Food help

Posted on: Sat, 05/06/2006 - 4:23am
Julie1079's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/22/2006 - 09:00

My son is 10.5 months old and has yet to try anything but baby food and Gerber fruit puffs. What are some ideas I can start giving him??? I'm so nervous to try anything. Please help!!!!

Posted on: Sat, 05/06/2006 - 5:25am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

You don't say what sort of baby food. I would go for the "real" versions of things he is already eating. So-- sweet potatoes, diced and cooked so that he can eat them as finger food. If he has a good set of teeth, Cheerios are usually good at about this age. VERY plain fruits and vegetables, well-cooked. Just don't add the salt/sugar/fat that you would for an adult palate.
This way you control the texture, size and firmness of foods your child is trying. Plus you know where the food is coming from and you can wash it very thoroughly first.
Oatmeal was also a favorite of my daughter-- it had more texture than baby food but was still very safe. She also liked cream of wheat and cream of rice. Later Graham crackers and plain Chex cereals were great.
We really didn't give her much in the way of protein-containing foods until she was older... and began self-weaning... hmmmmm....
This is when our pediatrician suggested crumbled egg yolk (advice we thankfully ignored) or even some creamy PB.
HEY.
That's how we ended up [i]here[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
As long as bebe is still getting formula/breast milk, they really don't need a lot of other protein for a long time.
JMO, but be very very careful with the "baby food" pastas, mixed dinners, and the like. They frequently contain egg- or dairy-based ingredients. We think this is how DD was sensitized to egg. Cross-contaminated pasta.
HTH [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
(This is such a fun time! Enjoy it!)

Posted on: Sat, 05/06/2006 - 6:59am
TNAmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/29/2005 - 09:00

My daughter loved sliced avocado when she was little. Soft and safe, and yummy too.

Posted on: Mon, 05/08/2006 - 7:49am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Quote:Originally posted by Corvallis Mom:
[b]You don't say what sort of baby food. I would go for the "real" versions of things he is already eating. So-- sweet potatoes, diced and cooked so that he can eat them as finger food. If he has a good set of teeth, Cheerios are usually good at about this age. VERY plain fruits and vegetables, well-cooked. Just don't add the salt/sugar/fat that you would for an adult palate.
This way you control the texture, size and firmness of foods your child is trying. Plus you know where the food is coming from and you can wash it very thoroughly first.
Oatmeal was also a favorite of my daughter-- it had more texture than baby food but was still very safe. She also liked cream of wheat and cream of rice. Later Graham crackers and plain Chex cereals were great.
We really didn't give her much in the way of protein-containing foods until she was older... and began self-weaning... hmmmmm....
This is when our pediatrician suggested crumbled egg yolk (advice we thankfully ignored) or even some creamy PB.
HEY.
That's how we ended up [i]here[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
As long as bebe is still getting formula/breast milk, they really don't need a lot of other protein for a long time.
JMO, but be very very careful with the "baby food" pastas, mixed dinners, and the like. They frequently contain egg- or dairy-based ingredients. We think this is how DD was sensitized to egg. Cross-contaminated pasta.
HTH [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
(This is such a fun time! Enjoy it!)
[/b]
Are the things that you listed all safe for a baby w/peanut allergy?

Posted on: Mon, 05/08/2006 - 8:04am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Sorry-- I thought at first that you were our long-time resident poster with a similar username! (wondered why Amy was asking that question...)
To answer your question... yes.. BUT.
(Always a "but," huh?)
You will need to make certain that you are comfortable with each product-- we have used Quaker oats and quick oats for many years, for example. Graham crackers are a wonderful snack, but you will need to check brands carefully.
This is why I said that it is probably best to go with foods that your child is already eating (and presumably tolerating well) in "baby food." As for protein intake, which pediatricians all seem inordinately concerned about... IMPO, with atopic kids who already have [i]one[/i] FA, why offer other high-risk foods at all?? As long as they are on formula or breast milk, they are still getting fats and proteins there.
Personally, the only members of the big 8 that I would introduce before 12 mo. would be wheat (maybe) and dairy (if they are already consuming formula or Mom has it in her diet and is breastfeeding). JMO.
(I say this as someone who lived through having a toddler who was allergic to every member of the big 8 that she had been exposed to. ) I really wish that we hadn't offered wheat or dairy either one until she was older. The pb goes without saying. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Fruits and vegetables are some of the safest foods from an atopic standpoint. The exceptions? Bananas, mangoes, kiwi, avocado, and legumes (beans, peas, etc.) all have an elevated potential to induce sensitivity.
HTH [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Mon, 05/08/2006 - 12:44pm
Julie1079's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/22/2006 - 09:00

Thank you for replying and yes, your info has helped. I will start with the foods he is already eating. I'm nervous about other foods when he gets older - worried about cross contam and all that jazz.
I just found out today he is mildly allergic to wheat but he's had wheat flour in Gerber snacks before and been fine. My allergist wants to do a food challenge if the blood work comes back negative.
Thank you for your time!

Posted on: Wed, 05/10/2006 - 2:00am
momtotwokidz's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/02/2005 - 09:00

There is a food milll grinder out that can take the meals you are eating and just grind them up and then you can serve them, cheaper than keeping with just baby food.
My daughter can eat, deli turkey, chicken, sweet peas (they are very soft), steamed yams, carrots (I steam the carrots a little longer to make them softer), I make breads without sugar, salt and she eats those, chunks of banana, if you use canned fruit (esp for pears), use the ones with fruit juice and not syrup, and cut them up.
puffed wheat, cheerios. Crackers, (try to get with low salt or no salt). Beans are great, black beans, and the white kidney beans we have tried. Bread.
My daughter has for the most part refused baby food. I keep trying to get her to taste veggies, but I server her what we are eating, I do not hold back on spices as this is what we did with my son, and he has become picky on things with lots of spices (but not spicy), so her palate is getting used to what we eat.
Can you tell I also have a 10 month old, the suggestions arwe fresh.
THerese

Posted on: Sat, 05/06/2006 - 5:25am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

You don't say what sort of baby food. I would go for the "real" versions of things he is already eating. So-- sweet potatoes, diced and cooked so that he can eat them as finger food. If he has a good set of teeth, Cheerios are usually good at about this age. VERY plain fruits and vegetables, well-cooked. Just don't add the salt/sugar/fat that you would for an adult palate.
This way you control the texture, size and firmness of foods your child is trying. Plus you know where the food is coming from and you can wash it very thoroughly first.
Oatmeal was also a favorite of my daughter-- it had more texture than baby food but was still very safe. She also liked cream of wheat and cream of rice. Later Graham crackers and plain Chex cereals were great.
We really didn't give her much in the way of protein-containing foods until she was older... and began self-weaning... hmmmmm....
This is when our pediatrician suggested crumbled egg yolk (advice we thankfully ignored) or even some creamy PB.
HEY.
That's how we ended up [i]here[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
As long as bebe is still getting formula/breast milk, they really don't need a lot of other protein for a long time.
JMO, but be very very careful with the "baby food" pastas, mixed dinners, and the like. They frequently contain egg- or dairy-based ingredients. We think this is how DD was sensitized to egg. Cross-contaminated pasta.
HTH [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
(This is such a fun time! Enjoy it!)

Posted on: Sat, 05/06/2006 - 6:59am
TNAmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/29/2005 - 09:00

My daughter loved sliced avocado when she was little. Soft and safe, and yummy too.

Posted on: Mon, 05/08/2006 - 7:49am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Quote:Originally posted by Corvallis Mom:
[b]You don't say what sort of baby food. I would go for the "real" versions of things he is already eating. So-- sweet potatoes, diced and cooked so that he can eat them as finger food. If he has a good set of teeth, Cheerios are usually good at about this age. VERY plain fruits and vegetables, well-cooked. Just don't add the salt/sugar/fat that you would for an adult palate.
This way you control the texture, size and firmness of foods your child is trying. Plus you know where the food is coming from and you can wash it very thoroughly first.
Oatmeal was also a favorite of my daughter-- it had more texture than baby food but was still very safe. She also liked cream of wheat and cream of rice. Later Graham crackers and plain Chex cereals were great.
We really didn't give her much in the way of protein-containing foods until she was older... and began self-weaning... hmmmmm....
This is when our pediatrician suggested crumbled egg yolk (advice we thankfully ignored) or even some creamy PB.
HEY.
That's how we ended up [i]here[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
As long as bebe is still getting formula/breast milk, they really don't need a lot of other protein for a long time.
JMO, but be very very careful with the "baby food" pastas, mixed dinners, and the like. They frequently contain egg- or dairy-based ingredients. We think this is how DD was sensitized to egg. Cross-contaminated pasta.
HTH [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
(This is such a fun time! Enjoy it!)
[/b]
Are the things that you listed all safe for a baby w/peanut allergy?

Posted on: Mon, 05/08/2006 - 8:04am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Sorry-- I thought at first that you were our long-time resident poster with a similar username! (wondered why Amy was asking that question...)
To answer your question... yes.. BUT.
(Always a "but," huh?)
You will need to make certain that you are comfortable with each product-- we have used Quaker oats and quick oats for many years, for example. Graham crackers are a wonderful snack, but you will need to check brands carefully.
This is why I said that it is probably best to go with foods that your child is already eating (and presumably tolerating well) in "baby food." As for protein intake, which pediatricians all seem inordinately concerned about... IMPO, with atopic kids who already have [i]one[/i] FA, why offer other high-risk foods at all?? As long as they are on formula or breast milk, they are still getting fats and proteins there.
Personally, the only members of the big 8 that I would introduce before 12 mo. would be wheat (maybe) and dairy (if they are already consuming formula or Mom has it in her diet and is breastfeeding). JMO.
(I say this as someone who lived through having a toddler who was allergic to every member of the big 8 that she had been exposed to. ) I really wish that we hadn't offered wheat or dairy either one until she was older. The pb goes without saying. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Fruits and vegetables are some of the safest foods from an atopic standpoint. The exceptions? Bananas, mangoes, kiwi, avocado, and legumes (beans, peas, etc.) all have an elevated potential to induce sensitivity.
HTH [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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