Food Allergies not that serious!

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 5:39am
abigailsmoma's picture
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I took my 2 1/2 daughter today to a new allergist. When we got back in the room My husband and I noticed that everything on the walls was about enviromental allergies only. I took him serious pictures of her outbreaks (Of course they were taken after treating her) and he said they were just contact reactions. I wish I new how to load pictures on here so you could see his idea of a contact or friction. He said that her allergist last year was wrong and just trying to scare me. Food allergies are not common and not life threatening!!! He was suprised that I even carried a epi at all times. He went ahead and retested her in our hopes that she had outgrown some of them. Know instead of just soy, peas, peanut, shrimp, cockroach, blue 1 and egg, she has tree nuts, corn, dogs, and mold. He told me not to worry about a mold problem we have just discovered in our fireplace. He said it couldn't affect her. We have a double open sided fireplace.
He also told me that when she had her Anaphylactic reaction that it was not important to go to the doctor or use epi. Even though her airways were closing she would be ok later. Which we all know that if I hadn't got her to the doctor we wouldn't even be having this conversation. He wanted me to give her peanuts to see if she was really allergic. Even though 2 nights ago she broke out from sunmaid raisins produced on a peanut line. I had heard enfough after that.
I could go on and on on more stuff he said but I am just to angry.
I feel helpless confused and tired. I have worked hard to get my husband to undersatnd how serious this is to just be slapped in the face.
I have so many questions now. He said the only way I could tell if she was really allergic is to give her the food and wait and see. If she don't break out she isn't allergic. Is that right? That is not what I been told before. Do I get rid of my dog that I have only had for a couple of months before she gets attached. Will her dog allergy get worse.
I know this is long and alot of spelling wrong sorry just venting quicky!
Help! Help Help!

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 5:44am
solarflare's picture
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Run, don't walk, to a new allergist, even if it means a longer drive to see a competent one.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 6:06am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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I agree... is this physician AAAI certified? If so, you should report this.
This kind of advice, given to someone who doesn't know better, is definitely malpractice. Sorry- I don't feel like using a euphemism. This guy actually advised you that with peanut anaphylaxis, you [i]did not need to seek emergent care??[/i]
Report him to your state medical board. He shouldn't be taking FA patients if this is how he sees things.
JMO.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 6:13am
turtle's picture
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I am so sorry you had such a bad time. That doctor obviously needs some help. Go find a new allergist right away.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 6:14am
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yes, I agree...RUN to a new allergist. This just goes beyond anything I have ever heard. So completely ridiculous, that I can't even waste anymore typing on him!!!!! ARGH!!!
Ok, about the mold and dog. I recently looked online about molds, as my parents have some in their basement. It is serious...some types of mold are much worse health wise than others. Mold needs moisture to survive. Get rid of the moisture (and keep it away) and you will solve your mold problem. There are many ways to clean it. But DO do something about it...it is not good for anyone to breathe that stuff...especially an atopic child.
My dd age 5, developed her allergy to dogs at age 2ish. Our dog is a K9 dog and we simply cannot get rid of him (as in give away) or I'd do it. She ended up developing asthma from it as well. Since we've moved to a new home, we have the dog contained in our laundry area (with a tile floor) as we call it. She rarely even touches the dog as she'll break out in hives. I am glad now that there is extremely little dander about our new home now. My suggestion, would be to give your dog to someone who can give it a good home. If that is not possible, do your best to contain the dog in one area of the home where your child cannot access and the allergen has a much lesser chance of being spread throughout the home. No fun for the dog really, but your daughters health may demand it.
Most of all,...good luck. It's been a tough day for you with all of the revelations you've had. Keep your chin up!

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 6:56am
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[img]http://www.thesmilies.com/smilies/surprised/jaw-dropping.gif[/img]
So sorry you had this experience. I agree w/ pp- RUN to another allergist!

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 7:37am
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Quote:Originally posted by Corvallis Mom:
[b]I agree... is this physician AAAI certified? If so, you should report this.
This kind of advice, given to someone who doesn't know better, is definitely malpractice.
Report him to your state medical board. He shouldn't be taking FA patients if this is how he sees things.
[/b]
My thoughts exactly.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 9:44am
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I went to the AAAAI board and it says his special is Rhinitis, Sinusitis. I guess that explains him not knowing much on food allergies or which food was in what food group.
Thank you all for the support. I of course will not be going back to this doctor. We had taken her about 2 hours away to her first allergist and I thought with as many problems I have had we needed one closer.
He actullay asked me would I like to just put her in a bubble! I told him if that is what I have to do to protect my child I would. The more I think about the day the more steamed I got.
As for the dog and mold thank you. We will be getting the mold issue taken care of right away. The dog is an outdoor dog only. She is bigger then Abby so I usually tie her up when Abby is playing out side. It scares her when she comes running for force and jumps on her.
If anyone can tell me how to post a picture I will post one of reaction.
I am so thankful to have great understanding people like you to talk to.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 1:09pm
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I have been researching this Dr. more. I had actually researced his dad instead of him. This Dr. is a Doctor of Osteopathic and Internal Medicine. What is that?

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 1:24pm
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i believe it would mean he's a DO rather than an MD. i think the difference is that one is trained in standard medical school and the other trained in an osteopathic school of medicine. we have many DO's where we live. i'm not sure if one would be better than the other for pediatric allergies.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 4:42pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
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It means he does not have any particular specialty in allergy or immunology, that's what it means.
He's an "internist" or a "general practitioner."

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 10:53pm
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I don't think i would be able to contain myself during an office visit like this. I would write him a letter along with material to support the fact that food allergies are on the rise and are very serious.
I would have to have my say to this dr. What if a newly diagnosed person goes to see him and that person is given this type of information? That could put a child at serious risk.

Posted on: Wed, 06/14/2006 - 5:24am
Christabelle's picture
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This is a new level of incompetence!
Write a letter to him expressing how shockingly bad and incompetent his advice is, and how dangerous it is.
Also, report him to whatever appropriate agency you can. This guy is scary.

Posted on: Wed, 06/14/2006 - 7:16am
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Report him to the state medical board before he kills someone with his incompetence.
Could he be on drugs? Or have a mental problem? He sounds pretty boastful..could be in the manic phase of bi-polar.

Posted on: Mon, 06/19/2006 - 1:35pm
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I have thought about writing him a letter, but most people like him that are that full of themself it don't phase.
I have been so busy with my daughter this week. Since she had the skin prick test she has had problems of hives and itching. We also had the problem with the sunmaid raisins just a week ago. I am going to report the JERK to the medical board though. I also thought I would contact some places like FAAN and Epi Pen and let them know that he says you can't really die from an Anaphylactic reaction! Maybe they can send him so info. Any suggestions on what I do to report him to medical board?

Posted on: Mon, 06/19/2006 - 2:04pm
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OMG I can't believe I just read that, but otoh I can. Some of these docs are NOT as educated as the piece of paper on their wall states they are.
As far as contacting the state board, I would first contact a mal-practice lawyer in your state. no wait, first, I would take your daughter to a new doctor to have the reactions treated that she's already having. Even if it means going back 2 hours away to the first doc that you used to go to -- go to someone who knows what they're doing, with a proven record. THEN have that doctor write up a statement of what they saw with the daughter. And also contact a lawyer to find out what they would suggest.
Most everything can be looked up online, as well as reports filed on-line, depending on your state.
Good luck!

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 12:35am
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Quote:Originally posted by Corvallis Mom:
[b]It means he does not have any particular specialty in allergy or immunology, that's what it means.
He's an "internist" or a "general practitioner."[/b]
. . . in ADULT medicine, not pediatrics.
Our allergist is Board Certified in both "Pediatrics" and "Allergy & Immunology" which is ideal IMO. My DH is an internist, and he tells me that treating adults and children can be very different.

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 1:43am
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b] . . . in ADULT medicine, not pediatrics.
Our allergist is Board Certified in both "Pediatrics" and "Allergy & Immunology" which is ideal IMO. My DH is an internist, and he tells me that treating adults and children can be very different. [/b]
and in addition, isn't a "DO" trained in *everything* an "MD" would be [i]but with additional training[/i] as well as a different [i]perspective[/i]? I'm not sure, but just wondering, and it's my general impression (having worked with a considerable number of them). But I could be wrong....

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 2:03am
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[url="http://www.stronghealth.com/services/primarycare/domd.cfm"]http://www.stronghealth.com/services/primarycare/domd.cfm[/url]
[url="http://www.princetonreview.com/medical/research/articles/decide/DOissues.asp"]http://www.princetonreview.com/medical/research/articles/decide/DOissues.asp[/url]
General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. I do not guarantee the accuracy, currentness, applicability, or content of the links in this post. Individual Mileage May Vary.

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 3:57am
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In my experience, DO's are much more laid back when it comes to treating patients - prefer to take a wait and see approach rather than jumping on a runny nose with antibiotics. For me - this is the perfect doctor because I don't have any life threatening conditions that I know of (with the exception of my ana to ingested banana which I have been able to control easily enough.) Honestly, I wouldn't even mind a DO for my son when it comes to colds, ear infections, immunizations and such.
Now, having said all that - I would never take my son to see a DO regarding his allergies because it would be like asking most of my husband's family to treat his allergies - "It's not that big a deal."
My allergist did explain to me that the only true way to know if an allergy is a true allergy is to ingest it, in her office, and see if there is a reaction. However, in the case of ana possible reactions, ie PN and TN that this should never be done for several reasons. Number one being that it is extremely dangerous! The second reason, PN and TN may start out as mild reactions, but the more exposure you have, the more likely that the reaction will become worse. She told me that I am better off assuming the worst and going about my life thinking that the smallest exposure could be an issue.
Good luck in finding a better allergist or practitioner - I know how hard it can be!
------------------
Mommy to Aiden 1/26/05 PA,wheat,barley,soy,egg and others yet to be discovered DS#2 is due July 15, 2006 who we hope will be AF

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 6:18am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Exactly. I would actually be pretty happy with a DO as our primary care provider... IF that person understood [i]perfectly[/i] when they were out of their depth.
This would include the knee problems DH and I both suffer from, our entire family's atopy, and DH's family hx of diabetes. Although knowing all of those things could lead a DO to make very accurate assessments about specialist care. Just like our family practice MD does. He isn't an "expert" but that isn't what we see him for. We like all seeing the same physician for years on end-- he knows us. [i]Well.[/i] And this is critical to good care for chronic or emergent conditions. JMO.
But what I thought was wrong/unprofessional of this physician was to represent himself as an "allergist" when he is clearly not competent in that capacity.

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 7:30am
abigailsmoma's picture
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Thanks for the links and info on the doctors.
I feel so stupid that I didn't research this man before I went to him.
Abby has had a break out almost every day now since she had the skin test. She rarely ever broke out around dogs and know it is horrible. Why after the skin test is she breaking out worse? None of this make any sense to me.

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 8:32am
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Don't beat yourself up on not researching the doctor - we have all been there. Heck, I'm still there. You would think after nearly a year of my pediatrician making me feel like an idiot (he still doesn't believe DS allergies were part of his failure to thrive when we were breastfeeding - in fact, he isn't concerned about his allergies to begin with), you would think I would have found another doctor. However, DS is relatively healthy and I just find myself dreading his milestone check-ups - I mean to the point of not ever wanting to make them. Between DS being underweight (he eats like a horse, but has multiple food allergies and boundless energy)and wanting to delay further vax'ing until he is 2 (we had issues with each vax with eczema going out of control) - I dread seeing him because he does make me feel like the worst mother in the world. I'm working on finding a new ped, just trying to make sure I find the right match this time...preferably before DS#2 is born.
Regarding the dog, DS tested positive to dog as well. We went round and round because our dog was such a huge part of our life and at the time, was the only one who could make my son laugh. I couldn't decide which was crueler - the PA diagnosis or the allergy to the dog. (As I write this, DS is trying to convince the dog he is a horse so he can ride him!) Obviously we didn't get rid of the dog. We tried washing him on a weekly basis, keeping the licks to my DS to a minimum ( he will break out in welts after an excessive licking spree) and just doing our best to vacuum daily the common areas and keep the dog out of DS room (we are a little more lax now since DS is in a room with linoleum as opposed to carpet). I do notice during the pollen season, DS did have more reactions to the dog. Of course Radar seemed to have more allergic reactions himself. To help both of them, I kept Radar in as much as possible and vacuumed (yes, vacuumed him) after he went out before he made it into contact with DS. Actually vaccuuming Radar is something I do on a fairly regular basis - he enjoys it and I think it helps keep the fur and dander down.
I can't remember how long it has been since your daughter had her allergy test, but she may still be reacting. You may want to keep up with benadryl or check with your pediatrician. I seem to remember DS having issues for awhile after his skin test.
------------------
Mommy to Aiden 1/26/05 PA,wheat,barley,soy,egg and others yet to be discovered DS#2 is due July 15, 2006 who we hope will be AF

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 12:45pm
Lori Jo's picture
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First...run quickly to a new doctor, as stated before. That guy sounds just horrible.
Second...as an MD, I have to weigh in on the DO/MD difference. I don't think there is a huge difference between the two ON AVERAGE. I have worked with, or been friends, with very talented, well trained DO's. These were all people who did residencies in everything from pediatric trauma surgery to family practice. I know some MD's who I wouldn't send my dog to. The biggest issue with the doctor your ds saw is whether he did an Allergy and Immuno residency, and is he board certified. Doctors do advertise as specialists because they take extra courses, have an extra interest, etc, but have no formalized, accredited (?sp) training. Is this always bad? No. We have a general practictioner around here (rural area) who does only derm. For most acne/warts/etc, that is just fine. For something as specialized as my dd's PA, we drive 3 hours to see a board certified pediatric allergist. Your state medical board should be able to tell you who is board certified, and in what.
Good luck and sorry you had to go thru all that.
------------------
Lori Jo,
Rose, 7-31-02, PA
Beatrice & Georgia, 8-14-99

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 5:44am
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Run, don't walk, to a new allergist, even if it means a longer drive to see a competent one.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 6:06am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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I agree... is this physician AAAI certified? If so, you should report this.
This kind of advice, given to someone who doesn't know better, is definitely malpractice. Sorry- I don't feel like using a euphemism. This guy actually advised you that with peanut anaphylaxis, you [i]did not need to seek emergent care??[/i]
Report him to your state medical board. He shouldn't be taking FA patients if this is how he sees things.
JMO.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 6:13am
turtle's picture
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I am so sorry you had such a bad time. That doctor obviously needs some help. Go find a new allergist right away.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 6:14am
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yes, I agree...RUN to a new allergist. This just goes beyond anything I have ever heard. So completely ridiculous, that I can't even waste anymore typing on him!!!!! ARGH!!!
Ok, about the mold and dog. I recently looked online about molds, as my parents have some in their basement. It is serious...some types of mold are much worse health wise than others. Mold needs moisture to survive. Get rid of the moisture (and keep it away) and you will solve your mold problem. There are many ways to clean it. But DO do something about it...it is not good for anyone to breathe that stuff...especially an atopic child.
My dd age 5, developed her allergy to dogs at age 2ish. Our dog is a K9 dog and we simply cannot get rid of him (as in give away) or I'd do it. She ended up developing asthma from it as well. Since we've moved to a new home, we have the dog contained in our laundry area (with a tile floor) as we call it. She rarely even touches the dog as she'll break out in hives. I am glad now that there is extremely little dander about our new home now. My suggestion, would be to give your dog to someone who can give it a good home. If that is not possible, do your best to contain the dog in one area of the home where your child cannot access and the allergen has a much lesser chance of being spread throughout the home. No fun for the dog really, but your daughters health may demand it.
Most of all,...good luck. It's been a tough day for you with all of the revelations you've had. Keep your chin up!

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 6:56am
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[img]http://www.thesmilies.com/smilies/surprised/jaw-dropping.gif[/img]
So sorry you had this experience. I agree w/ pp- RUN to another allergist!

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 7:37am
cgroth's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Corvallis Mom:
[b]I agree... is this physician AAAI certified? If so, you should report this.
This kind of advice, given to someone who doesn't know better, is definitely malpractice.
Report him to your state medical board. He shouldn't be taking FA patients if this is how he sees things.
[/b]
My thoughts exactly.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 9:44am
abigailsmoma's picture
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I went to the AAAAI board and it says his special is Rhinitis, Sinusitis. I guess that explains him not knowing much on food allergies or which food was in what food group.
Thank you all for the support. I of course will not be going back to this doctor. We had taken her about 2 hours away to her first allergist and I thought with as many problems I have had we needed one closer.
He actullay asked me would I like to just put her in a bubble! I told him if that is what I have to do to protect my child I would. The more I think about the day the more steamed I got.
As for the dog and mold thank you. We will be getting the mold issue taken care of right away. The dog is an outdoor dog only. She is bigger then Abby so I usually tie her up when Abby is playing out side. It scares her when she comes running for force and jumps on her.
If anyone can tell me how to post a picture I will post one of reaction.
I am so thankful to have great understanding people like you to talk to.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 1:09pm
abigailsmoma's picture
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I have been researching this Dr. more. I had actually researced his dad instead of him. This Dr. is a Doctor of Osteopathic and Internal Medicine. What is that?

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 1:24pm
joeybeth's picture
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i believe it would mean he's a DO rather than an MD. i think the difference is that one is trained in standard medical school and the other trained in an osteopathic school of medicine. we have many DO's where we live. i'm not sure if one would be better than the other for pediatric allergies.

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 4:42pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
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It means he does not have any particular specialty in allergy or immunology, that's what it means.
He's an "internist" or a "general practitioner."

Posted on: Tue, 06/13/2006 - 10:53pm
saknjmom's picture
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I don't think i would be able to contain myself during an office visit like this. I would write him a letter along with material to support the fact that food allergies are on the rise and are very serious.
I would have to have my say to this dr. What if a newly diagnosed person goes to see him and that person is given this type of information? That could put a child at serious risk.

Posted on: Wed, 06/14/2006 - 5:24am
Christabelle's picture
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This is a new level of incompetence!
Write a letter to him expressing how shockingly bad and incompetent his advice is, and how dangerous it is.
Also, report him to whatever appropriate agency you can. This guy is scary.

Posted on: Wed, 06/14/2006 - 7:16am
cathlina's picture
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Report him to the state medical board before he kills someone with his incompetence.
Could he be on drugs? Or have a mental problem? He sounds pretty boastful..could be in the manic phase of bi-polar.

Posted on: Mon, 06/19/2006 - 1:35pm
abigailsmoma's picture
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I have thought about writing him a letter, but most people like him that are that full of themself it don't phase.
I have been so busy with my daughter this week. Since she had the skin prick test she has had problems of hives and itching. We also had the problem with the sunmaid raisins just a week ago. I am going to report the JERK to the medical board though. I also thought I would contact some places like FAAN and Epi Pen and let them know that he says you can't really die from an Anaphylactic reaction! Maybe they can send him so info. Any suggestions on what I do to report him to medical board?

Posted on: Mon, 06/19/2006 - 2:04pm
princesshinmighty's picture
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OMG I can't believe I just read that, but otoh I can. Some of these docs are NOT as educated as the piece of paper on their wall states they are.
As far as contacting the state board, I would first contact a mal-practice lawyer in your state. no wait, first, I would take your daughter to a new doctor to have the reactions treated that she's already having. Even if it means going back 2 hours away to the first doc that you used to go to -- go to someone who knows what they're doing, with a proven record. THEN have that doctor write up a statement of what they saw with the daughter. And also contact a lawyer to find out what they would suggest.
Most everything can be looked up online, as well as reports filed on-line, depending on your state.
Good luck!

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 12:35am
Gail W's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Corvallis Mom:
[b]It means he does not have any particular specialty in allergy or immunology, that's what it means.
He's an "internist" or a "general practitioner."[/b]
. . . in ADULT medicine, not pediatrics.
Our allergist is Board Certified in both "Pediatrics" and "Allergy & Immunology" which is ideal IMO. My DH is an internist, and he tells me that treating adults and children can be very different.

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 1:43am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b] . . . in ADULT medicine, not pediatrics.
Our allergist is Board Certified in both "Pediatrics" and "Allergy & Immunology" which is ideal IMO. My DH is an internist, and he tells me that treating adults and children can be very different. [/b]
and in addition, isn't a "DO" trained in *everything* an "MD" would be [i]but with additional training[/i] as well as a different [i]perspective[/i]? I'm not sure, but just wondering, and it's my general impression (having worked with a considerable number of them). But I could be wrong....

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 2:03am
MommaBear's picture
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[url="http://www.stronghealth.com/services/primarycare/domd.cfm"]http://www.stronghealth.com/services/primarycare/domd.cfm[/url]
[url="http://www.princetonreview.com/medical/research/articles/decide/DOissues.asp"]http://www.princetonreview.com/medical/research/articles/decide/DOissues.asp[/url]
General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. I do not guarantee the accuracy, currentness, applicability, or content of the links in this post. Individual Mileage May Vary.

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 3:57am
JenniferKSwan's picture
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In my experience, DO's are much more laid back when it comes to treating patients - prefer to take a wait and see approach rather than jumping on a runny nose with antibiotics. For me - this is the perfect doctor because I don't have any life threatening conditions that I know of (with the exception of my ana to ingested banana which I have been able to control easily enough.) Honestly, I wouldn't even mind a DO for my son when it comes to colds, ear infections, immunizations and such.
Now, having said all that - I would never take my son to see a DO regarding his allergies because it would be like asking most of my husband's family to treat his allergies - "It's not that big a deal."
My allergist did explain to me that the only true way to know if an allergy is a true allergy is to ingest it, in her office, and see if there is a reaction. However, in the case of ana possible reactions, ie PN and TN that this should never be done for several reasons. Number one being that it is extremely dangerous! The second reason, PN and TN may start out as mild reactions, but the more exposure you have, the more likely that the reaction will become worse. She told me that I am better off assuming the worst and going about my life thinking that the smallest exposure could be an issue.
Good luck in finding a better allergist or practitioner - I know how hard it can be!
------------------
Mommy to Aiden 1/26/05 PA,wheat,barley,soy,egg and others yet to be discovered DS#2 is due July 15, 2006 who we hope will be AF

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 6:18am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Exactly. I would actually be pretty happy with a DO as our primary care provider... IF that person understood [i]perfectly[/i] when they were out of their depth.
This would include the knee problems DH and I both suffer from, our entire family's atopy, and DH's family hx of diabetes. Although knowing all of those things could lead a DO to make very accurate assessments about specialist care. Just like our family practice MD does. He isn't an "expert" but that isn't what we see him for. We like all seeing the same physician for years on end-- he knows us. [i]Well.[/i] And this is critical to good care for chronic or emergent conditions. JMO.
But what I thought was wrong/unprofessional of this physician was to represent himself as an "allergist" when he is clearly not competent in that capacity.

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 7:30am
abigailsmoma's picture
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Joined: 11/30/2005 - 09:00

Thanks for the links and info on the doctors.
I feel so stupid that I didn't research this man before I went to him.
Abby has had a break out almost every day now since she had the skin test. She rarely ever broke out around dogs and know it is horrible. Why after the skin test is she breaking out worse? None of this make any sense to me.

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 8:32am
JenniferKSwan's picture
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Joined: 06/19/2006 - 09:00

Don't beat yourself up on not researching the doctor - we have all been there. Heck, I'm still there. You would think after nearly a year of my pediatrician making me feel like an idiot (he still doesn't believe DS allergies were part of his failure to thrive when we were breastfeeding - in fact, he isn't concerned about his allergies to begin with), you would think I would have found another doctor. However, DS is relatively healthy and I just find myself dreading his milestone check-ups - I mean to the point of not ever wanting to make them. Between DS being underweight (he eats like a horse, but has multiple food allergies and boundless energy)and wanting to delay further vax'ing until he is 2 (we had issues with each vax with eczema going out of control) - I dread seeing him because he does make me feel like the worst mother in the world. I'm working on finding a new ped, just trying to make sure I find the right match this time...preferably before DS#2 is born.
Regarding the dog, DS tested positive to dog as well. We went round and round because our dog was such a huge part of our life and at the time, was the only one who could make my son laugh. I couldn't decide which was crueler - the PA diagnosis or the allergy to the dog. (As I write this, DS is trying to convince the dog he is a horse so he can ride him!) Obviously we didn't get rid of the dog. We tried washing him on a weekly basis, keeping the licks to my DS to a minimum ( he will break out in welts after an excessive licking spree) and just doing our best to vacuum daily the common areas and keep the dog out of DS room (we are a little more lax now since DS is in a room with linoleum as opposed to carpet). I do notice during the pollen season, DS did have more reactions to the dog. Of course Radar seemed to have more allergic reactions himself. To help both of them, I kept Radar in as much as possible and vacuumed (yes, vacuumed him) after he went out before he made it into contact with DS. Actually vaccuuming Radar is something I do on a fairly regular basis - he enjoys it and I think it helps keep the fur and dander down.
I can't remember how long it has been since your daughter had her allergy test, but she may still be reacting. You may want to keep up with benadryl or check with your pediatrician. I seem to remember DS having issues for awhile after his skin test.
------------------
Mommy to Aiden 1/26/05 PA,wheat,barley,soy,egg and others yet to be discovered DS#2 is due July 15, 2006 who we hope will be AF

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2006 - 12:45pm
Lori Jo's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/17/2003 - 09:00

First...run quickly to a new doctor, as stated before. That guy sounds just horrible.
Second...as an MD, I have to weigh in on the DO/MD difference. I don't think there is a huge difference between the two ON AVERAGE. I have worked with, or been friends, with very talented, well trained DO's. These were all people who did residencies in everything from pediatric trauma surgery to family practice. I know some MD's who I wouldn't send my dog to. The biggest issue with the doctor your ds saw is whether he did an Allergy and Immuno residency, and is he board certified. Doctors do advertise as specialists because they take extra courses, have an extra interest, etc, but have no formalized, accredited (?sp) training. Is this always bad? No. We have a general practictioner around here (rural area) who does only derm. For most acne/warts/etc, that is just fine. For something as specialized as my dd's PA, we drive 3 hours to see a board certified pediatric allergist. Your state medical board should be able to tell you who is board certified, and in what.
Good luck and sorry you had to go thru all that.
------------------
Lori Jo,
Rose, 7-31-02, PA
Beatrice & Georgia, 8-14-99

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