\"Full Time School Nurses\"

Posted on: Wed, 04/16/2003 - 1:31am
MommaBear's picture
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[url="http://www.doe.mass.edu/cnp/2002/news/allergy.pdf"]http://www.doe.mass.edu/cnp/2002/news/allergy.pdf[/url]

Link to document [b] "Managing Life-Threatening Allergies in Schools". [/b] On page three is found the quote:

[b]"Every school building with a student at risk for anaphylaxis should have a full time school nurse."[/b]

How do you feel about this statement?

[i]Why?[/i]

Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy or content of the link in this post.

This in compliment to another thread:

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/000966.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/000966.html[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 04/16/2003 - 4:40am
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I went to this article and read some of it. I am interested to get back to it later and read more. As far as a full time nurse in the school, we have one at our school, and I guess I never really thought about not having one. I guess it would make me uncomfortable if there was not one there. In fact, I am going over an emergency plan with our school and will be asking about when the nurse is out of the office, is the office staff aware and able to use the epi-pen? Its bringing up a lot to think about. Thanks for the link.
Maggie

Posted on: Wed, 04/16/2003 - 5:18am
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Joined: 02/22/1999 - 09:00

This may be naive, but my thoughts on this are as follows...
My child is at considerable risk for anaphylactic reactions as he has already had one big one(full body hives, loss of consciousness, dropping blood oxygen levels) and another of just hives and swelling. He is anaphylactically allergic (whatever that means) to both pa and bees. If the school nurse has life saving equipment at her disposal, I would [b]absolutely[/b] want her (or him) there at [b]all[/b] times. But I don't think schools have the funding to provide such equipment. Therefore, I think her expertise would be beneficial (but not exclusive to the nurse) in recognizing a reaction and having the presence of mind to treat it appropriately. And, of course, to train school staff.
Now, I do not profess to know more than any other Joe Shmoe out there, but I do know a lot about my child and his allergies. I've run across school nurses who feel there is nothing wrong with keeping Epi's locked up. On this particular topic, I will say that [b]I[/b] know better than those nurses that keeping an Epi locked up is not okay. If my son were to go to either of those schools, I feel that his life would be in danger, despite (or because of) there being a full time nurse. Of course, I could take the issue up with the Superintendant, create a 504, etc. and work to get the Epi in the classroom, but I don't have to do that at my son's nurse-free school.

Posted on: Wed, 04/16/2003 - 11:59pm
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

[url="http://www.nasn.org/positions/allergy.htm"]http://www.nasn.org/positions/allergy.htm[/url]
Link to Position Statement from the National Association of School Nurses.
Entitled:
"The Role of School Nurses in Allergy/Anaphylaxis Management"
Quote from end of Position Statement:
[b]"It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that schools have a basic duty to care for students, utilizing appropriate resources and personnel. School nurses are uniquely prepared to develop and implement individualized health care plans within state nurse practice act parameters and to coordinate the team approach required to manage students with the potential for experiencing allergic reactions."[/b]
[url="http://www.nasn.org/positions/Epinephrine.htm"]http://www.nasn.org/positions/Epinephrine.htm[/url]
Link to Position Statement from the National Association of School Nurses.
Entitled:
"Epinephrine Use in Life-Threatening Emergencies"
Quote from near end of Position Statement:
[b]"An individual health care plan that includes continuous monitoring, emergency plans, and evaluation should be written by the school nurse and maintained for every student with prescribed epinephrine. The school nurse should provide training for school staff in the recognition of life-threatening allergic reactions and, if appropriate, in the administration of pre-filled, single dose epinephrine prescribed for these students."[/b]
Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy or content of the link in this post.

Posted on: Thu, 04/17/2003 - 12:07am
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

[url="http://www.aaaai.org/media/resources/position_statements/ps26.stm"]http://www.aaaai.org/media/resources/position_statements/ps26.stm[/url]
Link to "Position Statement 26
The Use of Epinephrine in the Treatment of Anaphylaxis" by AAAA&I (American Academy of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology.)
Quote from Position Statement:
[b]"It would be optimal for epinephrine to be available in all schools for use by nurses or trained individuals to administer to students or staff presumed to be having ananaphylactic reaction. School nurses and other supervisory personnel should receive periodic in-service training concerning anaphylaxis, the proper use of epinephrine, the importance of emergency procedures and physician notification after the injection, and proper record keeping."[/b]
this is definitely worth the read. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy or content of the link in this post.

Posted on: Thu, 04/24/2003 - 3:45am
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Chris?
MommaBear [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sat, 05/03/2003 - 4:47pm
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

reraising.

Posted on: Thu, 05/08/2003 - 11:33pm
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

reraising.

Posted on: Fri, 05/09/2003 - 3:06am
tgab's picture
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Joined: 06/24/2000 - 09:00

In reply to:
"I've run across school nurses who feel there is nothing wrong with keeping Epi's locked up. On this particular topic, I will say that I know better than those nurses that keeping an Epi locked up is not okay."
Our school nurse actually tried to tell me it's SAFER to have the epi locked up in her office because then everyone will not be confused as to where it is in the event of an emergency. HELLO!?!?! That is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard. If the teacher can't remember that there is an epi kit in her classroom then we have serious problems. I didn't tell her in as many words as I wanted to, because I have the support of my doctor, and possibly the principal, to keep the epi in alternate places in the school. So I think everything should be ok. I have no reason to cause unnecessary hate and discontent.

Posted on: Fri, 05/09/2003 - 3:57am
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Quote:Originally posted by tgab:
[b]In reply to:
"I've run across school nurses who feel there is nothing wrong with keeping Epi's locked up. On this particular topic, I will say that I know better than those nurses that keeping an Epi locked up is not okay."
Our school nurse actually tried to tell me it's SAFER to have the epi locked up in her office because then everyone will not be confused as to where it is in the event of an emergency. HELLO!?!?! That is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard. If the teacher can't remember that there is an epi kit in her classroom then we have serious problems. I didn't tell her in as many words as I wanted to, because I have the support of my doctor, and possibly the principal, to keep the epi in alternate places in the school. So I think everything should be ok. I have no reason to cause unnecessary hate and discontent.
[/b]
"I posted in another thread:
As I realized we could never eliminate all risk at school, *in our personal situation*, and contemplated the consequences of such a risk, *in our personal situation*, I also realized that it was necessary ,*in our personal situation*, for my son to be in close proximity to his life saving medication. For us (my husband and I) to willingly place him in a situation where this was not possible (being in close proximity to his life saving medication) would be negligent on our (my husband and I) part. Quite possibly malpractice. Knowing what we (my husband and I) know.
The 504 meetings did not yield this result. (Our son being in "close proximity" to life-saving medication). Knowing what we (my husband and I) know, and post cold realization that the school,*in our personal situation*, and it's agents,*in our personal situation*, surely must fit one of the following options:
1. Did not hold the same opinion.
2. Did hold the same opinion and were unwilling to accomodate.(Perhaps this is why they strongly suggested we "homeschool" ie, Principal stated to us:"You should homeschool your child.")
3. Did hold the same opinion and were unable to accomodate. (Perhaps this is why they strongly suggested we "homeschool" ie, Principal stated to us:"You should homeschool your child.")
Irregardless of the situation that existed, my son was being placed directly in the way of unnecessary risk,*in our personal situation*. That is what we (my family) found most unacceptable.
MommaBear, Mother to two awe-inspiring little boys, age 7 3/4 PA(contact, air-borne, ingestion)/Nuts/some other legumes/Asthma/EA/"Atopic" child in general,
age 3 5/8 (So far not PA , but had an accidental "oral challenge" without my permission, lol./not officially diagnosed with "Asthma" yet/no food allergies that we are aware of.
Link of Interest:
(to a document entitled: "Managing Life-Threatening Food Allergies in Schools")
[url="http://www.doe.mass.edu/cnp/2002/news/allergy.pdf"]http://www.doe.mass.edu/cnp/2002/news/allergy.pdf[/url]
note on page 3: "*Schools should be prepared to manage an anaphylactic emergency by:......
(d) maintaining a current supply of epinephrine by auto-injector in at least two easily accessible loctions and/or carried by the student when appropriate. (Please note: epinephrine should never be kept in a locked cabinet.)"
Also of interest is "Appendix C" on pages 42-43 of the same document."
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003704.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003704.html[/url]
Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form, merely relating my family's *unique and personal* situation. I do not guarantee the accuracy or content of the link in this post.

Posted on: Fri, 05/09/2003 - 3:05pm
tgab's picture
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Joined: 06/24/2000 - 09:00

MommaBear, thanks for copying the link, and your message. If only we lived in Massachusetts!

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