For asthma anyones little ones on...

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 12:14am
Samber's picture
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Joined: 06/22/2006 - 09:00

My dd's allergist just gave her Singulair and Zyrtec to take each evening as her maintenance dosing. She only had one asthma attack with a cold but he feels it my escalate. She is 3. My story is under "I'm very Upset..."
Anyone else on both of these daily?
Thank you

Samber

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 12:45am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

Samber, I've been following your posts with your daughter. I think they gave you some great meds and you should see some great improvements here soon. We've never had Singulair, but I have asked about tyring it. My kiddos are on Zyrtec and Flovent instead....we've had Zyrtec sinc ethey were under age 1...it helps their allergy issues(environmental/season etc..). Some experince side effects(as with any medication), we're not one of them. My son could take it in the morning and not feel a thing, he often took it at night and on bad days again in the morning. Never made him sleepy or grouchy or off....it worked well for us...I hope you have the same results. Good luck [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 12:54am
bethc's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

My 7YO DD has asthma and is on Singulair daily. She's taken it for about a year now, and I think she took it during her pollen allergy seasons for the year before. Based on the information I've read, it doesn't worry me, and I do tend to worry about kids (or anyone, really) being on a medication all the time. It is important to keep asthma under control, because if it isn't under control, you can get lung scarring, you can have dangerous episodes, and you can end up needing oral steroids, which do have effects on the whole body. She did take Zyrtec for a while, but she didn't seem to need it last time she had a pollen season that bothers her. Nasonex nasal spray did enough, and that's a localized treatment, which is nice. Not pleasant for her though, and I can't imagine a 3YO wanting to be sprayed in the nose.
So your DD had one asthma attack ever, and they want to put her on maintenance treatment? I've had multiple Drs. tell me that you can't diagnose asthma quickly, from one or two episodes. It's a pattern over time. My DD's diagnosis came months after her asthma began, because there were so many things to rule out and to try -- besides that it was mostly a cough, not wheezing and acute distress. My 9YO niece had basically an asthma attack with a cold when she was very little, and she got a nebulizer to use with that cold, but it didn't happen again and she doesn't have asthma.
At least Singulair and Zyrtec are both allergy medicines (Singulair is for both asthma and allergies), so she isn't strictly on asthma meds. But I guess I'd be a little skeptical this early on.

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 1:15am
Samber's picture
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Joined: 06/22/2006 - 09:00

When I brought her in to the allergist she was obstucted enough that he though she might have swallowed something. The albuterol treatment cleared it right up. Then she skin tested high for grasses, trees, pollens, and now GARLIC is as high as peanut and egg which he said he never saw before.
I was skeptical to,but I don't know. When she barely runs around she is short of breath a bit. Not wheezing or coughing but noticeable heavier breathing.
Is it to aggressive to soon????

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 1:38am
mistey's picture
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Joined: 01/18/2004 - 09:00

My ds was dx with asthma at ~6 months of age. He has a very severe case of it. It took a LOOOOONG time to find the right meds to help him. He is currently taking Flovent 220 (2 puffs twice a day), Claritin (1 t once a day) and Singulair. This so far has been the best combo of drugs for him.

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 1:44am
turtle's picture
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Joined: 12/10/2004 - 09:00

My son has been on singulair daily and claritan from April-October since he was 2. He will soon be five. He very rarely has any asthma related issues. I questioned 3 doctors about the long term effects of Singulair and they all assured me it was safe and the right thing to do.

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 1:54am
bethc's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

Oh, I don't think it's sounds too aggressive, unless they're saying she's officially diagnosed with asthma this moment. If albuterol relieved the terrible breathing difficulties, that is one sign that it's asthma. The fact that she gets out of breath from running is another. If she has really bad environmental allergies like that, the 2 allergy meds she's on are probably a good idea. Again, Singulair will help both problems, and nowadays it's approved as an allergy med. So it's not like they even have her on steroids. I hope they'll continue to consider whether it's really asthma or not based on future evaluations. But it's good that they're taking it seriously when albuterol fixed her asthma episode.
My DD had an "asthma-like episode" (officially called) where the Dr. said her airways were so tight, no air was getting to her lower lungs. This was when she was 4. The Dr. said it sounded terrible, although her blood oxygen levels weren't terrible, just reduced. In hindsight, we believe it was a peanut reaction. We didn't know back then that may-contains were risky for her, and she ate some in the evening, different things than she normally ate. Then she had a delayed reaction overnight. She also had stomach pain and a racing heartbeat, but we didn't know those were symptoms of anaphylaxis, we just thought they were happening because she couldn't breathe properly. The Dr. never considered the possibility any more than we did. I'm not saying that's what happened to your DD. But I've been there when they've been astonished at how air was blocked from going into my DD's lungs. An albuterol treatment improved things in that case, but didn't fix them outright. She had to use albuterol for a few days and take prednisolone for several. She did develop asthma a year later, but it's never been impeded breathing at all. It's been a persistent cough with maybe a little wheezing when she has a cold, and that's completely under control with Pulmicort and Singulair now.

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 2:12am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I don't have time for a long reply, but my son is on Zyrtec and Singulair as well as Advair for his asthma...the Singulair has changed our lives! He used to get asthma attacks whenever he was sick, now I can't remember the last time we have had to use the nebulizer or his rescue meds. Especially for food allergic kids it is so important to agressively control the asthma.
My son has been on these drugs for about 3 years now -- life savers.
------------------
mom to Ari(6) - severe nut allergies, asthma, you name it - and Maya (9), mild excema

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 2:29am
Samber's picture
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Joined: 06/22/2006 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by that'smetrying:
[b]I don't have time for a long reply, but my son is on Zyrtec and Singulair as well as Advair for his asthma...the Singulair has changed our lives! He used to get asthma attacks whenever he was sick, now I can't remember the last time we have had to use the nebulizer or his rescue meds. Especially for food allergic kids it is so important to agressively control the asthma.
My son has been on these drugs for about 3 years now -- life savers.
[/b]
Thank you so much! I am nervous about it all over again and it's good to know that perhaps I won't have to worry so much. I was surprised that he put her on both with only one episode triggered by her cold, but he did say, as you did, that with her food allergies, then developing asthma, he wanted to be mildly aggressive at this point.
Samber

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