joined: 02/26/2006 - 09:00

yeah, i prefer activities where food isnt involed either. i was just wondering what everyone felt about it. id rather girl scouts didnt sell nuts. im not sure what we are going to do when that time comes.

Posted on: Mon, 10/16/2006 - 1:00am
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Yes, they do sell nuts. When our troop sold them, they passed out free samples in front of a store. Of course, dd could not participate in that. One of the leaders asked me to have dd do it and wear gloves, because if dd didn`t do it, "it wasn`t fair to the other girls". Let`s see, what about airborne, should I tell dd not to breathe while she is passing them out? I was told by people on this board that the nut sale is optional and the troop can decide to do it or not, unlike the cookie sale which all troops do. Our troop, of course, chose to do the nut sale, even with a pa child.
Gail W., to answer your question, our school had great accomodations for the pa. We were the ones who were offerred a 504 without even asking....so no correlation with the accomodations in Girl Scouts.

Posted on: Mon, 04/02/2007 - 4:02am
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Re-raising for PA-Mom.

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