\"Full Time School Nurses\"

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[url="http://www.doe.mass.edu/cnp/2002/news/allergy.pdf"]http://www.doe.mass.edu/cnp/2002/news/allergy.pdf[/url]

Link to document [b] "Managing Life-Threatening Allergies in Schools". [/b] On page three is found the quote:

[b]"Every school building with a student at risk for anaphylaxis should have a full time school nurse."[/b]

How do you feel about this statement?

[i]Why?[/i]

Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy or content of the link in this post.

This in compliment to another thread:

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/000966.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/000966.html[/url]

On Apr 16, 2003

I went to this article and read some of it. I am interested to get back to it later and read more. As far as a full time nurse in the school, we have one at our school, and I guess I never really thought about not having one. I guess it would make me uncomfortable if there was not one there. In fact, I am going over an emergency plan with our school and will be asking about when the nurse is out of the office, is the office staff aware and able to use the epi-pen? Its bringing up a lot to think about. Thanks for the link.

Maggie

On Apr 16, 2003

This may be naive, but my thoughts on this are as follows... My child is at considerable risk for anaphylactic reactions as he has already had one big one(full body hives, loss of consciousness, dropping blood oxygen levels) and another of just hives and swelling. He is anaphylactically allergic (whatever that means) to both pa and bees. If the school nurse has life saving equipment at her disposal, I would [b]absolutely[/b] want her (or him) there at [b]all[/b] times. But I don't think schools have the funding to provide such equipment. Therefore, I think her expertise would be beneficial (but not exclusive to the nurse) in recognizing a reaction and having the presence of mind to treat it appropriately. And, of course, to train school staff.

Now, I do not profess to know more than any other Joe Shmoe out there, but I do know a lot about my child and his allergies. I've run across school nurses who feel there is nothing wrong with keeping Epi's locked up. On this particular topic, I will say that [b]I[/b] know better than those nurses that keeping an Epi locked up is not okay. If my son were to go to either of those schools, I feel that his life would be in danger, despite (or because of) there being a full time nurse. Of course, I could take the issue up with the Superintendant, create a 504, etc. and work to get the Epi in the classroom, but I don't have to do that at my son's nurse-free school.

On Apr 17, 2003

[url="http://www.nasn.org/positions/allergy.htm"]http://www.nasn.org/positions/allergy.htm[/url]

Link to Position Statement from the National Association of School Nurses.

Entitled:

"The Role of School Nurses in Allergy/Anaphylaxis Management"

Quote from end of Position Statement:

[b]"It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that schools have a basic duty to care for students, utilizing appropriate resources and personnel. School nurses are uniquely prepared to develop and implement individualized health care plans within state nurse practice act parameters and to coordinate the team approach required to manage students with the potential for experiencing allergic reactions."[/b]

[url="http://www.nasn.org/positions/Epinephrine.htm"]http://www.nasn.org/positions/Epinephrine.htm[/url]

Link to Position Statement from the National Association of School Nurses.

Entitled:

"Epinephrine Use in Life-Threatening Emergencies"

Quote from near end of Position Statement:

[b]"An individual health care plan that includes continuous monitoring, emergency plans, and evaluation should be written by the school nurse and maintained for every student with prescribed epinephrine. The school nurse should provide training for school staff in the recognition of life-threatening allergic reactions and, if appropriate, in the administration of pre-filled, single dose epinephrine prescribed for these students."[/b]

Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy or content of the link in this post.

On Apr 17, 2003

[url="http://www.aaaai.org/media/resources/position_statements/ps26.stm"]http://www.aaaai.org/media/resources/position_statements/ps26.stm[/url]

Link to "Position Statement 26 The Use of Epinephrine in the Treatment of Anaphylaxis" by AAAA&I (American Academy of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology.)

Quote from Position Statement:

[b]"It would be optimal for epinephrine to be available in all schools for use by nurses or trained individuals to administer to students or staff presumed to be having ananaphylactic reaction. School nurses and other supervisory personnel should receive periodic in-service training concerning anaphylaxis, the proper use of epinephrine, the importance of emergency procedures and physician notification after the injection, and proper record keeping."[/b]

this is definitely worth the read. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy or content of the link in this post.

On Apr 24, 2003

Chris?

MommaBear [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

On May 3, 2003

reraising.

On May 9, 2003

reraising.

On May 9, 2003

In reply to:

"I've run across school nurses who feel there is nothing wrong with keeping Epi's locked up. On this particular topic, I will say that I know better than those nurses that keeping an Epi locked up is not okay."

Our school nurse actually tried to tell me it's SAFER to have the epi locked up in her office because then everyone will not be confused as to where it is in the event of an emergency. HELLO!?!?! That is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard. If the teacher can't remember that there is an epi kit in her classroom then we have serious problems. I didn't tell her in as many words as I wanted to, because I have the support of my doctor, and possibly the principal, to keep the epi in alternate places in the school. So I think everything should be ok. I have no reason to cause unnecessary hate and discontent.

On May 9, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by tgab: [b]In reply to:

"I've run across school nurses who feel there is nothing wrong with keeping Epi's locked up. On this particular topic, I will say that I know better than those nurses that keeping an Epi locked up is not okay."

Our school nurse actually tried to tell me it's SAFER to have the epi locked up in her office because then everyone will not be confused as to where it is in the event of an emergency. HELLO!?!?! That is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard. If the teacher can't remember that there is an epi kit in her classroom then we have serious problems. I didn't tell her in as many words as I wanted to, because I have the support of my doctor, and possibly the principal, to keep the epi in alternate places in the school. So I think everything should be ok. I have no reason to cause unnecessary hate and discontent.

[/b]

"I posted in another thread:

As I realized we could never eliminate all risk at school, *in our personal situation*, and contemplated the consequences of such a risk, *in our personal situation*, I also realized that it was necessary ,*in our personal situation*, for my son to be in close proximity to his life saving medication. For us (my husband and I) to willingly place him in a situation where this was not possible (being in close proximity to his life saving medication) would be negligent on our (my husband and I) part. Quite possibly malpractice. Knowing what we (my husband and I) know.

The 504 meetings did not yield this result. (Our son being in "close proximity" to life-saving medication). Knowing what we (my husband and I) know, and post cold realization that the school,*in our personal situation*, and it's agents,*in our personal situation*, surely must fit one of the following options:

1. Did not hold the same opinion.

2. Did hold the same opinion and were unwilling to accomodate.(Perhaps this is why they strongly suggested we "homeschool" ie, Principal stated to us:"You should homeschool your child.")

3. Did hold the same opinion and were unable to accomodate. (Perhaps this is why they strongly suggested we "homeschool" ie, Principal stated to us:"You should homeschool your child.")

Irregardless of the situation that existed, my son was being placed directly in the way of unnecessary risk,*in our personal situation*. That is what we (my family) found most unacceptable.

MommaBear, Mother to two awe-inspiring little boys, age 7 3/4 PA(contact, air-borne, ingestion)/Nuts/some other legumes/Asthma/EA/"Atopic" child in general, age 3 5/8 (So far not PA , but had an accidental "oral challenge" without my permission, lol./not officially diagnosed with "Asthma" yet/no food allergies that we are aware of.

Link of Interest: (to a document entitled: "Managing Life-Threatening Food Allergies in Schools")

[url="http://www.doe.mass.edu/cnp/2002/news/allergy.pdf"]http://www.doe.mass.edu/cnp/2002/news/allergy.pdf[/url]

note on page 3: "*Schools should be prepared to manage an anaphylactic emergency by:......

(d) maintaining a current supply of epinephrine by auto-injector in at least two easily accessible loctions and/or carried by the student when appropriate. (Please note: epinephrine should never be kept in a locked cabinet.)"

Also of interest is "Appendix C" on pages 42-43 of the same document."

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003704.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003704.html[/url]

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form, merely relating my family's *unique and personal* situation. I do not guarantee the accuracy or content of the link in this post.

On May 9, 2003

MommaBear, thanks for copying the link, and your message. If only we lived in Massachusetts!

On May 9, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by tgab: [b] If only we lived in Massachusetts!

[/b]

[b]?[/b]

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form.

On May 10, 2003

Because Mass. is the state that the document you just sent the link to is from.

On May 11, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by tgab: [b]Because Mass. is the state that the document you just sent the link to is from.[/b]

Are all the ideas contained therein specific to Mass? Should they be?

MommaBear [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Merely asking questions.

On May 11, 2003

Trust me, Massachusetts has yet to embrace this document and follow all of its guidelines, especially with all the cuts just made by our new Governor. We just passed a 3 million dollar tax override in our town, so as not to lose 60 full time staff postions in our schools! We are losing 16 positions regardless. I wonder if anyone has even read it yet?!

The daily alternate offering for lunch in my town is PB sandwich.

It is a great document, but actually was published after the start of this school year. It also is only recommendations, not required, not law. It does have its limitations, basically.

Of course, with a little help from vocal community members(like me!), perhaps the schools will all come to embrace and follow the guidelines. becca

On May 11, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by becca: [b]

It is a great document, but actually was published after the start of this school year. It also is only recommendations, not required, not law. It does have its limitations, basically.

[/b]

Do you feel the document is "authoritative" in any way? If it is, to whom? If it is and to whom, (depending on those answers) would you consider it "binding"?

Side note: I reference a "Nursing Drug Reference" often. And most likely in a formal setting.

I wonder if anyone from the "Task Force" listed in the document would be willing to be a "Chat" guest?

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form.

On May 11, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by becca: [b]

The daily alternate offering for lunch in my town is PB sandwich.

[/b]

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003529.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003529.html[/url]

In re: "posted May 11, 2003 10:03 AM"

Your take on this?

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form.

On May 11, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by becca: [b]The daily alternate offering for lunch in my town is PB sandwich. [/b]

Wow... I am glad I didn't grow up in that town. Must be difficult for you. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

In my childhood, Here the daily lunch preference was McDonalds or cheese sandwiches. Some kids did bring pb sandwiches but it was a minority.

On May 11, 2003

You are fast, MB! I have the document and I need to really pick through it, highlight and talk to my superintendant to make fully-informed comments. We are 2 years away from Kindergarten, and I am not saying I am disatisfied with the way our schools handle PA(except offering the daily PB lunch).

There are peanut free tables, and even peanut only tables at one school. I have heard of other policies at one school where the class with the PA child has assigned seats for lunch and a peanut free classroom. I am just delving into it and getting info from parents to then compile my questions and issues with the super prior to enrolling my dd in the system.

I do not think a document has legally binding authority, but certainly, by its existence, it would imply some negligence if a school is not using the guidelines. However, I can see after some accident it being called into question that they were recommendations, not laws.

BTW, weren't you going to travel in your rec. vehicle for Mother's Day? I gotta go for the day, Happy Mother's Day! Becca

On May 14, 2003

Hi everyone, I'm new here and just thought I'd offer a little bit of information on the Mass. Guidelines.

I've recently been very involved in advocating for full time nurses in our schools. We are lacking a few hours of each day at two of our elementary schools. I've done extensive research and have had numerous lengthy discussions with administrators and school committee members. I'm happy to say that in September, Belmont will have full time nurses in all of its schools. During this process I made many contacts at the Ma. Dept of public health and the Ma. Dept. of education. Although the document is a 'guideline' it most likely would hold up in court legally. There are many organizations, medical and educational that support this document, and it is felt that it would hold water.

It is very lengthy and detailed. It does, however give a good starting point for creating a policy. We are in the process of doing that now.

I was one of the parents that spoke at the Ma. State House a few weeks ago for School Health Advocacy Day. There are senators and state reps that support funding school health departments. I encourage everyone to contact your reps and legislators and let them know that funding the school health departments is crucial.

On May 14, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by T.Normile: [b]Hi everyone, I'm new here and just thought I'd offer a little bit of information on the Mass. Guidelines.

I've recently been very involved in advocating for full time nurses in our schools. We are lacking a few hours of each day at two of our elementary schools. I've done extensive research and have had numerous lengthy discussions with administrators and school committee members. I'm happy to say that in September, Belmont will have full time nurses in all of its schools. During this process I made many contacts at the Ma. Dept of public health and the Ma. Dept. of education. Although the document is a 'guideline' it most likely would hold up in court legally. There are many organizations, medical and educational that support this document, and it is felt that it would hold water.

It is very lengthy and detailed. It does, however give a good starting point for creating a policy. We are in the process of doing that now.

I was one of the parents that spoke at the Ma. State House a few weeks ago for School Health Advocacy Day. There are senators and state reps that support funding school health departments. I encourage everyone to contact your reps and legislators and let them know that funding the school health departments is crucial.[/b]

HAAAAAAAAAAAAALEL-LU-JAH! HAAAAAAAAAAALEL-LU-JAH! HA-LEL-LU-JAH! HA-LEL-LU-JAH! HA-LEEEEEEE-EEEEEEEL-LUUUUUUUUUUU-JAH!

[url="http://members.aol.com/nonstopny/easter/messiah.htm#hear%20it%20live"]http://members.aol.com/nonstopny/easter/messiah.htm#hear%20it%20live[/url]

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Merely humming to myself. Loudly."

On May 16, 2003

Becca, I'm curious as to what town you're in. If you'd like any ideas about how we went about getting something in writing, let me know.

On May 16, 2003

T.Normile, you can email me at [email]imissmandms@hotmail.com[/email]. I have tried to update my email in my profile but cannot seem to do it. I would be interested in what you did to prepare for enrolling in school. As I said, my dd is unlikely to start K until Sept., 2005, so I have not done more than alot of scoping through other parents at present.

I do know there are some PA kids in the system, and more ahead of us in the next year or two. I have found at our preschool, I am the most vocal, and restrictive with diet, with regards to the peanut allergy. It seems alot of folks are pretty relaxed about risky foods like candies and fresh bakery products, etc... I am wondering what I might be up against as I head for elementary school.

I know I want to do away with offering PB as a daily alternate for lunch! Gosh, that is easy enough to send in from home, I think they could come up with another option, like a turkey or ham sandwich. becca

On May 26, 2003

[url="http://www.healthinschools.org/nov_alerts.asp#5"]http://www.healthinschools.org/nov_alerts.asp#5[/url]

Link to "The Center for Health and Health Care in Schools"

scroll down to:

"November 5, 2001 - The Role of the School Nurse in Providing School Health Services"

Interesting Link.

Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy or content of the link in this post.

On Sep 5, 2003

reraising for JohnTyler's mom, and to compliment a thread running.

On Sep 21, 2003

reraising. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

On Oct 29, 2003

reraising.

On Nov 5, 2003

reraising for gizmo.

On Nov 6, 2003

Mommabear,

Take a peek at the article I posted in the Media forum. I think you'll be pleased!

On Nov 7, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by momma2boys: [b]Mommabear,

Take a peek at the article I posted in the Media forum. I think you'll be pleased![/b]

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000625.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000625.html[/url]

(worked from 3p to 7a last night/this morning. This was sure woke my eyes up this morning.) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

On Sep 4, 2004

reraising.

On Aug 25, 2005

reraising. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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