20 posts / 0 new
Last post
Posted on: Tue, 07/27/2004 - 5:19am
lalow's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/24/2004 - 09:00

If I did not ever let my oldest eat anything his brother cant have he would have a pretty limited diet. Ben cant eat anything with milk, soy, or nuts and for a while egg. I try at home to have mostly foods we can all eat or atleast adapt for Ben so he is eating pretty close to the same things as us if not the same. It is when we go out or to other peoples houses I have more difficulty. I dont always have a "safe" as good as snack in my purse and to a 19 month old it doesnt matter if it is as good it isnt the same. I am sure it will get better as he gets older. I agree with you Rebekah. My husband always reminds the kids "fair does not mean equal".. I am sure that means alot to a 2 1/2 year old and a 19 month old [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I just need to find a comfortable place with all of this... A consistent approach.
------------------
Lalow
James 2yrs NKA
Ben 17 months PA,MA,possible EA, and SA

Posted on: Tue, 07/27/2004 - 5:40am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

We're in the same boat... relatively speaking...
Sara more than likely has had <2> PB products in her life -- Never in utero, no BF'ing (milk based formula), and never in the house, kwim?
However, I can think of 2 times,s he has had PB crackers and fudge with nuts in them... Neither time did she have a reaction...
Ann's 'gut' reaction is that Sara is NOT PA. But we treat her as she is... We tell her she more than likely is NOT PA, but C and DW are, so... Shes fine and dandy with that...
Though, she a worry wart, and when she sees and unknown cake she asks if it has peanuts (asks us), or if we're not there, she more than likely will NOT eat it... We check ahead of time, and tell her its free of peanuts, so its ok for her to eat it...
Ann doesnt want to turn Sara into a fruitcake (pardon the verbage -- can't think of the word I want) thinking nuts will kill her, kwim? Just be aware of what you're eating...
So more than likely, shes been sensitized (and I dont believe in that theory - see Caitlin and nuts), so therefore would test + if she truly IS +. Next appt at BCH, we'll ask the allergist what we should do, but it our decision, anyhow... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Jason

Posted on: Tue, 07/27/2004 - 5:47am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

It is a rare day that I would buy something for the family that Ryan couldn't eat. 99% of the time everything is safe (other 1% is not a may contain, but could be a new company or something like that), although 100% of the time there are no may contains. We do not eat them in the home, nor do we eat them when out as a family.
The kids, when in school, always eat a lunch packed from home with no may contains, but for parties at school my non-pa kids can eat anything they want. However, they know that anything with peanuts should be eaten before lunch and their hands and lips must be thoroughly washed with soap and water. They are not to eat PB products within two or three hours before coming home from school.
Last time one of my kids ate a "may contain" product in front of my son was after her softball game. The coach took the team out for ice cream. Since the entire family went to the ice cream stand, my daughter ate the vanilla soft-serve cone bought for her by the coach. The rest of us five ate nothing, even though it was offered by the coach. In these cases, if my son is along, only the team member is treated and the rest of the family abstains for the sake of my son. We don't want him to feel left out. It works out well this way.
And we always carry plenty of wipes for those hands after eating!
** Just editing to add that in the case of the ice cream excursion, I always expect this to happen and have something like Oreos or another treat for the five abstainers. If I really planned well I would have put 5 PhillySwirlwiches in an ice chest for the rest of us to eat.
[This message has been edited by ryan's mom (edited July 27, 2004).]

Posted on: Tue, 07/27/2004 - 11:16am
Kim M's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/09/2001 - 09:00

We treat our non-PA daughter just as Cindy and Miriam do: as if she were PA. But that's just because there is nothing in our house that is unsafe for PA daughter, so we all eat as if we were PA. I don't eat may-contains when I am without kids. I think my husband sometimes eats unsafe food when he is at work, but since I talked to him about kissing and residue, I think he has cut way back on that.
Miriam, I am in the same spot as you in wondering whether we should have our younger daughter tested. I sometimes will say she's not allergic, and DH says, "How do we know?" I even went so far as to decide not to send her to a new school that was supposedly peanut free, but I found they didn't enforce it for birthday treats and special occasions. The story is this:
Both girls have been attending a peanut free school that we have been very happy with. Oldest DD just finished kindergarten, which is as high as the school goes, so she will be starting first grade at a private school, also peanut free. I was debating whether to switch youngest DD to the preschool branch of the same school, which is within walking distance of our home and would vastly simplify my life. Then one morning we spent a couple hours visiting to get DD accustomed to the school, and I noticed some store bakery cupcakes on the shelf, and they had a nut warning. I mentioned it to the director, and was told that they were for a birthday, and they kept separate treats for the allergic children. She acted as though it would be [i]such[/i] a burden on the parents to ask them to actually make sure that a treat was safe. I know that this is not the case, as the parents at our current school have been fabulous at making sure that they bring treats that all the children can eat.
Well, this bothered me so much, I decided not to send our non-PA daughter there. And, of course, I immediately ran home and called the school branch where PA DD is going, and thank goodness they run things differently and expect everything brought into the school to be safe. They check any lunches brought from home, if it's not safe they give the child something else to eat and send a reminder home.
I mostly made the decision on an emotional basis, but DH totally supported me, because as he said, How do we know she's not allergic? So I think we will be getting her tested at some point in the future. I asked our allergist about it at oldest DD's last visit, and she said she had always said there was no reason to test a sibling who had never been exposed, but one mother insisted and low and behold, the sibling was allergic! I'm still not sure how that could happen, but it made me realize that you can never assume.
Sorry for hijacking the thread a bit! Long story short, our whole family abstains from may-contains, and I don't think any of us feel that it's a problem.
[This message has been edited by Kim M (edited July 27, 2004).]

Posted on: Tue, 07/27/2004 - 3:44pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Kim M. (good to see you posting by the way, have missed you [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] ), if and when you have your daughter tested, would this be considered her "first exposure"?
As I explained above, that's what got me totally confused. The allergist (and he is considered a *good* one) seemed to believe that she was non-PA and that she would have shown up PA regardless of never having eaten a peanut product in her life (or "may contain" at that point).
But then I posted about it here and got totally confused.
I just figure by now, with Em having finished her third year of school, there would have been some indication if she was, if that makes any sense at all. She has most definitely eaten "may contains" now since I did begin to allow that at school only.
And yet when I post this, I feel like I'm being lax or care less about Em than I do Jess and that's so not the case. It's just that *gut* thing again. The same thing that told me that day in the car that something was *wrong* with Jesse and that we had to get to hospital right away and yet I knew NOTHING about food allergies then. There is no family history or anything. It was just something that happened and I knew something was *wrong* and I knew it probably had to do with the chocolate bar he had just had a bite of.
Oh, Kim M. off topic, but you really should check out the Without a Trace discussion board, if you haven't already. It is quite fabulous and apparently during regular season they discuss each episode detail by detail. I've been having much fun with it lately. On the same website, there is also CSI (regular, not CSI Miami), Alias, and The X-Files. Me, well, I'm in heaven. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
rebekah, I do understand what you're saying about if you make it an issue it will become an issue and as I posted in this thread (I believe, the hour is late), I do know that I am going to have difficulties with my daughter because she is very strong willed when it comes to the rules of our household about peanut/tree nut free, including "may contains". It has started already (she will be 7 in a couple of months) and I can only see it becoming more problematic. I'm just hoping to work it out through educating her continually on the seriousness of her brother's allergy.
Also, since we're solely dealing with PA right now (touch wood), her not eating what Jesse can't eat, doesn't limit our food choices all that much. It's not as though we're dealing with other FA's as well, which I can see as being more problematic for a family, as a whole to eliminate (but I also see that as being do-able if one wants to or feels the need to).
It's working for our family right now, and has for nearly 7 years, so I'm going to leave it the way it is.
Now, I do on occasion eat a "may contain" product, but it would be a rare occasion. It was only what within the last month that I ate a "may contain" product in front of Jesse and I must say I will never do that again.
As far as tree nuts, and Jesse is not TNA, I won't eat them either, and I won't eat them when I'm away from him. I did that two years ago when I was working at the antique warehouse and you would have thought that I had eaten a peanut instead of a walnut the way I went about scrubbing everything before I went home that day. I didn't care for the feeling.
I just really want ONE place that Jesse will always feel safe. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Tue, 07/27/2004 - 3:47pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Oh, but I do have to say this (does the woman ever shut up? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] ). I have dear dear friends that are members here who I know that their PA child's siblings eat peanut products in their home or that their homes are not peanut/nut free. And I'm totally okay with that, for their family. I respect that and I do understand where they're coming from.
Maybe it's because I never liked pb in the first place, I don't know.
But although I have such a strict (if you will) stance on the matter, I totally respect anyone who does things differently.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 07/28/2004 - 4:49am
Kim M's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/09/2001 - 09:00

Cindy, I know what you mean about the confusion about testing. If she had a skin test and was negative, I would worry that that was her first exposure and would probably want her to be tested again. Very confusing. Probably better, and easier, to just keep everyone eating safe food.
Off topic: I haven't been posting much because the summer has been busy, but I do still check the board every day. What Without a Trace discussion board are you on? I at first thought you were talking about a CBS board, but then the other shows are non-CBS, so that can't be it. If you are talking about Television Without Pity, I'll fall down, because I love that site, and I spend [i]way[/i] too much time there. But if there's another good TV board, I'm happy to check it out.

Posted on: Wed, 07/28/2004 - 11:19am
Scooby's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/09/2000 - 09:00

Lalow, my family is in a similar situation, although it is my older DS that has the allergies (milk, egg, pn, tn). Younger sister does not have any, as far as we know.
She eats many things he cannot have, as do DH and I. We attempt to limit it to foods that he would not really like anyway. He is quite picky.
DS is very understanding of his difference and takes it in stride. He rarely complains.
He learned at a young age, because he was around other children at daycare, that he just couldn't eat the same as others. Actually I believe that was in some ways a blessing as I do not worry much about him now in school, that he would eat something unsafe just because he was tempted. He is entering second grade.
And Cindy, yes, it is doable to have a family with MFA limit their menu; however, it is quite difficult and not necessarily nutritionally healthy. I gave up DS's allergens for 2 years while breastfeeding, ableit not to the extent of worrying about x contamination. It took a lot of determination and really altered my family's lifestyle.

Posted on: Wed, 07/28/2004 - 11:29am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Kim M., yes, as far as testing, it is really unclear as to whether Ember is PA or not. I'd have to find the thread here where I posted about it, but I do know the allergist did something else with her, rubbing a pb like substance on her skin to double-check and he really seemed to feel that she wasn't PA. After posting about it here, and getting the response that it would have been her first exposure, I did call him, and he still stood by the skin prick testing and that she was negative.
It still is a *gut* thing with me though. I just know and can't explain it, that Ember is not PA.
Once we get all of our ducks in a row, if ever, when we get settled in our new city (or old city, whatever), I'll see if it's something I want to consider having done again with Em. Not Jess though.
The website is Your Tax Dollars At Work and features CSI, Alias, The X-Files and Without a Trace:-
[url="http://66.235.194.160/forums/"]http://66.235.194.160/forums/[/url]
There is a heavy bias towards Jack having short hair and also much promotion of a romantic relationship between Jack and Samantha, but, as with any discussion board, you can simply ignore what you disagree with.
And they do have some yummy pics of Mr. LaPaglia.
Right now they're gearing up there (sorry lalow [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img] ) for Season #3 and apparently a custody fight between Jack and Marie.
I had started out just with a Yahoo group that was an Anthony LaPaglia fan club, then found this one, which is more a discussion board like PA.com. To-day, I found another Yahoo group for Without a Trace exclusively as well and the *nice* things about the Yahoo groups is that you can just get a daily digest e-mail of what's being posted, you don't have to keep going and checking out the group.
All this time with the 'net and look how long it's taken me to find certain things. Of course, on the up-side, all of my 'net time has been spent at PA.com! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Pages

Forum

Click on one of the categories below to see all forum topics.

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

Are you tired of serving fresh-cut fruits and veggies as a healthy snack? Sure, there's nothing wrong with these options, but they can get boring...

Are you craving cake? Perhaps there's an upcoming birthday...

In the United States, there are no lines of ice cream that are dedicated to being nut-free....

Molecular allergy component testing identifies the specific food or environmental proteins triggering a person’s allergic reactions. Component...

Fact 1: Over a third of food allergy reactions happen after the first known oral...