Flying with epipen

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Hi there,

I'm planning a trip home to Canada (I'm in Switzerland) this summer and am wondering if anyone has had any hassle taking their epipen through the security checks? I think I will get a letter from the pediatrician but wanted to hear what you all had to say.

Thanks a lot.

Kelly Mom to peanut allergic Lara aged 2.5 yrs

On Feb 19, 2003

No trouble at all flying *out* of Canada . I had a letter from the allergist and the pediatrician, but no one was interested in even seeing it. As long as the epi is in its tube, and the name of the child on it, you should be ok.

On Feb 19, 2003

Hello

My kids flew within Canada as unaccompanied minors this Christmas carrying two epipens each without any problems.

I have also gone through security with a pump for ventolin nebulizers without problems (although that was before Sept 11). The security staff seemed to know what it was, though.

deb

On Feb 19, 2003

We just came back from Edmonton and we had no problem security didn't even check the epi-pens. The airline said that as long as you have the letter there shouldn't be a problem

On Feb 19, 2003

I have flown at least 6 times in the US since 9/11, and I have not had a problem. My hand bag was manually searched 1 time, and the security person noticed the epi-pen. I offered the Dr's letter, but she said that it was "OK", and let me pass through.

I dont think you should have a problem, just be sure to have a Dr's note just in case they need verification.

On Feb 20, 2003

Hee hee.. That reminds me of last year, when I flew to Indianapolis to attend a Starwars convention with my stormtrooper costume... They *had* to pick me for a handsearch too. The look on the guy's face when he saw the helmet in my bag! LOL. Thankfully the (totally fake and plastic) gun had been sent into the belly of the plane....

On Feb 20, 2003

Too funny Darth [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

I've never had a problem carrying my epi on planes in Canada. However, one stewardess pointed out that I should NOT wear the fannypack around my waist while flying. In the event of major turbulence (?) she felt it was possible to get accidentally injected. I now tie the fannypack to the bottom of the seat in front of me just to be safe.

The only thing I ever got questioned on while travelling was rather embarrassing. I was travelling with my son (about 2 then) and brought Tickle-Me-Elmo along (his favourite toy). I figured listening to that laugh the whole flight would iritate other passengers so I took the whole battery pack out and stuck it in my carry on baggage. As it went through the x-ray machine the guys were killing themselves laughing and pointing. Now, I think plastic wouldn't show up, but the wires and batteries would. Just imagine the shape [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img]

We no longer bring Elmo on planes.

On Feb 26, 2003

I have flown with DS for years, before and after 911. I have a letter from his Dr as well and he wears a MedicAlert tag. No problems. However you can get the airline to document the allergy in their records. I make sure the Rx label is on the tube as well as the box.

On Feb 26, 2003

Thanks everyone for your responses.

My daughter does wear the medic alert bracelet and I will get a letter from her doctor. We spoke to the airline about it and the guy had never heard of an epipen...sigh! Unfortunately they can't guarantee peanut-free meals on their flights to Canada so she will have to eat fruit and I will have to bring her meal. Sure hope they don't hassle me about that either.

Thanks again,

Kelly

On Feb 26, 2003

We had no problem this year, but last year they called the security supervisor over and virtually took the darned thing apart (despite MD's note).

If you want a sample note to give your MD, FAAN has one on their website ( [url="http://www.foodallergy.org"]www.foodallergy.org[/url] )that you can print out. It also has an addendum for inhalers.

Happy Flying,

Amy

On Feb 26, 2003

I recently flew from Boston to Orlando and back w/ mine. I had 4 epipens in my knapsack and my letters ready. They didn't even notice them and never asked anything about them. However, they literally tore my husbands bag apart to get an ink pen our. Made me a bit skeptical of the job airport security is doing.

On Feb 27, 2003

Hello, try to get a detailed letter from your doctor stating that the epi-pen must be carried on the child at all times and outlining consequences if it is not. I have been asked to show this letter by Customs and Security personnel both in the U. S. and Canada. Usually a supervisor is called, I show the letter and suggest that the supervisor telphone the doctor [her number and the hospital emergency numbersa re included by her in the letter]at my expense if more information is needed. I also carry the AAAIA directive about carrying epi-pens. You may not need the letter / documentation but we have needed it when travelling with our son.

On Feb 27, 2003

Well, I'm flying back to Montreal, from Orlando, so wish me luck!

Two epipens are flying with us [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Feb 27, 2003

Where can I get a copy of the aaaia directive also? I can't seem to find it on their website.

On Mar 1, 2003

Well, flying OUT of the US was a joke. The two epipens (in two separate bags, in case of loss) didn't trigger any raised eyebrows. The cell phone wasn't checked for functionality (they're supposed to do that since there are some guns out there disguised as non-working cell phones), in fact my purse wasn't opened at all - it had an epipen, some unknown whitish powder (add-water cereals for the baby), a PDA, a cell phone. A real joke.

On Mar 2, 2003

I just flew across the US via Southwest. They serve peanuts, so I contacted them to find out how to have a peanut free flight.

I needed a letter from my doctor. Actually, he wrote a note on a message form from our HMO, and included the information that I carry epipens.

No one even checked for them. I do make sure however, that I carry my epis with me in my carryon luggage.

By the way, I had to notify people who issue the boarding pass, and I make a point to notify the flight attendant that I am "the peanut person" and that I carry medication with me. They appreciate this knowledge.

I do hope we get to the point where all flights are peanut free.

About airport security, I was amazed at how well the xray machines work now. I got to see one in action. I actually got through the boarding process faster now than before. They were checking all electronic devices in both airports.

On Mar 3, 2003

Hi, Kelly!

We flew last summer from Frankfurt am Main, Germany, connected in London, then on to the US with American last August. Our doctor used the FAAN form letter, and I carried it with the EpiPens, but no one with security in asked for it (Frankfurt, London, Raleigh-Durham, and Chicago-O'Hare airports). Do be careful that the letter states that the Epi-Pen needs to be with the child at all times. Apparently, a letter stating it just needs to available gives the pilot the prerogative to insist that it be kept in the cockpit.

An idea for meals - if you haven't had the airline/travel agent flag your child's name as having a food allergy (which means it will be listed on the head flight attendant's notes on the passenger list), call the airline, ask for a customer service specialist, and have them to do that. Then, when you check in, remind them at boarding of the allergy, and ask to speak with the head flight attendant. We've found them to be very helpful. If they have ingredients listed on the food packages, they have always read them for us. Normally, we get those kids microwaveable meals (the Gerber ones in the baby-food section are the ones we're most comfortable with - but bring some salt!). The aircraft probably won't have a microwave, but First-class usually gets their food served on real oven-safe plates. The flight attendants have always found a spare dish to put the food in and heat for us.

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