For those dealing with milk allergy

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I recently found out DS#2 (15 months old) is allergic to milk. He's a picky eater and I'm trying to expand his diet. Currently, he mostly eats soy milk, hot dogs, ground beef, bananas, pears, avocados, sweet potatoes, white potatoes, pasta, cereal, crackers, and some other homemade bread products. He doesn't seem to care for apples and plums (possible OAS?) Does anyone have any suggestions what to feed him? (By the way, we're dealing with peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, sesame, and most legumes with DS#1 so we would need to avoid these items as well.)

On Sep 28, 2006

Hi! My DS who is milk and egg allergic likes....(and avoiding peanuts and treenuts):

refried beans wrapped in a flour tortilla hot dogs some lunch meats corn dogs meatloaf taco meat soynut butter and jelly sandwiches amy's brand enchiladas chili mac (canned, by franco american I think?) kielbasa sausages pancakes (ours are milk and egg free, too!) grilled soy cheese sandwiches made with flieschmans light butter

tyson chicken nuggets (not all varieties) some varieities of fish sticks plain fish , broiled with lemon pastas breakfast sausages hash browns

this is off the top of my head. I'll post more later if I can think of more!!!! My DS is 2 years old...so some of these foods your little one may not care for yet...

Good luck to you..

On Sep 29, 2006

To keep adding to the list:

Teddy Grahams Rold Gold Pretzels Pringles Potato Chips Meatloaf (milk and egg free) Meatballs (milk and egg free) (We use a cup of applesauce to hold the meat together.) Popcorn Oreos

I realize that I'm just adding the junk food.

On Sep 29, 2006

be careful with the hotdogs. if it says sodium lactate... thats dairy. use kosher hot dogs. kosher anything wont mix dairy with the meat. so we eat kosher fish sticks to. a hint i got from my allergy dr was that if it has skim milk in it its realy bad because of the protine (sp) count in it ... but something with whole milk or butter milk will bother them less because it has less protine.. butter dosnt bother my son but fish stick where the last ingredent is skim milk recks him for a week. just something to look out for! oh also chef boyardee makes shells and meat balls that has no dairy in it. but the other canned stuff has dairy in it!

just my 2 cents

On Sep 29, 2006

I called FAAN over this very issue about sodium lactate a couple of years ago. It seemed like more and more brands of hotdogs say either sodium lactate or potassium lactate. FAAN said that it is not milk. Now that we have FALCPA it turned out FAAN was correct. If sodium lactate in hot dogs were milk, the law would require the hot dog company to put the word "milk" on the label. So sodium lactate in hot dogs is usually not milk.

On Sep 29, 2006

sodium lactate isnt milk? i always thought it was. i stand corrected, ive been avoiding it because i thought that was what was causing the intestional problems i assocate with dairy in my son. wonder what is giving him the squirts with hotdogs.

god i hope its not another allergy. uuuggghhhh

On Sep 29, 2006

i started my kids on smoothies about they age. they loved them and could add all kinds of things like carrots to them. can use soy yogurt and tofu if you want to add protein. if they arent sweat enough just add a little bit of concentrated fruit juice rather than sugar. we do banana, soy yogurt, rice milk, and strawberries alot.

------------------ Lalow James 4 yrs, NKA Ben 3 yrs, PA and MA and SA

On Sep 29, 2006

I think sodium lactate can be milk, but isn`t always milk. So many of the juices have calcium lactate and it isn`t milk either. Now that we have FALCPA, you will know if it is milk because it must actually have the word "milk" somewhere on the ingredient list if the lactate means milk.

On Sep 29, 2006

Thanks for clearing up the sodium lactate thing Carefulmom. I thought it would have to say "milk" but have always been worried about giving them to dd.

On Sep 29, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by Carefulmom: [b]I think sodium lactate can be milk, but isn`t always milk. So many of the juices have calcium lactate and it isn`t milk either. Now that we have FALCPA, you will know if it is milk because it must actually have the word "milk" somewhere on the ingredient list if the lactate means milk.[/b]

I thought meat products were under the auspices of the USDA not the FDA. FALCPA only specifies what FDA products label and I was under the impression that meat products didn't have the mandatory labelling since they are USDA. See #15 [url="http://www.foodallergy.org/Advocacy/FALCPA_FAQ.pdf#search=%22falcpa%20faq%22"]http://www.foodallergy.org/Advocacy/FALCPA_FAQ.pdf#search=%22falcpa%20faq%22[/url]

------------------ Jana

[url="http://www.seattlefoodallergy.org"]www.seattlefoodallergy.org[/url]

[This message has been edited by Jana R (edited September 29, 2006).]

On Sep 29, 2006

That is an interesting point. I assumed that meant that deli meats (like when you walk up and order a pound of hamburger and they weigh it in the store) was under USDA and that meats that come from a manufacturer like the hot dogs are FDA (referring to the ones that arrive in the store already packaged with the ingredient list from an outside manufacturer). Maybe not. In any case, I did call FAAN over this sodium lactate issue and they said it isn`t milk. I also called one of the meat manufacturers (it was Carl Buddig---they make those packages of thinly sliced ham or turkey to put in a sandwich) and they said in their ham and turkey the sodium lactate is not milk. Maybe it is a case by case thing. I really thought the meats that arrive in the store from a manufacturer were subject to FALCPA, but maybe not.

On Sep 30, 2006

I hope you're right! I've been assuming that it wasn't. If you know of any reference that mentions meat products that the FDA regulates can you post it? So far in my web searches I haven't come across any. The closest I've come is this [url="http://www.fns.usda.gov/cga/PressReleases/2003/irradiation-qas.htm"]http://www.fns.usda.gov/cga/PressReleases/2003/irradiation-qas.htm[/url] where it mentions the FDA was looking into the petition to irradiate hot dogs.

The packages of hot dogs, pepperoni and ham in my fridge (ewww, I have too many processed meats!) all have a round circle and inside it says "U.S. Inspected And Passed By Department Of Agriculture". Pepperoni is the possible cause of my son's last hospitalization a few years ago - it turned out the lactic acid starter culture was derived from milk. So I was very disappointed (and continued to be cautious) when I learned that meat products were not included in FALCPA.

------------------ Jana

[url="http://www.seattlefoodallergy.org"]www.seattlefoodallergy.org[/url]

[This message has been edited by Jana R (edited September 30, 2006).]

On Sep 30, 2006

I`ve noticed that lactic acid starter culture now has the word "Milk" next to it in some Slim Jims or beef sticks. So that was another reason I was thinking that those outside manufacturers of meat products fall under FALCPA. If they don`t, I really need to know. I don`t want to assume that potassium lactate isn`t milk, if I am actually looking at an item that is exempt from FALCPA. I had to call the FDA last spring when dd had a cross contamination reaction to some roasted chicken in a store (Whole Foods). They said it falls under USDA and gave me another phone number. I`ll see if I can find the number of the person I reported it to and see what she says about the prepackaged meat products from an outside manufacturer.

On May 30, 2007

Bumping. Wondering about the potassium lactate listed on Ball Park beef hot dogs. I emailed Sara Lee and they claim it isn't milk. But I'm still hesitant to give these to DD.

On May 30, 2007

We are relatively new to the dairy allergy (2 yr old finally diagnosed!!!). But, Casein is a big problem for dairy allergic people. I am not sure exactly how it all fits together, but casein is a milk product but it does not necessarily have to be labeled as a milk product by law. So when buying dairy free cheeses etc, make sure the product is free of the obvious dairy products as well as whey and casein. The only guaranteed items become Vegan dairy free "cheese" products.

Also, some of the lactic acid is a starter culture (based in dairy) and some people do not react to it and others do. Lactic acid can be vegetable based which is then safe for Dairy/casein allergies.

Lunch meats are harder, the deli counters all have a "dairy only" slicer. But that is just for cheese. Lots of salami, pepperoni, procuitto, and parmesan crusted meats are cut on the regular meat slicers. (Mortadella contains Pistachios) and the slicers are wiped down at best between orders, so contamination is a huge problem in the deli counter. So....we are eliminating deli meat from our dairy free/casein free child and only buy deli meats when the store first opens or when they can clean the machine before cutting deli meat for our peanut allergic child.

I see a home grade meat slicer in my future [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

On May 30, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by hapi2bgf: [b]We are relatively new to the dairy allergy (2 yr old finally diagnosed!!!). But, Casein is a big problem for dairy allergic people. I am not sure exactly how it all fits together, but casein is a milk product but it does not necessarily have to be labeled as a milk product by law. So when buying dairy free cheeses etc, make sure the product is free of the obvious dairy products as well as whey and casein. The only guaranteed items become Vegan dairy free "cheese" products.

Also, some of the lactic acid is a starter culture (based in dairy) and some people do not react to it and others do. Lactic acid can be vegetable based which is then safe for Dairy/casein allergies.

Lunch meats are harder, the deli counters all have a "dairy only" slicer. But that is just for cheese. Lots of salami, pepperoni, procuitto, and parmesan crusted meats are cut on the regular meat slicers. (Mortadella contains Pistachios) and the slicers are wiped down at best between orders, so contamination is a huge problem in the deli counter. So....we are eliminating deli meat from our dairy free/casein free child and only buy deli meats when the store first opens or when they can clean the machine before cutting deli meat for our peanut allergic child.

I see a home grade meat slicer in my future [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img][/b]

hapi2bgf, caesin must be labeled as milk. It is actually milk protein. If something is milk derived, it must be labeled as so. Seeing as how caesin is such a major component, it would be labeled as such. Dairy free [i]is[/i] caesin free because caesin is dairy. Hope that makes sense.

We stay away from the deli, too. Theres such a variety of prepackaged items these days. But ya, great excuse for a slicer! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

[This message has been edited by lilpig99 (edited May 30, 2007).]

On May 30, 2007

I believe for all products produced in the USA after 1/1/06 it has to state "milk" somewhere in or near the ingredients if any milk derivative is included. This would include milk in flavorings or in something like potassium lactate, if it is milk derived. Also if casein or something like sodium caseinate is included it must say milk.

This does NOT apply to traces of milk that may be contained due to contamination, eg with shared production lines.

As far as I know, there is no regulation of putting "dairy free" on a label. I have seen "dairy free" cheese which includes milk ingredients. I think it is sometimes written to mean lactose free, so it may be OK for someone with lactose intolerance but not someone with a dairy allergy. So read the ingredients even if it says "dairy free".

Vegan items as well as kosher pareve items sould be free of all dairy, but there may still be some traces through contaimination.

On May 30, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by bonestable: [b]I believe for all products produced in the USA after 1/1/06 it has to state "milk" somewhere in or near the ingredients if any milk derivative is included. This would include milk in flavorings or in something like potassium lactate, if it is milk derived. Also if casein or something like sodium caseinate is included it must say milk.

[/b]

Not quite [b]all[/b] products...

[b]What types of foods are covered by the FALCPA labeling requirements? [/b] FALCPA's requirements apply to all packaged foods sold in the U.S. that are regulated under the Federal Food, Drug, & Cosmetic Act, including both domestically manufactured and imported foods. FDA regulates all foods [b]except[/b] meat products, poultry products, and egg products.

[url="http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/alrguid4.html"]http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/alrguid4.html[/url]

On May 30, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by 2BusyBoys: [b] Not quite [b]all[/b] products...

[b]What types of foods are covered by the FALCPA labeling requirements? [/b] FALCPA's requirements apply to all packaged foods sold in the U.S. that are regulated under the Federal Food, Drug, & Cosmetic Act, including both domestically manufactured and imported foods. FDA regulates all foods [b]except[/b] meat products, poultry products, and egg products.

[url="http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/alrguid4.html"]http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/alrguid4.html[/url]

[/b]

So does this mean that labelling for hot dogs, lunch meats, frozen chicken nuggets etc. does NOT have to specify the top 8 with plain english? I am seriously confused now! So new question: Has anyone had any type of reaction or problems with a meat or poultry item with unclear labeling?

Just trying, as always, to reasses my comfort zone. We are dealing with multiple food allergies , and it's so frustrating with labeling inconsistencies! Why in the he!! are these products not subject to clear labeling as well? Are we not entitled to safely choose meat products for our FA kids?

Sorry for the rant...bad day [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

On May 30, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by JacksonsMom: [b] So does this mean that labelling for hot dogs, lunch meats, frozen chicken nuggets etc. does NOT have to specify the top 8 with plain english? I am seriously confused now!

[/b]

See previous posts in this thread. If the package is stamped USDA then it isn't covered by the label law. If the item is a packaged/processed product (like chicken nuggets for example) then the law should apply. When in doubt, call the manufacturer. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On May 31, 2007

My Tyson chicken nuggetts (frozen in the red bag) are stamped USDA. They have a contains wheat statement on them, but also list 'spice' and 'natural flavor' and claim to be fried in 'vegetable oil'. These were red flags to me before the labeling laws changes, and yes, I would have called on every new bag. But since the law changed I have taken the label for its word. I guess that will have to change. Never thought that I'd be looking for the USDA stamp too! Let me add that to my grocery shopping fun.....

(dripping with sarcasm, can't you tell)

Thanks everyone for the info, I had NO idea about these loopholes. Is FAAN working on this? Maybe I need to give them a call.

On May 31, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by 2BusyBoys: [b] See previous posts in this thread. If the package is stamped USDA then it isn't covered by the label law. If the item is a packaged/processed product (like chicken nuggets for example) then the law should apply. When in doubt, call the manufacturer. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img][/b]

I called the FDA and USDA about this after my post earlier in this thread. They said that packaged meat products are exempt from FALCPA. I previously thought that only meat products you walk up and order are exempt, but they said no, that all meat products (poultry, beef, etc) are exempt from FALCPA.

On May 31, 2007

Another hot dog to try is Butterball Turkey hot dogs, they don't have any of those in their label.

On May 31, 2007

I will look for the Butterball Turkey Dogs. Haven't seen those before - we are also dealing with soy allergies so most hot dogs have soy - especially the Kosher ones I've looked at. Ball Park have been the only soy free I've found yet.

On May 31, 2007

Are you looking for turkey specifically? We use Best Kosher and have never had a problem, but they are beef. I don't think we've ever had a milk/soy free turkey dog.

On May 31, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by 2BusyBoys: Not quite [b]all[/b] products...

[b]What types of foods are covered by the FALCPA labeling requirements? [/b] FALCPA's requirements apply to all packaged foods sold in the U.S. that are regulated under the Federal Food, Drug, & Cosmetic Act, including both domestically manufactured and imported foods. FDA regulates all foods [b]except[/b] meat products, poultry products, and egg products.

The FDA also does not regulate alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine or liquor. These are regulated by the TTB and do not have to follow FALCPA.

[This message has been edited by Momcat (edited May 31, 2007).]

On May 31, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by booandbrimom: [b]Are you looking for turkey specifically? We use Best Kosher and have never had a problem, but they are beef. I don't think we've ever had a milk/soy free turkey dog.[/b]

No I would prefer beef, but would be happy with any kind that is soy and milk free! There aren't many choices. Most I've seen have soy protien. Is Best Kosher soy and dairy free? I don't recall that brand name, what grocery store carries them ?(I am on the east coast, will do a search and see if I can find those). Thanks!

On May 31, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by Momcat: [b] The FDA also does not regulate alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine or liquor. These are regulated by the TTB and do not have to follow FALCPA.

[This message has been edited by Momcat (edited May 31, 2007).][/b]

Good to know, luckily we have another 16 years before we need to read liquor labels for DS!

On May 31, 2007

Best Kosher is milk and soy free. As to where to get them, you'll have to ask around. I'm on the north side of Chicago and we have a large orthodox Jewish contingent here, for which we're extremely thankful because it gives us a ton more parave food options. I joke with my friends that I have a kitchen that's more kosher than theirs!

Regarding booze, we haven't had any problems yet. (For the wags out there, we're [i]cooking[/i] with it, not using it as a sleepy-time aid.) However, I have heard anecdotally that some dark beers may contain milk-derived ingredients. Not sure is this is true or not. We also haven't used Bailey's or other cream liquors - they often won't tell you what's in them.

Ah, the fun of milk allergy. I just got through the kissing conversation. I'm just not ready for the boozing one yet.

On Jun 1, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by booandbrimom: [b] Ah, the fun of milk allergy. I just got through the kissing conversation. I'm just not ready for the boozing one yet.[/b]

My ds is only 5. Those conversations don't sound exactly like a blast to me. I'll keep my head in the sand on that one for a while...

**************

As far as hot dogs go, milk and soy free, Hummel is another brand. We're in CT, they're made in CT, not sure how national they are.

On Jun 1, 2007

Esskay chicken hot dogs are milk-free. Not sure about soy.

PA, TNA, DA and EA DD's new favorite food is low sodium chicken flavor Rice-a-Roni. She wants it every night. We make it with canola oil so there is no trans fat.

On Jun 1, 2007

jacksonmom-- if you choose a kosher brand of hot dog they dont mix dairy with meat. it makes it a little easier.

we are no longer dealing with the dairy allergy, but when we were i did alot of shopping in the kosher section of our grocery store.

erin

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