What to do now?

Posted on: Fri, 09/07/2012 - 10:11am
amommyof3as's picture
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Joined: 09/07/2012 - 17:09

I need some advice where to go next on this crazy journey!! My youngest is 13 months and at 10month or so I gave him peanut butter and jelly not thinking anything of it because my older 2 had no problem at that age. Next thing I know he has huge red blotches all over his face. I called the dr and they walked my through how much benadryl to give him. I watched him like a hawk and haven't give him peanut butter since. I though while making his birthday cake put almond extract in his frosting, next morning the eczema patches on his legs were horribly red and had multiplied. We went to his 1 yr check up and the dr said they won't send him to the allergist because of his age and that they really wont test him, but to just keep up with what I've been doing by watching his food and making sure everything is nut free. He is also nursing still so I have always cut back on my nut intake. I just wish I knew for certain if he was or not, I just don't want to risk it by testing the theory by myself again. Our ped will give us an epi-pen for emergencies. Just were do I go from here??

Posted on: Sat, 09/08/2012 - 4:29am
coldfusion1205's picture
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Joined: 02/11/2012 - 10:39

Our son was 2 when he had his first reaction. We were also told to wait until he was older. When our son was 5 and about to enter kindergarten last year we finally took him to an allergist and had him tested. On a scale of 1-6 6 being the highest our son is a 6. I know it is scary at first but it does get easier. You will get comfortable with a routine of reading labels and watching what your son can and can not have. I do recommend having your son tested before he starts school and make sure you get all the proper medical forms from the school and take them with you so the doctor can fill them out at the appointment.
Mom of PA son

Posted on: Sat, 09/08/2012 - 8:17am
lilmjmay's picture
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Joined: 09/08/2012 - 14:51

I have a 14 year old,a 12 year old and a 20 month old. My two oldest are not allergy to anything as far as food or nut goes. However my youngest is in the worst way. The docs we're working with told us to trying give a youngest (who was then only 14 months) peanut butter to fatten her up because she's really under weight. I gave her 4 peanut butter flavored Cheerios and it almost killed her. She was rushed to the hopital where they worked on her for 4 hours. She was scratch tested at 16 months and tested positive for being severely allergic to peanuts/nuts. She can't even get the dust on her or the cross contaminated products. We now have a FAAN plan in place, we take Benadryl, asthma inhaler, and her Jr. EpiPen everywhere. We also have to carry antibacterial wet wipes with us and wipe everything down in public or even in some peoples houses even...like the toys. It's crazy and really scary.

Posted on: Wed, 09/19/2012 - 8:59am
Saralinda's picture
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Joined: 01/12/2004 - 09:00

Basically, you are doing everything right. You know he reacts to peanuts so avoid them and anything else he to which he reacts. I'm 61 and have been allergic all my life. No matter how much testing doctors offer, there is currently no cure. The only thing you can do is to keep a distance between your child and allergens. Some kids, I'm told, outgrow allergies. I'm still waiting and still avoiding peanuts. Avoidance is the only remedy. It does get easier. By the age of 5 or 6, he will be a member of your team. You and your child together can make life managable in a peanuty world.

Posted on: Wed, 09/19/2012 - 9:09am
Boston08's picture
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Joined: 01/18/2012 - 16:50

Get a new Dr. My second son was tested at 3 months.

Posted on: Wed, 09/19/2012 - 12:01pm
joannosha's picture
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Joined: 05/25/2011 - 10:51

not sure what this dr's decision is in not testing him. since your son has already had a previous reaction, it would be safest for them to draw blood and test the blood instead of giving him the scratch test which would expose him to a possible severe reaction. it would be best for all to know for sure what he is and what he isn't allergic to and you should definitely have an epi-pen as these allergies most often get more severe with each exposure. i don't want to scare anyone' but in my son's case his reaction was quicker and not handled with just the benadryl after the first time. find a dr who is willing to test him and get him the epi-pen. it is possible to enjoy a normal childhood including school, playdates and camp with the knowledge you will get by researching this. my son has not had any reaction in 5 1/2 yrs now. all the best to you and your family.

Posted on: Wed, 09/19/2012 - 1:04pm
MomofBoys's picture
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Joined: 09/19/2012 - 19:54

Dear amommyof3as,
I was so compelled by your question that I registered for this forum just to respond to your post/question. My 12 month has a diagnosed peanut allergy. He has his first reaction at 7 months of age, when some combination of the rest of us (Mommy, Daddy, and 2-year old brother) touched him after we ate peanut butter. My 7 month old broke out in hives all over his body. We immediately suspected a peanut allergy, but waited until his 9 month doctor's appointment to talk to his doctor (in the meantime, we removed all peanut products from the house and were super careful that he didn't come into contact with peanuts).
At his 9 month doctor's appointment, I was a bit surprised by how seriously his doctor took the situation we described. She immediately referred us to an allergist and stressed the importance of getting an official diagnosis and a prescription for an Epi-pen. We made the appointment and our fears were confirmed - pretty serious allergy to peanuts!
Since then, we've had another scare. I bought a book from a yard sale and gave it to my now 2 1/2 year old before disinfecting it. From there, it ended up with my younger son and he immediately broke out in hives (I discovered peanut butter residue on it). Fortunately, he didn't ingest it and didn't have a severe reaction, but this is just an example of how challenging it can be to prevent contact with an allergen. If you little one has an allergy, it's critical that you have not one, but two Epi-pens with you wherever you go. Only a doctor can prescribe this.
Your 13 month old is definitely not too young to be tested! If your doctor won't budge - try a new one.
Good luck!!! My thoughts are with you.

Posted on: Wed, 09/19/2012 - 1:08pm
MomofBoys's picture
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Joined: 09/19/2012 - 19:54

Dear amommyof3as,
I was so compelled to respond to your question that I registered for this forum just to be able to respond to your post/question. My 12 month has a diagnosed peanut allergy. He has his first reaction at 7 months of age, when some combination of the rest of us (Mommy, Daddy, and 2-year old brother) touched him after we ate peanut butter and must have had some oil on our hands. My 7 month old broke out in hives all over his body. We immediately suspected a peanut allergy, but waited until his 9 month doctor's appointment to talk to his doctor (in the meantime, we removed all peanut products from the house and were super careful that he didn't come into contact with peanuts).
At his 9 month doctor's appointment, I was a bit surprised by how seriously his doctor took the situation we described. She immediately referred us to an allergist and stressed the importance of getting an official diagnosis and a prescription for an Epi-pen. We made the appointment and our fears were confirmed - pretty serious allergy to peanuts!
Since then, we've had another scare. I bought a book from a yard sale and gave it to my now 2 1/2 year old before disinfecting it (huge mistake!). From there, it ended up with my younger son and he immediately broke out in hives (I discovered peanut butter residue on it). Fortunately, he didn't ingest it and didn't have a severe reaction, but this is just an example of how challenging it can be to prevent contact with an allergen. If you little one has an allergy, it's critical that you have not one, but two Epi-pens with you wherever you go. Only a doctor can prescribe this.
Your 13 month old is definitely not too young to be tested! If your doctor won't budge - try a new one.
Good luck!!! My thoughts are with you.
I still feel like I'm in the beginning stages of learning about and navigating this peanut allergy and have learned that the Epi-pen can save lives!

Posted on: Thu, 09/20/2012 - 3:23am
Saralinda's picture
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Joined: 01/12/2004 - 09:00

Ok, I see that the administrators have tried to deal with the hijacking of these forums, but the off topic posts have returned. Can't something be done?

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