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Posted on: Mon, 10/13/2014 - 11:52am
AmberC.'s picture
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Joined: 10/21/2013 - 15:35

Scientists are facing an incredible amount of pressure these days. What about the Children's Medical Safety Research Institute? Have you tried contacting them? http://www.cmsri.org/

Posted on: Mon, 10/13/2014 - 12:18pm
vinucube's picture
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Joined: 10/12/2014 - 11:21

Dr. Carol,
Nobel Prize winner Charles Richet established more than a hundred years ago that injecting ANY protein into the body would result in sensitization. Subsequent exposure to that protein would result in an allergic reaction that he termed anaphylaxis.
So in theory, any protein in a vaccine will cause sensitization. The only open question is, how much allergen protein is needed to cause clinical allergy.
The FDA has not determined if such a safe level exists.
The FDA wrote to me:
"There is not, as you describe it, an FDA determined safe amount of a potentially allergenic ingredient contained in a vaccine. The FDA reviews vaccine composition in its entirety to ensure the safety and efficacy of the vaccine."
Since the FDA has not determined a safe limit nor does it enforce one, vaccines must be among the prime suspects for food allergy. Food allergy has been labeled the enigmatic epidemic. It will remain an enigmatic epidemic if we refuse to even consider the prime suspect as a possible cause.
Many varied and independent instances of allergy are all tied to the same mechanism Richet discovered.
I have placed many references here to peer-reviewed published articles.
http://foodallergycauses.wordpress.com/
This study below shows that an influenza vaccine causes synthesis of anti-influenza IgE, in other words influenza allergy in 100% of the patients. So, vaccines WORK because they cause you to develop allergy to the virus. Anti-influenza IgE is therefore a good thing. But the ovalbumin injected along with the viral protein can result in anti-ovalbumin IgE and that is the problem.
Smith-Norowitz TA, Wong D, Kusonruksa M, Norowitz KB, Joks R, Durkin HG, Bluth MH. Long Term Persistence of IgE Anti-Influenza Virus Antibodies in Pediatric and Adult Serum Post Vaccination with Influenza Virus Vaccine. Int J Med Sci 2011; 8(3):239-244. doi:10.7150/ijms.8.239. Available from http://www.medsci.org/v08p0239.htm

Posted on: Mon, 10/13/2014 - 12:29pm
AmberC.'s picture
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Joined: 10/21/2013 - 15:35

Yes! and yes! But if the FDA is not enforcing its own limits then people need to bring this to the attention of their elected official.

Posted on: Wed, 10/15/2014 - 2:09am
pxleal's picture
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Joined: 01/20/2011 - 13:20

I forgot to mention I had started a second petition on change.org, this time asking for more research for prevention and treatment of peanut allergy. Please sign and share with your contacts.
https://www.change.org/p/kathleen-sebelius-mpa-support-research-to-prevent-and-advance-treatment-of-peanut-and-treenut-allergies

Posted on: Wed, 10/15/2014 - 2:36am
pxleal's picture
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Joined: 01/20/2011 - 13:20

I did start a new petition, here is the link if you would like to sign and pass along. Thanks.
https://www.change.org/p/kathleen-sebelius-mpa-support-research-to-prevent-and-advance-treatment-of-peanut-and-treenut-allergies

Posted on: Wed, 10/15/2014 - 2:43am
AmberC.'s picture
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Joined: 10/21/2013 - 15:35

Respectfully Dr. Carol, back in the late 1980s and early 1990s antibiotics were given out like candy for things like common colds. It is only through the questioning of the purpose of antibiotics have we come to realize they are not effective for the treatment of viruses. Likewise, science is the pursuit of truth. If vaccines are playing a role in the food allergy epidemic then we need to explore that through thorough study. Why are we so afraid to look at vaccines? And why should any pharmaceutical product be free of liability? Taking such an important product like vaccines and given the manufacturer freedom from liability is asking for trouble.

Posted on: Thu, 10/16/2014 - 3:40am
pxleal's picture
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Joined: 01/20/2011 - 13:20

I just found this article detecting peanut and other food allergens in medications. To me this means one could theoretically become sensitized by these traces of allergens, although possibly not have overt allergic reactions. The full-text would be interesting to see which pharmaceutical drugs were tested.
Kokuritsu Iyakuhin Shokuhin Eisei Kenkyusho Hokoku. 2012;(130):58-65.
[Studies on the food allergenic proteins contained in pharmaceutical excipients].
[Article in Japanese]
Sakai S1, Adachi R, Miyazaki T, Aso Y, Okuda H, Teshima R.
Author information
Abstract
Most drugs contain pharmaceutical excipients. These are pharmacologically inactive substances used as vehicles for the active ingredients of a medication. Some of these pharmaceutical excipients are produced from allergenic foods (e.g., milk, egg, peanut, soybean, and sesame) and removing proteins completely from such excipients is difficult. Therefore, if individuals with food allergy consume drugs containing allergenic food-derived excipients, eliminating the risk of developing specific allergic symptoms induced by them may not be possible. We determined the levels of proteins in pharmaceutical excipients and ethical drugs (inhalants and injections) by spectrophotometric analyses. The level of protein in the pharmaceutical excipient lactose in each sample was approximately 1 mg/g. In the case of oils from soybeans, peanuts, and sesame in pharmaceutical excipients, proteins were detected in the range 7-9 microg/g sample. We also determined levels of allergenic proteins in pharmaceutical excipients and ethical drugs using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems. The milk proteins in lactose were detected in the range 1.39-13.07 microg/g. The results of this study suggest that physicians, patients with food allergies, pharmacists, and healthcare providers must pay attention to presence of potential impurities those may cause allergic symptoms in pharmaceutical products.
PMID: 23243989 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23243989

Posted on: Thu, 10/16/2014 - 4:20am
AmberC.'s picture
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Joined: 10/21/2013 - 15:35

Wow--I'm trying to recall, I believe I did see a study that showed many individuals in North America do test positive for peanut IgE, but not everyone reacts. I'll try to find that study. Doesn't this go back to what vinucube was saying about the lack of regulation? Thank you for tracking down this study, it's very interesting.

Posted on: Thu, 10/16/2014 - 12:04pm
vinucube's picture
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Joined: 10/12/2014 - 11:21

Very small amounts of allergen are enough to cause the development of allergy (sensitization). But having an allergic reaction (elicitation) may require exposure to a larger amount of the allergen.
So people with egg allergy, like my son who cannot eat egg at all, can safely get a flu shot that can contain up to 1 mcg of egg protein.

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