Emergency food for evacuation/disaster

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I've been wondering since listening to the news about Hurricane Katrina - then reading Peg's post that her pet tarantula is building an 'earthquake web'.....

Does anyone know what sort of food is provided by emergency Red Cross shelters and if there are provisions for food allergies? Do PA.com members keep an stash of emergency food on hand just-in-case?

I have visions of being in a food line at a Red Cross shelter and finding out that dinner is a PB sandwich and a granola bar...

Not that I anticipate a disaster.... Just wondering. .

On Aug 29, 2005

Our stash is small but enough if we needed it. Allerenergy bars, canned fruits, pastas with the premade sauce packet, fruit bars, cereal bars, white and chocolate milk that doesn't require refrigeration, juice boxes, water, crackers, chips, oatmeal and items that just need boiled water. I would think Red Cross would have fresh fruit, veges, water, and basic food staples. I would want to be prepared with some things just in case.

Take Care toomanynuts

On Aug 29, 2005

I am one of those people that has an emergency food container in 2 different parts of the city that we live in. Yes, I am paranoid but I do live in Florida and you know about the hurricanes. Believe it or not I also worry about terrorist attacks. I keep these all year long and just take out the items when they come close to expiration. There are a few good threads on this from last year,if you can find them. A few items that I have added this year are wellshirefarms turkey and pepporoni sticks since you don't have to refrigerate until they are opened. They are tasty and peanut/nut free facility as well as gluten free. We also have corn cakes (australian brand from health food store) fruit sticks raisins lots of Frito Lay items missroben.com mixes safe flours (we have to be gluten and rice free too for one of my kids) pasta (corn, quinoa and regular) apple sauce Motts brand Dole fruit canned fruit juice boxes Organic Valley dried milk safe candy enjoylifefoods.com cookies and cereal and many more items. enjoylifefoods bread glutino corn bread (egg free) soy nut butter or pea butter justtomatos.com dried fruit Contadina tomato sauce (no spices) tea bags sugar paper goods and utencils All items are completely safe with no (as usual) may contains. I do know that some of our shelters here did serve peanut butter but I don't know about now. I totally stress about the food if there was a hurricane and feel much better having my supplies in stock all year long. We also have an underground generator that keeps that house going if electric goes out and a few small grills to cook if we can't use a stove. I also stock up on hot dogs and lunch meat (applegate farms or Boars head) before a storm because at least we can keep those in ice for awhile and they are pre-cooked. Hope this helps.

On Aug 29, 2005

Here in MN we don't really evacuate . . .we're a lot more likely to be stuck where we are! However, having a safe stash of food seems to be common sense to me. Earthquake web???

------------------ For more thoughts: [url="http://ralarson.blogspot.com"]Ruth's blog[/url]

On Aug 31, 2005

Watching the news on Katrina is sobering. Three days after the disaster and only now are people starting to get some help.

It really makes me realize the importance of having a minimum 3-day supply of food and water on hand. Granted - most people probably lost any emergency food and water they had, but not all disasters are floods.

On Aug 31, 2005

Adele, I'm glad you posted this question. I was concerned after seeing a report from Gulfport where the reporter interviewed a couple. When asked about the conditions in the shelter, the couple said the food was a peanut butter sandwich.

This has now given me the kick I need to create a shelter in place box for DD. I have a small (shoe box size) box of safe food at day care but I've not really addressed shelter in place issues with day care.

I'm in the DC area. We really don't have to evacuate for weather reasons but would be more likely to have to shelter in place for a terrorist attack.

On Aug 31, 2005

DO you think we need to start a letter writing campaign to FEMA. I am assuming that they give out tons of PB during an emergency...what a scary thought.

On Aug 31, 2005

This is one of my concerns about PA families being stuck at shelters here in Houston--and why I wanted to help any who have made their way here--or at least one family. I thought at the very least that I could buy several jars of Soybutter tomorrow and take them to the Astrodome where folks are being taken to--and hope there aren't severe Soy allergies, too. It's not too far from my office. I don't have any unopened jars of sunbutter or peabutter, but if I knew of PA families in my area longterm, I'd be happy to order several jars for them.

I may call the Red Cross here tomorrow. The Houston Red Cross is apparantly THE hub for the rescue efforts for the gulf states, and I may try to tell someone about peanut allergy. With no electricity, I'm sure PB is being widely used. And I believe FEMA's role is not to hand out this stuff but to dole out funds and such.

[This message has been edited by McCobbre (edited August 31, 2005).]

[This message has been edited by McCobbre (edited August 31, 2005).]

On Aug 31, 2005

I logged on for just this discussion!

I was watching Fox News and the ticker across the bottom read something about an allergic reaction and trouble finding food during the crisis. I think someone died. Has anyone heard??? I keep watching the ticker, but I think they've changed it now.

We live in FL. During the hurricane's last year the shelter's served nothing but PB&J.

What can FEMA do if we write them? Most of the time the electricity is out, even at the shelters. So peanut butter is shelf stable. Could they serve soy-nut butter? Maybe - but what about the people allergic to soy?

No, I could never do a shelter. We evacuate. Period. Last year we spent a week at Studio's Plus in Atlanta. We had our own kitchen and never had to worry. The cost per night was onlt $60 too.

Carolyn

On Aug 31, 2005

My DH is a bit of a survivalist (the *good* kind, which is to say he has more food and water than ammunition!) so we keep on hand enough water for I think two weeks (maybe just one?) and non-perishable food for roughly the same time. He also keeps several fanny packs with enough calories and nutrition (you can't really call it food) for each person for between three and seven days (same number of calories, but in worst-case-scenario terms you could survive on very few calories per day) in case something happens where we need to drop everything and go--he tends to think in terms of bioterrorism, I think in terms of huge trees falling on our house. As much as I made fun of it at the time, this "bug out bag" (his term) makes a lot of sense, particularly in disaster-prone areas of the country when you have special food needs.

I'd imagine that the Red Cross would have alternatives for someone with food allergies, but I'd think the cramped living conditions in a shelter would make it nearly impossible to avoid peanuts if they are serving PBJ. Better to evacuate yourself whenever possible.

Sarah

On Aug 31, 2005

McCobbre, I really wish I could come down to Houston to help out. I am feeling so helpless [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] and have the urge to fly down to help.

I'm feeling so proud of the magnitude of care people have in this country!

Just saw this link...I'm pretty positive it's like this all over the US, too.

[url="http://www.dailyherald.com/story.asp?id=89025"]http://www.dailyherald.com/story.asp?id=89025[/url]

[This message has been edited by e-mom (edited August 31, 2005).]

On Sep 1, 2005

Well, after watching local news last night, I'm not very hopeful about getting into the Astrodome. Other people who have brought big barbeque pits to feed family members who are waiting to see if their family arrive (and these are folks from LA who are hoping that their family survived and are coming by bus from the Superdome) have been told to go away. My best bet is to contact the Red Cross. And because I have professional contacts there, that's where I'll start. I did jot down the numbers of shelters that were flashing across the screen last night. There were dozens and dozens.

This is all so bad. My heart is aching. People are taking people in down here. School systems are being opened up for kids from Louisiana. Businesses are trying to see where they can provide short-term jobs. This is going to be so hard on everyone.

On Sep 1, 2005

I just saw that Whole Foods itself is taking donations in the link above. I'll call them--either here in Houston or in Austin. That's where I was going to go to buy about a case of soybutter (I'd buy sunbutter, but you can't just buy it at the store). I think I'll talk to them about PA and ask them to donate cases of soybutter directly. They may be able to distribute them more easily, although, mail is not going into the affected zip codes, of course.

On Sep 1, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by ralarson: [b] Earthquake web???

[/b]

Peg has a tarantula which she posted about in the Off Topic Forum. He climbs to the top of his cage (and I think builds a web?) shortly before an earthquake hits.

*********

Years ago my son was involved in an organization for young people - late teens/early 20's - and one of the things they did was trips. His group did a canoe trip. I spoke to the man organizing, and they brought along some kind of tablets that can be added to water to make it drinkable. Does anyone know anything about them? Does anyone keep them with emergency supplies?

On Sep 1, 2005

You can get all kinds of water purification stuff at camping stores. We have a small filtration/purification thingummy. The tablets you mention are iodine tablets--not a bad thing to have in emergency supplies, and they're cheap--usually about $5 for a bottle of 50 tablets.

[url="http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?categoryId=253&catalogId=40000000226&storeId=226"]http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores...226&storeId=226[/url]

Sarah

On Sep 1, 2005

Regarding PA concerns for food supplied by federal relief: the military MRE's (meals ready to eat) that are being supplied to disaster area victims are typically full of peanut butter & peanut products.

As to my own household supply of emergency food, I admit I have become quite lax here in far-west Texas. Going to fix that this week. When we lived in coastal South Carolina & eastern North Carolina (for nearly 15 years total) we had ample emergency supplies -- kept five 5-gallon Culligan water jugs at all times, dry milk, canned goods, camp kitchen cooking gear in order, lots of cooking fuel, batteries, lanterns, radio, DIAPERS, etc. Had a generator with plenty of fuel to keep freezer & refrig going as well as run a fan or two. We had a printed checklist called "HURRICANE PREPARATIONS" and used it regularly. I've lost count now, but think I stayed through 15+ storms of varying size, to include the horrible floods in NC in 1999 and Hugo in Charleston. (We had no kids in 1989 when Hugo came -- DH was deployed, so I was alone -- I know we would have evacuated for Hugo if I'd had kids then.)

The ONE thing everyone should have is an ample supply of water. Our water supply in this nation is so vulnerable in many ways.

And I think we can take a lesson from the dire situation in New Orleans as to the amount of time it is taking for help to arrive -- we all must be prepared to help ourselves for many days and even do what we can to have extra to help those who couldn't or woundn't prepare.

As always, with each experience, we all learn.

Keeping the prayers going, EB

[This message has been edited by ajas_folks (edited September 01, 2005).]

On Sep 1, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by tcperrine: [b]I logged on for just this discussion!

I was watching Fox News and the ticker across the bottom read something about an allergic reaction and trouble finding food during the crisis. I think someone died. Has anyone heard??? I keep watching the ticker, but I think they've changed it now.

We live in FL. During the hurricane's last year the shelter's served nothing but PB&J.

What can FEMA do if we write them? Most of the time the electricity is out, even at the shelters. So peanut butter is shelf stable. Could they serve soy-nut butter? Maybe - but what about the people allergic to soy?

No, I could never do a shelter. We evacuate. Period. Last year we spent a week at Studio's Plus in Atlanta. We had our own kitchen and never had to worry. The cost per night was onlt $60 too.

Carolyn[/b]

tcperrine Have you heard anything else on this?

This will be the start of a new area we will need to adress.

------------------ Love this site Synthia

On Sep 1, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by synthia: [b] tcperrine Have you heard anything else on this?

This will be the start of a new area we will need to adress.

[/b]

Nope. I googled last night and never found a thing. I'll try again. Can't believe it never came across the ticker again!

Carolyn

On Sep 1, 2005

Carolyn, Last night I was watching FOX and read something regarding allergic reactions on the ticker tape along the bottom but it was regarding genetically tinkered food - and how scientists have decided it will not cause allergic reactions any more than regular food. Perhaps you caught the tail end of this?

On Sep 1, 2005

Hey guys, I keep a container of safe foods for Aidan & after seeing first hand what's in the kitchen of a shelter I will always have one. Its not just a case of peanuts, but by products also. & he's also allergic to other stuff too.

Now this shelter in New Iberia is American Red Cross, however all the stuff we have like blankets, toys, baby food, formula, diapers, food, hygeine products are donated by the public. So I don't know how they could regulate pa or any other food allergy.

Seeing all this stuff happen scares me so much that I know that Aidan would be at such a high risk due to his asthma. Count in his food allergies & I just about jump out my skin thinking about this.

On Sep 2, 2005

More on those iodine tablets: DH and I were talking about this last night (or specifically the lack of drinking water in N.O.) and I asked why they didn't get cases of iodine tablets down there--it's not as if they lack water in New Orleans, but you can't drink it. He says the tablets don't kill anything that has sporated (his word--I don't know if he made it up) so the water wouldn't be safe from things like cryptosporidium, which can often be fatal. So if you're looking for something to add to an emergency kit to help make water safe, it's better to go with a good filtering system.

Sarah

On Sep 2, 2005

toomanynuts, How do you like the allerenergy bars? Do they crumble easily? Do you have any idea how long they last in storage? Thanks, Adele

On Sep 2, 2005

McCobbre -- if you have any luck at all with your Red Cross contacts, please let me know so we can send AllerEnerngy bars directly to you/your contacts.

If anyone knows of support group contacts within the region, please let us know so we may send AllerEnergy product for distribution to displaced food allergic refugees.

On Sep 2, 2005

Sarah, thank you and your dh for the information.

I know last night Fema was talking about *water drops* which I assume are the same type of thing. However, I'm assuming they will be used in fresh rain water, since it has been raining in some areas.

On Sep 2, 2005

Adele,

Hi! We haven't tried the bars yet. They are in the cupboard. They don't have an expiration date it just says restock to maintain freshness. They definately won't crumble they are a softer/chewer type bar.

Hope that helps. toomanynuts

On Sep 2, 2005

thanks toomanynuts! I'll order a box. I'm trying to find food to carry with me when I travel, just in case. Good to know it won't crumble. Many thanks, Adele

On Sep 3, 2005

SpHiJr,

Rather than the Red Cross, the Houston Food Bank is getting food to the smaller shelters (and by smaller, I mean not the Astrodome, not Reliant Stadium and not the Convention Center). You could mail them there--would anything melt in them there? We're having cooler temps these days (in low 90's), but things still melt.

Here's the address: The Houston Food Bank The Herzstein Center 3811 Eastex Freeway Houston, Texas 77026 (713) 223-3700

I pass it on my way to work, and it's my drop off place for Soybutter (one of them anyway).

Well, most of us aren't going to like what I'm about to write, but here it is. I've fretted about the PB situation for days, but I'm just not anymore. I'm donating soybutter. But there's just so much more to this thing.

A friend who is a firefighter and was at the Astrodome for about 16 hours Thursday told DH the conditions that people arrived from New Orleans in. There were people who died getting here on the buses. And many on the buses where covered in filth--and I don't think I have to spell out what kind here, but think about the worst possible situation. I'd heard about the absolute squalid conditions at the Superdome in New Orleans, but I don't think I could have ever come up with the details on my own like this. Never in a million years. People were sent to the showers before finding cots in the Astrodome. Images of Aushwitz came to my mind . . . people being transported in filth, taken to showers. But the outcome was different here.

My friend helped one woman who traveled all the way from New O. with a broken hip, and she couldn't get off the bus. And because of washed out bridges and roads, the trip from New O. to Houston took much longer than usual.

As far as "Dome City" as it's now called is concerned, I think I'm just not as worried as I was about PB. At least for the first few days, the meals were the same: cold cereal for breakfast (okay I know what you're thinking--but there is going to be something safe), DH couldn't remember what it was for lunch, and spaghetti for dinner. It doesn't make sense to have to spread PB on 11,000 pieces of bread. It makes sense to serve something that you can cook in gigantic pots and dish out.

What I'm worried about are the smaller shelters dotting the city and surrounding areas. And that's where my soybutter is going. Soybutter with "for peanutbutter allergic people only" written on the top in Sharpie with an instruction note and a packet of disposable plastic knives rubber banded to each jar.

So if y'all want to help PA kids, do the same. Send sun and pea butter and soybutter to the Houston Food Bank in a box clearly marked that it contains food. I've tried to include the chocolate kind of soybutter, because it's the only soybutter DS can stomach--me, too, once I tasted the crunchy sunbutter.

I don't know what it's like in the rest of the country. I know what it's like when there's a horrible disaster in another part of the country (save 9/11), and it's much easier to be in my part. But it's absolutely awful here.

I heard that something like 75,000 hurricane evacuees are now in the Houston area

On Sep 3, 2005

I just had to chime in again after rereading this thread. There is just not a lot of drinkable water there--or water that can be made drinkable. There are bodies, feces, dead animals, and who knows what else floating in the water in New O. The drinking water supply has been compromised. There were many reasons for total evacuaction, but the prevention of the spread of disease was pretty top. There's no hope to be offered by iodine tablets here.

The only hope PA parents have is to evacuate when recommdended with enough food and gas to get you as far north as you need to be. In my case, it will be Dallas.

On Sep 4, 2005

McCobbre, your post brought tears to my eyes. Thanks to you for what you are doing but also thanks to Texas for doing so much for these poor people.

On Sep 4, 2005

I think the problem is that sometimes, despite our best efforts, emergencies may occur where evacuation is not possible. A lot of the people in NO, for example, would have been fine not evacuating... but the levee broke suddenly and the flooding was swift. The situation went from under control to disatrous in minutes. It is possible that emergency food/water supplies would be contaminated or destroyed in some circumsstances.

I think those of us dealing with allergies and other special needs should be extra certain to have those supplies and evacuate early when possible. I have gotten lax on it myself... and never really thought about what would happen if we ever ended up in a shelter!

And yes- in other parts of the country it DOES seem like a serious situation. It is a majority of the news, even here in PA. People are taking up donations, sending supplies, volunteering to help in many ways.

At first, it sounded like just another hurricane and I think there was confusions as to why so many people were stranded. I always thought the great thing about hurricanes was that you get enough warning to evacuate. It really put things into perspective, though, when they said that the devastated area is larger than PA. PA is the 6th largest state in the US. I can't imagine my entire state destroyed by a storm.

And people are outraged that Americans had to wait so long for help. It is scarey to know how unprepared our country is.

Tara P

On Sep 6, 2005

[quote]Originally posted by McCobbre: [B]SpHiJr,

Rather than the Red Cross, the Houston Food Bank is getting food to the smaller shelters (and by smaller, I mean not the Astrodome, not Reliant Stadium and not the Convention Center). You could mail them there--would anything melt in them there? We're having cooler temps these days (in low 90's), but things still melt.

Here's the address: The Houston Food Bank The Herzstein Center 3811 Eastex Freeway Houston, Texas 77026 (713) 223-3700

I pass it on my way to work, and it's my drop off place for Soybutter (one of them anyway). ***************************************

This is the thread I've been looking for. I have a PA daughter at home and have 6 unopened jars of pea-butter I could send down. I've been worried about those people with food allergies, having 3 children and myself with such afflictions. Thanks for posting the address to the Houston Food Bank, and thanks for your informative post. I have to say that I feel very isolated up here in Northern Ohio. We are in a rural area with no cable access and our local stations are not keeping us informed of the terrible conditions that the evacuee's are enduring. Karen

[This message has been edited by ksf123 (edited September 06, 2005).]

[This message has been edited by ksf123 (edited September 06, 2005).]

On Sep 6, 2005

Was at the Veteran's Coliseum in Phx two nites ago and just saw your question. Will ask if I go back!!

Quote:

Originally posted by Adele: [b]I've been wondering since listening to the news about Hurricane Katrina - then reading Peg's post that her pet tarantula is building an 'earthquake web'.....

Does anyone know what sort of food is provided by emergency Red Cross shelters and if there are provisions for food allergies? Do PA.com members keep an stash of emergency food on hand just-in-case?

I have visions of being in a food line at a Red Cross shelter and finding out that dinner is a PB sandwich and a granola bar...

Not that I anticipate a disaster.... Just wondering. .[/b]

On Sep 6, 2005

Quote:

[B}This is the thread I've been looking for. I have a PA daughter at home and have 6 unopened jars of pea-butter I could send down. I've been worried about those people with food allergies, having 3 children and myself with such afflictions. Thanks for posting the address to the Houston Food Bank, and thanks for your informative post. I have to say that I feel very isolated up here in Northern Ohio. We are in a rural area with no cable access and our local stations are not keeping us informed of the terrible conditions that the evacuee's are enduring. Karen [/B]

A couple of things: I'd mark on the lids with Sharpie that it's for peanut allergic people.

I know the North Texas Food Bank is providing food to evacuees in Dallas who are staying at Reunion Arena (Dallas was founded as La Reunion, a utopian community. Perhaps this will help the city get back to those roots.). You could google them, too. A greater number of evacuees are in Houston, but there are needs in Dallas, Austin, San Antonio in Texas. I saw a map tonight of states taking in refugees, and Texas was top on the list, then the hurricane-stricken states, and then Arkansas. So the need is all around--I didn't mean to focus folks on Houston only.

As far as getting more information, if I've determined your correct county, your local NPR station is: WOSV-FM: 91.7 There's also a signal at AM 820. And you can go to NPR.org and listen to some incredible stories that have aired over the last few days.

I read my local newspaper, try to read the online NYTimes, but I pretty much get my news from NPR. They've been doing a fantastic job as usual painting pictures with their stories. It's in depth stuff that you won't find anywhere else.

Okay--NPR promotion is now over. I'm a self-confessed NPR junkie (and former NPR station employee before moving to my current city). But I was an NPR junkie long before working at the station.

On Sep 6, 2005

Thanks Lebovitz! I would appreciate it if you could check. Are you volunteering at the Veteran's Coliseum?

McCobbre - me too....an NPR junkie. It's been exceptionally good the last few evenings.

On Sep 7, 2005

I just received a box of Allerenergy bars that I ordered. I've heard from someone that liked them and someone else hated them....

I ordered the variety box and tried one of the choc chip bars. It actually wasn't bad. It looks a little like bird seed but tastes better than I expected. They'll serve their purpose....an emergency stash of food for my suitcase when I travel.

On Sep 8, 2005

A good friend of mine who has food allergies just finished the Red Cross Disaster Relief training, and she spent time with Katrina evacuees who were moved to her area. She said that there are special meals being distributed to evacuees with food allergies and texture issues.

------------------ Cheryl, mom to Jason (8 MFA including peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish and egg),Joey (6 NKA) and Allison (2ish milk allergy, and a few suspected fruit allergies)

On Sep 9, 2005

I knew I liked you Adele!

On Sep 9, 2005

I have e-mailed Senator Harkin of Iowa and asked him to find out if FEMA does have ready meals for those with allergies that are peanut, egg, gluten free...etc.

If not, I have asked him to work on getting it included in the plans.

One thing I have learned from Hurricane Katrina is to keep a natural disaster kit at home. I am starting to work on one.

On Sep 19, 2005

Re-raising for Rita.

And no--I'm not referring to reraising my glass for another margarita, although I'd rather be.

Hurricane Rita may be heading toward Houston--or somewhere else on the Gulf Coast this weekend.

I thought others might find it useful.

It looks like this one won't be very large (they're forecasting a Cat 3 only), but this may be our first hurricane, and so I came to this thread to get some ideas on what to do to get prepared and to stock up on. It won't hurt to at least stock up on a few things. If things get too rough, we'll always head northward to Dallas, where I really consider home.

On Sep 20, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by McCobbre: [b]a Cat 3 only[/b]

Don't dis a hurricane. ;-) When Isabel came through our area two years ago, it was a measly tropical storm by the time it hit us, but that little tropical storm was enough to nearly destroy our house (if the tree hit a few feet to the right and we would have been toast), flood the downtown, swamp the entire area on the water east of the city, etc. I don't even like to think what a category 3 storm would be like.

Good luck, and stay safe!

Sarah

On Sep 20, 2005

Recommended Supplies to Include in a Basic Kit:

Water, one gallon of water per person per day, for drinking and sanitation

Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food

Battery-powered radio and extra batteries

Flashlight and extra batteries

First Aid kit

Whistle to signal for help

Dust mask or cotton t-shirt, to help filter the air

Moist towelettes for sanitation

Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities

Can opener for food (if kit contains canned food)

Plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place

Unique family needs, such as daily prescription medications, infant formula or diapers, and important family documents

Garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation

On Sep 21, 2005

Thanks guys. DS is actually in Fort Worth now (north of us), next to Dallas, for a meeting and will be fighting traffic to come back home today. For now we're so far away from the coast that we're not planning on evacuating, but it is forecasting to be a Cat 4 now. Its winds are currently at 120 mph. My worry is that we have many, many trees around us, and my plan was to go to Dallas. I actually am supposed to be on a plane to San Diego Sunday morning for a business trip, but who knows???

There's no water to be had here really--at least in Houston proper, where I could go on my lunch hour, but I picked up soybutter and pretzels packets at Whole Foods (we like those). I found myself making unwise irrational decisions. I called DS and told him to just gave him a list of what to buy while he was in Fort Worth before coming back down here.

I don't want to fight my way through the grocery store--I want to spend my time in line tonight at CVS getting another EpiPen or two for DS and his Palgic and perhaps another inhaler.

As bad as having a hurricane is, Galveston has handled this very well and has a mandatory evacutation and has provided buses that will take pets. Several school districts have closed for the rest of the week, and businesses have, too, so people can evacuate. In my opinion, economically it's better that it's hitting here than further south on the Texas coast.

Well, pray or think, or do whatever you do.

On Sep 21, 2005

Our family will be praying for you and everyone in the area. It is amazing how quickly it got to a 4. Praying for you!

toomanynuts

By Player11753 on Dec 23, 2014

Motts / Dr Pepper / Snapple fails to list allergens present in their production facilities on their labels. Motts also fails to list allergens present in their production facilities on their website. When I contacted customer "service", all I received was an apparent attempt to get my personal information:

December 19, 2014 Dear

Thank you for your email about Mott's Applesauce. We would like to obtain additional information in order to best answer your inquiry. You can call us at 800-696-5891, Monday through Friday, 8AM-7PM CT.

Thank you!

Sincerely,

Bethany Consumer Relations

There is no information from individual customers that is even remotely needed to disclose allergens. The allergens are present or not, regardless of what individual customer is contacting you!!!

Motts, please disclose allergens PRESENT IN YOUR FACILITIES and put the information ON THE LABEL. Please don't torture your customers by withholding the info from your labels and expecting them to take their valuable time to play detective to get this. PEOPLE CAN DIE from exposure to these allergens, even when "state of the art" cleaning methods are used. Let customers make their own decisions about what risks to take with their lives and THEIR CHILDREN'S LIVES.

By Player11753 on Dec 23, 2014

Please join in urging Motts / Snapple / Dr Pepper to properly label ALL their products with the common allergens labeled in their facilities by clicking on the link below.

http://www.econsumeraffairs.com/am_bev/ContactUsFollowUp.htm?F1=&F3=012037441A

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