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Posted on: Sun, 10/12/2014 - 4:30am
Yael Kozar's picture
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Joined: 01/05/2011 - 16:27

it's not just vaccines but they do play a part. 2 girls a year apart one was on antibiotics (younger) during those 30 vaccines before the age of 3. Both mine are C-sec babies and breast fed. I had antibiotics then our food supply has antibiotics and then younger got bronchitis a few times (antibiotics weaken the gut and cause inflammation). Now what most people don't know is that vaccines have antibiotics, heavy metals and food proteins. This creates more inflammation plus genetic change. Guess how you sensitize a mouse to peanut~ aluminum +peanut =anaphylactic mouse! So check out the CDC ingredient list on the website for the gross list we inject and over inject into our bloodstream. Our daughter almost died in my arms at 18 months and 3 weeks to something she was around all the time without issue- right after her most amount of vaccines on a weak gut inflamed and lacking in healthy bacteria. Vaccines are the one thing that can cause genetic change-it's what they are suppose to do by nature. I am not anti-vaccine but we really need to clean them up and be more transparent and clean up our food supply and stop giving so many antibiotics in pharma. The US and W.H.O. vaccine schedule went up again and guess what also went up allergies with babies. For those that say they are not vaccinated and have allergies then it seems like you do have a hereditary predisposition or something else is going on-don't forget that hospitals do vaccinate and Vit K shot in 1st 24 hours after birth. Heather Fraser's Book "The Peanut Allergy Epidemic" is a must read before you say vaccines have nothing to do with this epidemic. Amish don't get our food supply, weak gut or vaccines and are reported to have none of the childhood epidemics that are plaguing our immunity--just saying.

Posted on: Sun, 10/12/2014 - 4:33am
vinucube's picture
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Joined: 10/12/2014 - 11:21

Vaccines are the most likely cause of food allergies.
Charles Richet discovered more than a hundred years ago that injecting proteins (such as those present in vaccines or injections) will cause the development of allergies to those proteins.
I have placed numerous peer-reviewed references here:
http://foodallergycauses.wordpress.com/
Many vaccines contain Polysorbate 80. Polysorbate 80 contains vegetable oils from undisclosed sources (could include peanut, tree nut, sesame oils etc.).
In 2003: Kuno-Sakai H, Kimura M. Removal of gelatin from live vaccines and DTaP-an ultimate solution for vaccine-related gelatin allergy.Biologicals 2003;31:245-9.
In 2013:
http://www.acaai.org/allergist/news/New/Pages/AllergictoGummyBearsBeCautiousGettingtheFluShot.aspx
If skin exposure is the cause http://www.peanutallergy.com/news/peanut-allergy-news/new-research-offers-insight-into-why-peanut-allergies-develop
it bolsters the evidence that the cause is injections/vaccines, intradermal allergy tests and it has nothing to do with when or if someone ate the allergens.

Posted on: Sun, 10/12/2014 - 10:17am
AmberC.'s picture
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Joined: 10/21/2013 - 15:35

The immune system is far more comprehensive than we ever imagined. The compartmentalization of the immune system has resulted in a much too simplistic view of immunity. We have forgotten what we once knew. Every cell, from the skin, to the bone marrow, is involved in our immune system. And thank goodness! This helps us build up immunity to harmful viruses, bacteria--but the same rules apply to food allergy. Keep food where it belongs: in the gut. Be careful food does not get into the bloodstream through skin prick testing or vaccines. Likewise, preserve your gut health. Also, be careful you don't build an immune system that's primed to overreact to everything (aluminum). Also, be careful with things like immunotherapy--for example, do poisonous grasses really belong in the eosophagus? This is a great thread. Thank you to everyone!

Posted on: Sun, 10/12/2014 - 10:41am
alc902's picture
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Joined: 10/12/2014 - 17:07

I have always been an advocate of vaccinations in children however, recent increases in allergies, asthma and autism make parents question the cause. My conclusion: it's the timing of the vaccinations. When you look at previous generations they did not get vaccinated until going to kindergarten. That gave their immune systems about 5 or 6 years to develop. The earlier generations did not have the health concerns we are now talking about. The difference is that now vaccinations begin on day one in the hospital and these little babies are having their immune systems disrupted immediately before they can become established. I have talked to health care professionals about this and the answers I receive do not put my mind at rest. Personally, it is my opinion that the children are getting vaccinated too early. Yes the diseases they try to prevent can be life threatening. However, the early vaccinations may now be creating a different level of life threatening conditions. I really think the research needs to focus more on timing rather than the ingredients or the almighty dollar.

Posted on: Sun, 10/12/2014 - 11:31am
AmberC.'s picture
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Joined: 10/21/2013 - 15:35

This is true, it's also hard to know the full story as currently vaccine manufacturers have no liability.

Posted on: Sun, 10/12/2014 - 3:53pm
Yael Kozar's picture
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Joined: 01/05/2011 - 16:27

If you ever open this petition back up or start a new one you could get a lot more milage today. Please feel free to blast on the Allergy Support group pages. "We have a right to know what is in our vaccines and injected into our bloodstream!" Transparency

Posted on: Mon, 10/13/2014 - 12:12am
abchouk2@gmail.com's picture
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Joined: 08/22/2013 - 02:23

Thank you for posting and discussing this topic. This is news to me that vaccinecs could cause food allergies. My son was allergic to peanut, Tree Nuts, Soy, Egg, Wheat, and Milk with symptoms showing shortly after birth, he is 14 now, and has outgrown all but the peanut and Tree nut allergies. I consider myself very well-informed about food allergies and do a lot of reading about them, but I had never heard of Peanut oil being in vaccines. We used to avoid the flu vaccine when allergic to eggs.
One poster mentioned tree nut oils being under the category of vegetable oil. This puzzles me, as the nuts would be considered a fruit or seed, not a vegetable. I know soybean oil is considered a vegetable oil, but in all of my years of reading and research have never heard of peanut oil or any tree nut oils being put in the category of "vegetable oil."
I would not completely rule out the possibility of some vaccine playing some role in sensitizing people to allergens, but I would think it is a very remote chance with a lot of unique factors converging to do this in a few individuals. My sons allergies do not seem to corallate in any way with his vaccines. And I do believe the benefits of vaccines far outweigh the risks. But this is certainly a very valid question, and I am upset to learn there would be peanut oil or other food ingredients in vaccines without full disclosure of ingredients to parents, etc. The issue of food allergies being related to vaccines in any way should definitely be the subject of further research, so that any vulnerable individuals could make informed decisions about vaccine schedule, type administered, etc.

Posted on: Mon, 10/13/2014 - 1:24am
AmberC.'s picture
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Joined: 10/21/2013 - 15:35

Hmmm, I would like to know how thoroughly ingredients in vax, or any injections, are investigated by the actual manufacturer. For example, if you are purchasing "hydryolyzed vegetable protein" for your cell culture, just for example, are you making sure it is 100% free from everyday foods? What vinucube is saying is that the role of vaccines is cumulative, with each vaccine acting like a booster shot--so it's very difficult to pinpoint the exact, magic moment antibodies to a particular food hit that threshold. Skin prick testing is also playing a role. If your child had any skin prick tests, they are also in there as a cause. Skin prick tests boost antibody levels to existing allergies and also create antibodies to foods that are not yet allergies. (Doctor, my child reacted to peanut, please also test for dairy, egg, tree nuts, shellfish. . .) And please, let's test every year or two, just make sure those antibody levels stay nice and healthy. :-) The body is designed to keep food out of the blood. (BTW, my understanding is that vegetables oils can contain tree nuts/peanuts--this is why we never buy potato chips that use "vegetable oil"--it's far too vague of a label.)

Posted on: Mon, 10/13/2014 - 1:28am
AmberC.'s picture
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Joined: 10/21/2013 - 15:35

If your nephew had any skin prick tests along the way, which are often done every 2 years or so, and often to a range of foods, it could be that puberty just happened to correlate with the antibodies from his skin prick testing hitting adequate numbers of antibodies to react. Likewise, skin prick testing releases great amounts of histamine, and foods naturally vary in amounts of histamine, if your body is flooded with histamine, you are going to suddenly react to all types of foods you could eat previously.

Posted on: Mon, 10/13/2014 - 3:29am
abchouk2@gmail.com's picture
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Joined: 08/22/2013 - 02:23

My son never had any skin tests except egg when he was outgrowing it. He had allergy symptoms as an infant, and anaphylaxis when he was 10 months. He had blood tests. He also had subsequent reactions to all the foods he tested positive to, before Dx and accidental exposures after that. the allergist and I were aware of the risks of skin tests further sensitizing or causing a reaction, so we avoided them. Although my son never had some of the foods directly, like peanut, tree nuts, and egg, I was eating all of these allergens and nursing him, and he had many symptoms, which the pediatricians just accepted as an immature digestive system, or due to other causes. I suspected peanut allergy a month before his anaphylactic reaction to milk at 10 months, and had cut nuts from my diet, and saw slight improvement in his symptoms, but once I eliminated all of his food allergens from my own diet after that reaction and the RAST test results, we saw a very dramatic difference in his health, all of the symptoms disappeared except his excema, which decreased 80%, and his occasional asthma symptoms. I continued to breastfeed my son until the age of 20 months, Doctors' orders, without ingesting any of his allergens, as a substitute for milk that was free of milk, nuts, soy, wheat, etc., was not available. At 20 months we had enough in his diet with rice milk and calcium fortification, etc., to make the switch.
I have never heard of vegetable oil indicating nut or peanut oil, even in food allergy circles and from experts in the field. If that were the case, it should be common knowledge to the food allergy community. If that were the case, It would have to be spelled-out in plain English on foods manufactured in the United States in the ingredients or directly after, as they are in the top 8 allergens required to be labeled that way. I know there are situations out of that net, but have always asked what the vegetable oil is at fairs, etc., and it has never been peanut or tree nut oil. Canola or soybean oil always.

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