Fried Chicken?

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 1:59am
Grandpa Chuck's picture
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Joined: 06/22/2006 - 09:00

First Post... THANK YOU!!! This is such a wonderful group, your information and experiences are priceless!
My Grandson, Matt 18 months, (my first grandchild, absolutely beautiful boy) was diagnosed with severe peanut allergy about six months ago. His parents are very conscientious about it. They ask at restaurants, scrutinize all labels, keep Epi pens nearby, etc, etc.

Last night we were tending Matt and took him to a community picnic. They were serving fried chicken. My son told me this was a NO because they may have fried the food in peanut oil. But my wife and I had some of the chicken. During the meal, I noticed that he wiped his face with a napkin that my wife had used to wipe her hands after eating the chicken!
Does that sound like a hazard?
He was OK.
We are trying to do our best and appreciate your help.

Thanks again,
Grandpa Chuck

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 2:09am
Daisy's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

Welcome,
How great to have a concerned grandparent here! How wonderful you and your wife are to be looking out for your grandson!
So many family members just don't "get it," and don't seem to care to... Y'all are an important part of your grandson's life, even more so because you care so much.
And yes, cross-contamination is a "biggy". If you can't read the label, it should be considered a hazard. And kissing/hugging after eating suspect foods can be a hazard for some kids, especially those that are contact reactive. Most family members prefer to refrain from eating peanut products when they are going to be around allergic children. Some even rid their homes of the offending allergen, so the child has a "safe zone" where they can feel comfortable with no mishaps.
Again, welcome and thanks for caring,
Daisy
Adult - MFA
DD, age 9 - NKA
edited to add:
Glad he was ok! Whew>> crisis avoided! Did you have his Epi/liquid Benadryl with you?
[This message has been edited by Daisy (edited June 22, 2006).]

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 4:25am
Grandpa Chuck's picture
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Joined: 06/22/2006 - 09:00

Thanks Daisy!
So, how long after eating peanut products is it safe to be around a person with fairly severe PA? For instance could a family member eat a PB&J sandwich, wash his face and hands, brush & rinse and then be OK to hold the child?

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 4:49am
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

I read that peanut protein is detectable in a person's saliva up to 4 hrs after eating peanut butter *whether or not they brush their teeth*. To me, this means that while your body is digesting the peanuts, the allergenic protein is in your system and is secreted in your saliva (and maybe other bodily fluids like sweat).
Here is the link to the article:
[url="http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/525036"]http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/525036[/url]
I hope this helps!
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.
[This message has been edited by Momcat (edited June 22, 2006).]

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 4:50am
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

Here's the article in case you can't access MedScape.
Peanut Allergen Exposure Via Kissing a Real Possibility, Researcher Warns
By Megan Rauscher
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) Mar 07 - Peanut-allergic patients, particularly adolescents, need to be counseled on the risks of kissing someone who has recently eaten peanuts or peanut-containing products, even if that person brushed their teeth afterwards, a researcher said at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's annual meeting in Miami Beach.
Despite the recent conclusion from the Quebec coroner's office that a 15-year-old girl with a severe peanut allergy did not die from kissing her boyfriend after he ate a peanut butter sandwich, as was theorized, "there is a risk for allergens to be transferred in saliva," Dr. Jennifer M. Maloney of Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York noted at a press conference.
"Several investigators," she continued, "have looked at populations of food-allergic individuals and have found that significant proportions of them do have reactions via kissing."
Dr. Maloney and colleagues evaluated the level of peanut protein in saliva, and methods to remove it, in 10 volunteers after they ate a sandwich containing 2 tablespoons of peanut butter.
Saliva concentrations of the major peanut allergen, Ara h 1, varied markedly immediately after ingestion. The levels ranged from less than 15 ng/mL, which is below the detection limit for the ELISA, in three subjects, up to 16,131 ng/mL.
By one hour after the meal, levels became undetectable in the saliva from six of the seven individuals who had positive post-meal tests. Ara h 1 levels became undetectable in all subjects within 4.5 hours without any intervention.
According to Dr. Maloney, none of the immediate interventions -- brushing the teeth, brushing and rinsing, rinsing alone, or chewing gum -- consistently reduced Ara h 1 levels to below the level of detection. "Everything reduced the amount but nothing uniformly removed it," Dr. Maloney said.
"It is not enough," she pointed out, "for clinicians just to tell peanut-allergic individuals to simply have their partner brush their teeth or rinse their mouth and think that this is a safe approach, because we found that it certainly did not remove peanut allergen to an undetectable level."
"The safest approach," Dr. Maloney advised, "would be for the partner of a food-allergic individual to completely avoid the food. If this is impossible, we think that waiting several hours, possibly eating a meal in between, would reduce the levels below a level that would pose a critical problem." A larger study currently underway may provide more definitive answers.

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 6:15am
princesshinmighty's picture
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Joined: 04/27/2002 - 09:00

I think it lasts longer than four hours...Here's my thoughts and experiences behind it.
When I was first diagnosed as allergic to pistachios, I hadn't had them for 3 days when my skin STILL broke out in rashes/kept kicking up. I talked to my allergist about it and she stated that because nuts are a protein, they can and will stay in your system for longer than regular allergens.
I've reacted from my significant other's "sweat/tears/other stuff" days after his having had peanut-oil-fried food.
So to answer the question about the eating a pb sammich and then washing up and holding the baby, I'd advise against it, depending on how he reacts. I usually request a buffer of atleast 24-48 hours before I will be around my nephews, especially since one is 2 years old and is known for his slobbery kisses...(Really I've tried to get my sister to NOT give them pb before they were three -- but her old babysitter ignored her requests and gave them whatever she was giving her children -- which included lots of pb-inclusive snacks.)
Welcome to the board and I hope I didn't scare you! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 6:18am
Grandpa Chuck's picture
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Joined: 06/22/2006 - 09:00

Thanks for the great article, Momcat!
Wow! If there is such a risk from that kind of secondary exposure, there are a whole lot of dangers out there.
I just hope that as Grandparents we can do what we need to to make sure this little guy is safe
when he comes to visit or we take him out.
I really appreciate the article. Thank You!
Grandpa Chuck

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 12:33pm
pamsmom's picture
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Joined: 06/22/2006 - 09:00

I am a Mother of a almost 6 year old beautiful little girl. She is severely allergic to all nuts(and horses). I can't tell you how ecstatic I am to have found this site and have NO excuse for not looking before. I am teary eyed cause I was feeling a little alone. So glad your all here!! I geuss I am becoming more active since my daughter will be entering FULL day 1st grade and am scared to death!!! 1/2 day kindergarten was bad enough, now she'll be eating there too. I had to pick her up from her 2 1/2 hour day 6+ times!!! I could go on forever about all my thoughts on this subject...suffice it to say I will be a huge advocate in the public schools to make my little one safe. I don't care if they think I am a pain in the butt. Things must change here in Spokane!!!!!

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 12:40pm
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

pamsmom,
Are you in Spokane, WA? I am surprised to hear you say that things are not going well there. According to their website, Spokane Public Schools has a really comprehensive food allergy policy which was put in place after the death of 3rd grader Nathan Walters! Look at [url="http://www.spokaneschools.org/NutritionServices/Allergies/"]http://www.spokaneschools.org/NutritionServices/Allergies/[/url]
Did you receive any of that information that they list on the website when you enrolled for K?
Just curious!
And welcome to the group! There is a lot of information here in the Schools forum. Just use the search function to find older posts.
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.
[This message has been edited by Momcat (edited June 22, 2006).]

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 2:09am
Daisy's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

Welcome,
How great to have a concerned grandparent here! How wonderful you and your wife are to be looking out for your grandson!
So many family members just don't "get it," and don't seem to care to... Y'all are an important part of your grandson's life, even more so because you care so much.
And yes, cross-contamination is a "biggy". If you can't read the label, it should be considered a hazard. And kissing/hugging after eating suspect foods can be a hazard for some kids, especially those that are contact reactive. Most family members prefer to refrain from eating peanut products when they are going to be around allergic children. Some even rid their homes of the offending allergen, so the child has a "safe zone" where they can feel comfortable with no mishaps.
Again, welcome and thanks for caring,
Daisy
Adult - MFA
DD, age 9 - NKA
edited to add:
Glad he was ok! Whew>> crisis avoided! Did you have his Epi/liquid Benadryl with you?
[This message has been edited by Daisy (edited June 22, 2006).]

Posted on: Thu, 06/22/2006 - 4:25am
Grandpa Chuck's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/22/2006 - 09:00

Thanks Daisy!
So, how long after eating peanut products is it safe to be around a person with fairly severe PA? For instance could a family member eat a PB&J sandwich, wash his face and hands, brush & rinse and then be OK to hold the child?

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