fact or fiction... can you react on the first exposure?

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Is is possible to react to something on the first exposure? I've been told no, but my experience is different. The first time Allison had pb, she reacted. The first time Brianna got stung by bees, she had an anaphylatic reaction. Now I know, without a doubt, that she never got stung before (she was 2 when it happened). I know I was never stung while I was pregnant. So how does it happen? I suppose as far as the pb goes, it could be from when I was pregnant and ate some? If someone could explain this, I would love it hear it. Thanks!!!

Liz

On Aug 6, 2000

I've always heard you don't react to the first exposure either, but my son tested very positive for peanut allergy even though he's NEVER been exposed. Since I'm PA, we have always had a peanut free household and I didn't eat any while pregnant or breastfeeding (obviously). I read somewhere recently that they're investigating the possibility of certain allergies being hereditary. Of course, I can't remember where I read that now.

Rebekah

On Aug 7, 2000

Did your Dr. have any explaination for testing positive with no exposure?

On Aug 7, 2000

My son reacted after his first exposure. It wasn't serious, but he had a reaction. The second time was a little worse than the first. At that time we had him tested and sure enough he is allergic to peanuts.

On Aug 7, 2000

My son reacted to his first exposure to peanuts but we didn't know it was from an allergy then. We ended up in the hospital that night due to dehydration because he was vomiting so much, we had just eaten ice cream at DQ 30 minutes before the vomiting started. The saying, "you don't react with the first exposure," did hold true to his tree nut allergies though. He ate handfuls of cashews a couple of years ago and nothing happened and then went into anaphylactic shock with only 3 small pieces of them a few months ago. He tested 4+P to all of the above and pistachios and only ate pistachios once...will not eat them again to see if the saying is right for it too.

On Aug 7, 2000

My daughters first exposer was while I was pregnant with her and again when I was nursing her. This is the explaination that we were given when she actually injested her first bite of PB and had a reaction. Just like bee sting it is the second one that will get you but it can also be the amount of stings you get at one time.

------------------ Karalot

[This message has been edited by KarenT (edited August 07, 2000).]

On Aug 7, 2000

What I heard an Allergist say regarding why some people can react to a bee sting the first time they are stung is that there are molecules in nature that are very similar to each other, so the person might have been exposed to a molecule at some point that was so similar to the bee it was able to sensitize them and hence a reaction upon the fist bee sting.

On Aug 7, 2000

Ok went to the dr. today and this was one of the questions he did answer. He told me, yes he thinks and others} that it could happen by breastfeeding and when your preg. if the mother eats alot of peanuts and what ever. In my case I can see it happening to my 2nd son how tested for peanuts. I ate everything and anything w/peanut in, on it and so on. Valerie

On Aug 8, 2000

KarenT -- Just wondering, but how did you know your daughter had a reaction while you were pregnant with her? I wonder because I ate a lot of pnut butter when I was pregnant with my daughter and wondered if it was possible for her to react while in the womb. Thanks!

On Aug 8, 2000

Linda-Jo I don't think that is what KarenT was referring to but I know when I was pregnant with my second son, dairy allergic, whenever I would drink a glass of milk he would be constantly moving and kicking. I remember commenting to my husband that he must love it and now I know that is was probably bothering him.

On Aug 8, 2000

Chasie - wasn't sure what you meant by "yes your doctor could see it happening by being pregnant..." Do you mean that your son could be allergic b/c you ate peanut things while pregnant and nursing?? I have heard there have been alot of studies done on this but NOT conclusive! My friend ate tons of PB when she was pregnant (being that it is good for you) and her kids are NOT allergic. However, I do believe and my allergist said that if you are prone to allergies (they are hereditary..if the parents have one type of allergy a child is more prone to get a type of allergy) then yes, staying away from peanut butter would be a good thing. For me, b/c my daughter is PA, the statistics show that the chances of my second child having a food allergy (of some sort) are higher. The advice of my daughter's allergist was to NOT eat Peanut products during pregnany, during nursing and try to nurse as long as possible (also, introduce highly allergic foods later than normal). The weird thing is that I had a ton of milk during my pregnancy (my doctor said it is very good for you) and yet, my daughter is NOT allergic to milk/dairy. Anyhow, while I do believe that the studies are inconclusive re: what you eat during pregnancy...I will most definitely avoid PButter given that I already have one PA child....

On Aug 9, 2000

Just to clarify. I ate alot of PB and mixed nuts etc while I was pregnant with my daughter. (I also was sick for 9 months) This ment that she had been exposed to the protein before she was born. If I had not had any nuts while pregnant with her she might not have reacted until the second time she had nuts. That is how it has been explained to me.

------------------ Karalot

On Aug 9, 2000

Hi I found this reference interesting because peanut and tree nut allergies are inherited in my family. I was advised before attempting to become pregnant to avoid all exposure and not to expose any children until after allergy testing. My son was not exposed, ever, but is allergic.

Here is the information: Peanut Allergy May Have Genetic Link--American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Press Release: July 17, 2000 MILWAUKEE - Genetics play a significant role in peanut allergy say a group of researchers in the July Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the peer-reviewed, scientific journal of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI). Lead researcher Scott Sicherer, M.D. and colleagues from Virginia and Belgium performed a twin study to determine if genetic factors influence peanut allergy by comparing the incidence of peanut allergy among identical and fraternal twins. Twin studies are often used to provide information on the relative contribution of genetic factors to a disease when compared with environmental factors. Previous twin studies have shown high rates of heritability of allergic diseases including asthma, atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis. Studies about the genetics of peanut allergy have been limited to a British study that compared the incidence of peanut allergy among siblings with the incidence in the general population. Although the British study showed that peanut allergy had a genetic component, environmental factors may have biased the results. Fifty-eight pairs of twins (14 identical and 44 fraternal) were recruited for this study with at least one member of each pair having a convincing history of peanut allergy. Seventy individuals had a history of peanut allergy. In 64% of the identical twin pairs, both twins were allergic to peanuts, whereas in the fraternal twin pairs, both twins had peanut allergy 7% of the time. Using this data and a model that considered genetic and environmental factors, researchers calculated a heritability rate of 82% to 87% for peanut allergy. When genetic factors were not considered, the rate dropped to 18.99%, reflecting the importance of the genetic component of peanut allergy. The authors say further studies are needed to closely examine the role of genetices in allergies caused by peanuts and other foods. It is estimated that up to 8% of children and 2% of adults in the United States are affected by food allergy. Peanuts are one of the most common foods that trigger an allergic reaction, with about three million Americans at risk for reacting to peanuts. An allergic reaction occurs when the immune system overreacts to an ordinarily harmless food. Common symptoms of food allergy can include hives, eczema, asthma and gastrointestinal symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping. The most severe reaction is anaphylaxis, a systemic reaction that can sometimes be fatal. The AAAAI is the largest professional medical specialty organization in the United States representing allergists, asthma specialists, clinical immunologists, allied health professionals and others with a special interest in the research and treatment of allergic disease.

On Aug 9, 2000

Hey, our son's dr. did say to me what Karen T. said but added that, that eating peanuts could have made something click(?) in his body to have this allergy. On my side and my husband side the only allergy there is dust mites MIL}. So, I really don't know to beleive this or not. But I do not thing I caused him to have this. I do think maybe if I didn't eat as much, his 1st reaction would not be as bad. { he hasn't had one yet.} Valerie.{still learning all this good stuff} [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Aug 10, 2000

Brimor, No, my doctor offered no speculation as to how my son's first exposure (the skin test in her office) had caused a reaction. I have decided that he probably inherited the specific allergy from me even though I've been told specific allergies are not inherited, only the tendency to be allergic. I have also suspected that my son's "first exposure" could have been from cross contamination or airborne, though I don't really think that's what caused it. So far, my son has almost all the exact same allergies as I have.

Rebekah

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